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Publication numberUS2921789 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 19, 1960
Filing dateMay 22, 1958
Priority dateMay 22, 1958
Publication numberUS 2921789 A, US 2921789A, US-A-2921789, US2921789 A, US2921789A
InventorsSkinner Sr James L
Original AssigneeSkinner Sr James L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rocking horse
US 2921789 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 19, 1960 J. L. SKINNER, SR 2,921,789

ROCKING HORSE Filed May 22, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

JAMES L. SKINNER, 5R

Jan. 19, 1960 J. 1.. SKINNER, SR 2,921,789

ROCKING HORSE Filed May 22, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 F166" ,a H67 27 29 W H m INVENTOR.

JAMES L. SK/NNER,$R

BY ram/M40 1 United States Patent O ROCKING HORSE James L. Skinner, Sr., Memphis, Tenn.

Application May 22, 1958, Serial No. 737,091

11 Claims. (Cl. 27253.2)

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in rocking horses.

One of the disadvantages of rocking horses of the well-known type in which the body of the horse is supported from a rocker extending therebelow is that when the horse is rocked it has a tendency not to stay in one place but to move or creep along the fioor from the spot where it was first placed, thereby bumping into furniture and getting in the way of people.

Therefore, one of the objects of the present invention is to provide a rocking horse which will overcome the above-mentioned disadvantage and will remain in one spot where placed on the floor, yet will be freely and easily rockable back and forth.

A further object is to provide such a rocking horse in which the rocking parts are disposed in the interior of the horse out of sight, whereby more nearly simulating the appearance of a running horse and eliminating any exterior rockers which get in the Way and which would otherwise bump into furniture and the like causing damage thereto.

A further object is to provide in such a rocking horse means for moving the front legs out of phase with one another and, similarly, moving the back legs out of phase with one another, whereby more nearly simulating a running horse. 7

A further object is to provide in such a rocking horse a stand constructed for permitting up and down movement of the horse in addition to the rocking movement, whereby the bouncing movement of a horse may be simulated. I A further object is to provide unique means for simulating the sound of a running horse, which means may be engaged or disengaged at will.

A further object is to provide a stand construction which may be folded conveniently for storage.

A further object is to provide a unique rocking horse which is simple in construction, yet simulates to a high degree the movements of a running horse.

A further object is to provide a rocking horse comprising a stand adapted to rest upon a supporting surface in a fixed position, said stand including a platform, a horse body including a rocker portion in the interior thereof, said horse body being provided with a downwardly opening cavity in the belly portion thereof with said rocker portion forming the upper boundary of said cavity, said horse body being rockably mounted on said stand with said rocker portion in rocking engagement with said platform.

A further object is generally to improve the design and construction of rocking horses.

The means by which the foregoing and other objects of the present invention are accomplished and the manner of their accomplishment will be readily understood from the following specification upon reference to the accompanying drawings, in which: 7

Fig.;1 is a side elevational view of the preferred embodiment of the present invention.

Patented Jan. 19, 196G Fig. 2 is a fragmentary sectional view taken as on the line IIII of Fig. l.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary side elevational view of a modified form of the present invention with parts broken away for purposes of illustration.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view taken as on the line IV-IV of Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 3 of the other side of the horse.

Fig. 6 is a plan view of the stand of the present invention.

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary view of the lower portion of a modified form of the stand of the present invention with parts broken away for purposes of illustration.

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary view on an enlarged scale of a portion of.one of the foot members of the stand showing the joint of the inner and outer members of the foot member with the members being in a disposition for use.

Fig. 9 is a view similar to Fig. 8 showing the outer member folded under the inner member for storage.

Referring now to the drawings in which the various parts are indicated by numerals, Fig. 1 illustrates the preferred embodiment of the present invention which comprises a horse, designated in general as at 11, which horse includes a body 13, rockably mounted upon a stand 15. The animal form supported upon stand 15 need not necessarily be a horse but may take the'form of some other animal without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention.

Referring now more specifically to stand 15, in the preferred embodiment shown in Fig. 1 the stand preferably comprises a vertically disposed rigid supporting member 17 which is preferably cylindrical in cross-section adjacent the lower part thereof as at 19 and preferably rectangular in cross-section adjacent the upper part thereof as at 21. Integrally formed adjacent the upper end of supporting member 17 is a platform 23 which projects forwardly and rearwardly from supporting member 17 and includes a substantially horizontal upper face 25 and opposite side faces 27 depending from opposite side edges of upper face 25. In addition to supporting member 17 and platform 23, stand 15 includes a plurality of elongated foot members 29 fixedly attached to supporting member 17 adjacent the lower end thereof and extending outwardly therefrom at QO-degree intervals, as best shown in Figs. 1, 6, 8, and 9. Each of foot members 29 is preferably foldably constructed for convenience of storing the stand. Thus, each of foot members 29 preferably comprises an inner member 31 which is the inner portion of foot member 29 attached to supporting member 17, and comprises an outer member 33 swingably attached to inner member 31 as by a hinge 35 which is pivotally connected to inner member 31 as at pivot point 37 by a pin or the like and pivotally connected to outer member 33 as at 39 by a pin or the like. The outer end of inner member 31 is preferably of stepped construction, as best shown in Figs. 8 and 9. By stepped construction is meant a step 41 establishes the terminus of a part of the main body of inner member 31 and the other part of the main body of the inner member projects outwardly beyond step 41 as at 43. The inner end of outer member 33 is also of stepped construction and conversely formed relative to the step construction of inner member 31 so that inner member 31 and outer member 33 are.

adapted to fit together in mating relationship as best shown in Fig. 8. Thus, outer member 33 is provided with a step 45 and a projection 47. Hinge 35 preferably interconnects the main body of inner member 31 and projection 47, as best shown in Fig. 8 so that whenlfoot member 29 is in the in use or extended position shown in this figure, outer member 33 is in alignment with inner member 31 and will not swing upwardly relative to the inner member; but, when it is desired to store the stand, the stand may be lifted upwardly and outer member 33 folded under inner member 31in fiat face-to face engagement therewith, asshown in Fig. 9.

A centrally disposed cavity 49'having spaced side walls 50 is provided. in the. under or belly portion 51 of body 13. Cavity49, when viewed from the side as shown in dotted lines in Fig. l, is substantially T-shaped and includes an elongated upper portion 53 and an entrance portion 55 depending from the upper portion and opening downwardly. The portion of body 13 which defines the 7 upper boundary of cavity 49 is'convex in construction to Provide a rocker 57. Body 13 is rockably' supported by stand 15 with the upper portion of stand 15 received in cavity 49 and with rocker 57 in rocking engagement with upper face '25.

. The width of cavity 49 between sidewalls 50 is preferably only slightly greater than the width of platform 23, as best seen in Fig. 2, whereby preventing disengagement of the rocker from the platform during the use of the rocking horse. Also, the length of cavity 49 is only slightly greater than the length of platform 23, as best seen in Fig.. 1, whereby additionally preventing disengagement of the rocker. from the platform. Entrance portion 55 is flared downwardly and outwardly, as best seen in Fig. 1, so as to allow rocking movement of body 13 relative to stand 15.

In the operation of the rocking horse, it will be understoodt'nat a child mounted on the horse in seat or saddle 59 and holding onto the rigid hand grip 61. may rock body 13 backward and forward. It will be understood that this rocking motion may be accomplished since rocker 57 will rock backward and forward on the upper face 25 of stationary platform 23. Hand grip 61 is preferably rigidly mounted from body '13 with reins 62 loosely extending to the horses mouth from the points of attachment of hand grip 61 with body 13.

In the preferred form heretofore described, the legs of the horse are rigidly attached to the body and move with the body. However, a modified form of the present invention is shown in Figs. 3, 4, and in which the legs of the horse are movable to simulate the movement of a running horse. This modified form is described in detail as follows: A pair of front legs 63, 65 are pivotally connected with body 13 as at pivot points 67, 69 respectively and a pair of back legs 71, 73 are pivotally mounted from body 13 as at pivot points 75, 77 respectively. The upper portion of legs 63, 65, 71, and '73 are preferably formed in a substantially circular construction as best seenin Figs; 3 and 5, as at 79, 81, 83, and 85 respectively, with the pivot points 67, 69, 75, and 77 being respectively disposed centrally of the circular portions. The main body portions of legs 63, 65, 71, and 73 extend outwardly from their respective circular portions through openings 86, 87, 88, and 89 in body 13. Rigid links 90, 91, 92, and 93 respectively interconnect legs 63, 65, 71, and 73 with stand 15. Thus, link 90 is pivotally connected adjacent one end to stand 15 as at pivot point 95 and pivotally connected adjacent the other end to circular portion 79'as at pivot point 97. Link 91 is pivotally connected adjacent one end to stand 15 as at pivot point 99 and pivotally connected adjacent the other end as at pivot point Hi1. Pivot point 97 is disposed above pivot point 67 and pivot point 101 is disposed below pivot point 69, whereby when body 13 is rocked as heretofore described links 90, 91 will respectively urge legs 63, 65 forwardly and rearwardly'in swinging movement out of phase with one another, i.e., one

leg will move forwardly while the other is moving rearwardly' and vice versa. In a similar manner, link 92 is pivotally connected to stand 15, as at pivot point 103, adjacent. one end of the link and pivotally connectedadjacent the other end of the. link to leg 71, as at pivot point 105. Similariy, link 93 is pivotally connected to stand 15, as at pivot point 107, adjacent one end of the link and pivotally connected to leg 73 adjacent the other end of the link, as at pivot point 109. Pivot point 105 is disposed below pivot point 75 and pivot point 109 is disposed above pivot point 77, whereby when the body 13 is rocked as heretofore described links 92, 93 will respectively urge legs 71, 73 forwardly and rearwardly in swinging movement out of phase with one another. It will be understood that the disposition of the device in Figs. 3 and 5 is a middle or intermediate position and the legs will swing backward and forward through this mid-position. Thus,.when. the horse body 13is rocked downwardly or counter-clockwise from that position shown in Fig. 3, the legs will be swung to the following positions: Front leg 63 will be swung rearward; front leg 65 will be swung forwardyback leg 71 will be swung forward; and back leg 73 will be swung rearward. When the horse is rocked in the opposite directionthat is, towards a position in which the head of the horse is tilted upwardlythe respective legs will be swung in the opposite directions from those above described.

Noise-making means simulating the sound of a running horse is provided, which noise-making means comprises a resilient member 111, as a piece of spring steel or the like, attached adjacent one end to the circular portion of one of the horses legs, whereby being adapted to move in an are about the pivotal connection of the leg and the body. Thus, in the drawings is shown such a resilient member 111 fixedly attached adjacent one end thereof to circular portion 83 and extending rearwardly thereof. A recess 113 is provided in body 13 adjacent circular portion 8 3 to permit the noise-making means to function and in which recess a carrier 11-5 is movably mounted from the body. Carrier 115 is preferably, though not. necessarily, formed of wood or the like and a plurality of detents 1'17, as nails, spikes, or the like, are driven into carrier 115 in spaced relationship. An elongated handle 1'19 is attached at one end to carrier 115 and extends outwardly, through a hole in body '13 to the exterior of the body, whereby means is provided for manually moving carrier 115. The carrier is movable into a first position shown in solid lines in Fig. 3 in which detents'117'are disposed for successive engagement by resilient member 111 as the body is rocked. This successive engagement of the resilient member with the detents simulates the sound of a running horse. Additionally, carrier 1*15is movable into a second position shown in dotted lines in Fig. 3, in which detents 117 are disengaged from resilient member 111, thus providing means for eliminating, if desired, the sound of the running horse.

A modified construction of the lower part of stand 15 is shown in Fig. 7. This modified construction of stand 15 is applicable to the preferred embodiment of the rocking horse shown in Fig. 1, as well as the modified'form shown in Figs. 3, 4, and 5; In this modified construction of stand 15, supporting member 17 is constructed so that the upper portion 121 of the stand is resiliently supported for vertical movement relative to the stationary 'lower portion 122 of the stand. Hence, instead of supporting member 17 being of rigid construction as heretofore described, upper portion 1'21 is telescopically received in a receptacle 123. Thus, receptacle 123 is provided with an upwardly opening socket 125 in which is received the lower end of upper portion 121. A resilient means, as a compression spring 127 or the like, is disposed between the lower end of portion 121 and the! bottom of receptacle 123, whereby body 13 is supported for bouncing movement. A pin i129 fixedly mounted on portion 121 projects outwardly therefrom and is received in a vertical slot 131 in receptacle 123, whereby preventing rotation of body 13 relative tothe stationary lower portion 122 of the stand. Slot 131 is open at the. upper upper end of receptacle 123 whereby upper portion 121 is removable from lower portion 122 for storage. As in the preferred embodiment of stand 15, foot members a u 29 extend outwardly from the lower end of the supporting member.

From the foregoing description, it will be understood that a rocking horse of unique construction is provided that will remain in a fixed position upon the floor and not creep. Moreover, a minimum of structure is provided on the exterior of the horse body, whereby not distracting from the childs imagining that he is riding upon a real horse. Inaddition, a rocking horse is provided which, to the delight of the child, will perform a variety of movements and make a noise closely simulating a running horse.

Although the invention has been described and illustrated with respect to a preferred embodiment thereof, it is to be understood that it is not to be so limited since changes and modifications may be made therein which are within the full intended scope of this invention as hereinafter claimed.

1 claim:

1. A rocking horse comprising a stand adapted to rest upon a supporting surface in a fixed position; said stand including a platform adjacent the upper end thereof having a substantially horizontal upper face and sides depending therefrom, a horse including a rocker in the interior thereof and including walls disposed adjacent the rocker, said horse being provided with a downwardly opening cavity in the belly portion thereof with said rocker forming the upper boundary of said cavity and said walls forming the side boundaries thereof, said horse being rockably mounted on said stand with said rocker in rocking engagement with said upper-face of said platform, said walls being closely spaced from the sides of said platform, whereby preventing disengagement of said rocker from said platform.

2. A rocking horse comprising a stand adapted to rest upon a supporting surface in a fixed position, said stand including a platform adjacent the upper end thereof, a

, horse provided with a downwardly opening cavity, said horse including a rocker adjacent said cavity in the interior of said horse, said horse resting on said stand with said rocker in rocking engagement with said platform.

3. The structure according to claim 2 in which said stand includes a vertical supporting member attached to said platform and depending therefrom, a plurality of foot members attached to said supporting member adjacent the lower end thereof and extending outwardly therefrom, said supporting member being of telescopic construction and including an upper portion and an upstanding receptacle provided with an upwardly opening socket, said upper portion being slidably received in said socket for upward and downward movement of said supporting member and said horse, resilient means interposed between the lower end of said supporting member and said receptacle whereby said horse is supported for bouncing movement.

4. A rocking horse comprising a stand adapted to rest upon a supporting surface in a fixed position; said stand including a platform adjacent the upper end thereof having a substantially horizontal upper face and sides depending therefrom; a horse including a rocker in the interior thereof and including walls disposed adjacent the rocker, said horse being provided with a downwardly opening cavity in the belly portion thereof with said rocker forming the upper boundary of said cavity and said walls forming the side boundaries thereof, said horse being rockably mounted on said stand with said rocker in rocking engagement with said upper face of said platform, said walls being respectively closely spaced from the sides of said platform whereby preventing disengagement of said rocker from said platform, said horse in cluding a body, a pair of front legs pivotally mounted from said body, and a pair of rear legs pivotally mounted from said body, links respectively interconnecting said legs and said stand, each of said links being pivotally conat the other end to its related leg, the pivotal connection of one of said front legs with its related link being below the pivotal connection of the leg with said body and the pivotal connection of the other ofsaid front legs with its related link being above the pivotal connection of the leg with said body whereby said front legs are adapted to swing back and forth out of phase with one another when said horse is rocked, the pivotal connection of one of said rear legs with its related link being below the pivotal connection of the leg with said body and the pivotal connection of the other of said rear legs with its related link being above the pivotal connection of the leg with said body whereby said rear legs are adapted to swing back and forth out of phase with one another when said body is rocked.

5. A rocking horse comprising a stand adapted to rest upon a supporting surface in a fixed position, said stand including a platform adjacent the upper end thereof, a horse provided with a downwardly opening cavity, said horse including a rocker adjacent said cavity in the interior of said horse, said horse resting on said stand with said rocker in rocking engagement with said platform, said horse including a body, a pair of front legs pivotally mounted from said body, and a pair of rear legs pivotally mounted from said body, means respectively interconnecting said legs and said stand for urging said front legs in swinging movement out of phase with one another and for urging said rear legs in swinging movement out of phase with one another.

6. The structure according to claim 5 in which said stand includes a vertical supportingmember attached to said platform and depending therefrom, a plurality of foot members attached to said supporting member adjacent the lower end thereof and extending outwardly therefrom, said supporting member being of telescopic construction and including an upper portion and an upstanding receptacle provided with an upwardly opening socket, said upper portion being slidably received in said socket for upward and downward movement of said supporting member and said horse, resilient means interposed between the lower end of said supporting member and said receptacle whereby said horse is supported for bouncing movement.

7. The structure according to claim 2 including a carrier mounted from one part of said horse, a resilient member mounted from another part of said horse movable relative to said one part, a plurality of spaced detents mounted from said carrier, said carrier being selectively movable between a first position and a second position, when in said first position said carrier being disposed for successive engagement of said detents by said resilient member to provide a noise simulating the sound of a running horse and when in said second position said carrier being disposed for disengagement of said detents from said resilient member to eliminate the sound of the running horse.

8. A rockinghorse comprising a stand adapted to rest upon a supporting surface in a fixed position; said stand including a platform adjacent the upper end thereof having a substantially horizontal upper face and sides depending therefrom, a horse including a rocker in the interior thereof and including walls disposed adjacent the rocker, said horse being provided with a cavity including a downwardly opening entrance portion in the belly portion of said horse with said rocker forming the upper boundary of said cavity and said walls forming the side boundaries thereof, said horse being rockably mounted on said stand with said rocker in rocking engagement with said upper face of said platform, said walls being closely spaced from the sides of said platform and said entrance portion being smaller than said platform whereby preventing disengagement of said rocker from said platform.

9. A rocking horse comprising a stand adapted to rest upon a supporting surface in a fixed position, said stand,

including a platform adjacent the upper end thereof, a V 11. The structure according to claim 5 in which said horse provided with a downwardly opening cavity, said cavity i'ncluda a downwardly opening entrance portion horse including a rocker adjacent. said cavity in the insmaller than said platform. terior of said horse, said horse resting on said stand with said rocker in rocking engagement with said platform, and 5 References Cited In the 5 Of T1115 Patent said horse adjacent the part thereof which defines said UNITED STATES PATENTS cavity snbstantially encompasslng sald platform to pre- 460,568 Doubler Oct. 6, 189,1 ventracc dental removal therefrom. 860 517 Berghmd July 16 1907 10-. The structure according to claim 4 in which said 2,469,263 7 Fischer May 3, 1949 cavity includes a downwardly opening entrance; portion 10 smaller than said platform.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US460568 *Feb 28, 1889Oct 6, 1891The Diamond furniture CompanyJohn w
US860517 *May 18, 1907Jul 16, 1907George C BerglundGymnasium apparatus.
US2469263 *Nov 30, 1945May 3, 1949Fischer Henry JGalloping hobbyhorse
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3055672 *Apr 6, 1960Sep 25, 1962Marvin I GlassToy hobbyhorse with sound simulating means
US4289307 *Feb 9, 1979Sep 15, 1981Cbs Inc.Riding toy with sound effects
US5328410 *Feb 5, 1993Jul 12, 1994Today's Kids, Inc.Toy riding apparatus
US8529310Feb 1, 2011Sep 10, 2013Radio Flyer Inc.Children's riding toy having electronic sound effects
DE1267580B *Sep 5, 1962May 2, 1968Mattel IncSchaukeltier fuer zwei verschiedene Gangarten
Classifications
U.S. Classification472/99, 446/325
International ClassificationA63G13/06, A63G13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63G13/06
European ClassificationA63G13/06