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Publication numberUS2921791 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 19, 1960
Filing dateMay 17, 1957
Priority dateMay 17, 1957
Publication numberUS 2921791 A, US 2921791A, US-A-2921791, US2921791 A, US2921791A
InventorsWilliam E Berne
Original AssigneeWilliam E Berne
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Exercising apparatus
US 2921791 A
Images(8)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan; 19, 1960 w. E. BERNE 2,921,791

EXERCISING APPARATUS Filed ifiay 17, 1957 8 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR L;l 22 WILLIAM E. BEfi/VE BY FM #(Jl ATTORNEY Jan. 19, 1960 w. E. BERNE EXERCISING APPARATUS 8 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 17, 1957 INVENTOR WILL IAM E. BER/V5 #IIIIIIJIIIIIIJIIII/ a 9 MILO ATTORNEYS Jan. 19, 1960 w. E. BERNE EXERCISING APPARATUS 8 Sheets-Sheet 25 Filed May 17, 1957 INVENTOR'.

WILLIAM E. BERIVE ATTORNEYS Jan. 19, 1960 Filed May 17, 1957 W. E. BERNE EXERCISING APPARATUS 8 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR 1 WILLIAM E. BERNE ATTORNEYS Jan. 19, 1960 w. E. BERNE EXERCISING APPARATUS 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed May 17, 1957 INVENTORZ WILLIAM E. BER/V5 ATTORNEYS Jan. 19, 1-960 w. E. BERNE 2,921,791

EXERCISING APPARATUS Filed May 17, 1957 8 Sheets-Sheet 6 INVENTOR WILL/AM E. BER/V5 ATTORNEYS Jan. 19, 1960 w. E. BERNE EXERCISING APPARATUS 8 Sheets-Sheet 7 Filed May 17, 1957 m 05 m me E. M M w 254! zaj ir ATTORNEYS Jan. 19, 1960 w. E. BERNE 2,921,791

EXERCISING APPARATUS Filed May 17, 1957 s Sheets-Sheet s IN VEN TOR. WILL [AM E. BERNE BMW 0% ATTORNEY:

United States Patent EXERCISING APPARATUS William E. Berne, Columbia, S.C. i 7

Application May 17, 1957, Serial No. 659,859

Claims. (Cl. 272-79) This invention relates to exercising apparatus, and more particularly to apparatus of the kind including parts operable, for example by human limbs against resistance or opposition which may be predetermined or selected according to the exercise required or prescribed.

Various forms of exercising apparatus of this general character have been known for some time. Familiar examples are gymnasium pull weights, so called rowing machines, and extensible spring devices. One of the limitations of many previously known exercising apparatuses is that, individually, they are limited in use to the exercising of relatively few parts of the human body. Hence, many gymnasiums and other exercising establishments are necessarily equipped with a multiplicity of different apparatuses, each adapted for use in exercising only certain muscles or the same muscles in a few different ways. For obvious reasons, such a multiple unit equipment arrangement is not well suited for small establishments and is particularly poorly suited for home use.

An object of the present invention is to provide an improved exercising apparatus so constituted that it may be set up with different correlative arrangements of the parts so as to be adapted for use in substantially all of the gamut of exercises which may be prescribed. 7

Another object of the invention is to provide an exercising apparatus of the kind referred to which, having regard to its flexibility and versatility, is of compact and simple construction.

Another object of the invention is toprovide an exercising apparatus of the character stated including an improved resistance mechanism. I

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved exercising apparatus resistance mechanism in which movement of a resistance element is opposed by friction, the frictional opposition to movement preferably being selectable or variable.

A further object of the inventiontis to provide an ex-' ercising apparatus including a resistance mechanism mounted for adjustment to different positions, particularly different angular positions, on a support or frame so as to condition the apparatus for use in exercising different muscles or the same muscles indifferent ways.

Other objects of the invention will become apparent from a reading of the following description, the appended claims, and the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view showing apparatus embodying the invention set up in one typical condition for use;

Figure 2 is a top plan view of resistance mechanism shown in Figure 1, with two operating arms shown in horizontal section; a

Figure 3 is a fragmentary elevation of the resistance mechanism as, viewed from the left of Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a fragmentary elevation of the resistance mechanism as viewed from the right of Figure 2 and drawn on a slightly enlarged scale;

Figure 5 is a fragmentary side elevation of the reslstance mechanism as viewed from the left of Figure 4;

Figure 6 is a horizontal section on the line 66 of Figure 4;

Figure 7 is a detailed perspective view of a support for mounting a resistance disk;

Figure 8 is a fragmentary elevation of part of the resistance mechanism with a resistance disk and support therefor shown in positions of adjustment different from those shown in Figures 1 to 6;

Figure 8 is a section on the line 8 8 of Figure 4, showing a resistance disk in elevation;

Figure 9'is a fragmentary view partly in elevation and partly in vertical section showing physically operable means connected to a resistance disk;

Figure 10 is a horizontal section on the line 1010 of Figure l;

Figure 11 is a fragmentary vertical section on the line 11-11 of Figure 1;

Figure 12 is a fragmentary perspective view showing apparatus as illustrated in Figure l, but including additionally two counterbalancing or exercise assisting and resisting'arms;

Figure 13 is a perspective view similar to Figure l, but showing manually operable arms extending downwardly instead of upwardly from the resistance mechanism for varying the exercising;

Figure 14 is a perspective View of the apparatus shown in Figure 1, but showing the apparatus as viewed from a different angle;

Figure 15 is a fragmentary perspective view showing the apparatus equipped and set up for exercising by swinging the users arms upwardly and downwardly while extended; a

Figure 16 is a perspective view illustrating the apparatus set up and conditioned for exercising one leg while the user is in sitting position;

Figure 17 is a fragmentary perspective view showing the apparatus conditioned for exercising both legs while the user is in prone position; a

Figure 18 is a perspective view of a shoe or foot appliance member adapted for connection to the exercising apparatus when used as shown in Figures 16 and 17;

Figure 19 is a bottom plan view of the shoe appliance shown in Figure 18; a

Figure 19 is a fragmentary perspective view of a device for connecting a shoe appliance to resistance mechamsm;

Figure 20 is a perspective View showing the apparatus set up for receiving a limb stump for exercising by an p e;

Figure 21 is a perspective view of a modified construction or arrangement. including a handor shoulder exercising wheel; 7 a a Figure 22 is a section on the line 2222 of Figure 21;

Figure 23 isa horizontal section on the line 23-23 of Figure 22;

Figure 24 is a fragmentary perspective view showing the hand or shoulder wheel equipment with the parts in different relative positions from those shown in Figure 21;

Figure 25 is a perspective view showing the apparatus I with the hand or shoulder wheel and Figure 26 is a section on the line 26 -26 of Figure 4 illustrating a selective one-way-drive transmitting or ratchet device;

Figure 27 is a sectional view similar to Figure 26, but

7 showing the parts set or adjusted for reverse drive transmitting; A

Figure 28 is a section on the line 28-28 of Figure 27; Figure 2 9 is a detailed end elevation of: the ratchet device; Y 1 i Figure 30 is a view similar to Figure 29, but with a ratchet setting device and retaining ring nut omitted; and Figure 31 is a section on'the line 3131 of Figure 28, showing the ratchetdevice in elevation.

Apparatus constructed in accordance with the present invention is capable of being setup or adjusted to manydifferent conditions enabling-it effectively to be used for exercising the various human muscles in many difierent ways; Figures 1'-15 and 21-25 show the apparatus conditioned in difierent ways for being used for exercising by manipulation through the hands. Thedifierent conditioning of the apparatusshown in these views, although having'in common adaptability to operation by the users hands, enables ditferent muscles to be exercised in different ways. 7 .f

In its general nature, the construction shown in Figures 1-15 and,21- includes a base 1 on which issupported a vertically extending standard 2 provided at its upper end with a frame 3. The frame 3 serves as a mounting for two angle plate'supports 4, 4, in mm respectively mounting rotatable 0r rockable resistance disk elements 5, 5. Physically operable means generally designated 6, 6 connected respectively to the resistance disks 5, 5 are arranged to be rocked back and forth together with their associated disks against frictional opposition. The standard 2 is vertically adjustable for positioning the frame 3, supports 4 and resistance elements 5 at the level best suited for the height of the person using the apparatus and the manner in whichthe apparatus is to be used, according to the muscles to be exercised. The standard 2 preferably is pivoted at its lower end to the base 1 in a manner ,to be capable of rocking back and forth when required, according to the desired exercising or, alternatively, to be locked in vertical position according to the requirements. The supports 4 are so connected to the frame 3 as to be adjustable for positioning the resistance disksat different angles according to the exercising movement required.

In the preferred construction shown as being illustrative of the invention, the base 1 is provided with lockable casters 7 to enable it easily to be moved from place to place and then held in a selected location by locking of 5,921,79r t a the rod 17 and the root of the bore in the telescopic tube 14. The two resistance devices 13 serve normally to centralize the standard 2, that is to maintain it yieldably in a substantially vertical position, but are collapsibly yieldable when force is applied somewhat horizontally to the top of the standard 2 so as to permit the standard to flutter or rock back and forth, which is beneficial in the performance of certain exercises.

When, according to the exercise to be performed, it is better for the standard 2 not to rock back and forth, it may be locked in its central or vertical position by a locking screw 21 threaded into one of the bracket plates 8 and being engageable with the standard lower section 9.

In order to prevent binding or undesired rocking of the mechanism comprising the standard lower put 9, the basel and the yieldable resistance devices 13 when the locking screw 21 is disengaged from the standard part 9, the hole 10 in the lower'end of the standard part 9 is made substantially larger than the pivot pin 11. For example, in one construction the diameter of the hole 10 may be about ,4 inch and the diameter of thepin about /2 inch. Such an arrangement will permit the standard 2 to be rocked to the limits established by engagement of the lower standard section-9 with the cross bars 12, which serve as abutment stops.

In order that the standard 2 may be adjustable as to vertical height, it is constructed to include the lower hollow section 9 and an upper section 22 fitting telescopically into the section 9. A set screw 23 threaded into the secton 9 can be tightened or screwed into engagement with the top section 22 for holding the latter in vertically adjusted position; v The frame 3 at the upper end of the standard section 22 is formed with two upstanding plate portions 24 spaced from each other to provide an intervening slot 25 for receiving the supports 4 and mounting them on the frame in selected positions of adjustment The supports 4 are of identical construction so that a description of the construction and mounting of only one will suflice. Each support 4 is of right angular shapehaving leg portions 26 and 27, normal to each other, one leg portion swivelling movement. about the horizontal axis .of the the casters. 'Ihebase is provided with .two spaced upfor limiting rocking of the standard about the horizontal axis of the pin 11. 1

While itis desirable in certain exercising operations for the standard 2 to be permitted to rock, such rocking preferably istolbe performed against some resistance. Accordingly, there are provided on opposite sides of the standard 2 two telescopic devices generally designated 13 connected at their opposite ends respectively to the standard and the base. In the arrangement shown, each device 13 comprises an outer tube 14 pivoted at 15 to a bracket 16 secured to the lower section 9 of the standard, a rod 17 fitting telescopically in the tube 13 and being pivoted at 18 to a bracket 19 secured to the base 1, and a compression spring 20 interposed between the upper end'of pin 28 so as to enable the support 4 to be located in any of a number of positions from one in which its leg portion 27 is in vertical plane to one in which the leg portion 27 is in horizontal plane, or in any intervening disposition of the leg portion 27. The support 4 may be locked'or secured inany of its adjusted positions by a-locking screw 29 threaded into the frame plate portion 24 and having its end or point disposed for engagement with the support leg portion 26. In order that the support 4 may be swivelled about the pivot pin 28 without interference by theframe 3, the support leg portion 26 has one edge rounded as shown at 26 in Figures 3, 4 and 7.

For mounting one of the disks 5 on each support 4, the leg portion 27 of the associated support is provided with a bearing sleeve 30 haying its axis extending transversely to the axis of the associated pivot screw or pin 28. A shaft 31 extending through the sleeve .30 is formed at its. outer end with a squarersection 31 which fits into asquareopening 5: in the associated resistance disk 5 so that the disk 5 and shaft 31 will be constrained to rotate together. 'The extreme outer end of the shaft 31 is formed witha round section 31 which serves as the inner part of .a'one-way-drive transmitting means,

tioning the ratchet device for'transmitting force from the outer cylinder part 101 to the shaft 31 in one direction or the other.

The ratchet cylinder 101 is formed with a projecting arm 103 which may be directly coupled to or uncoupled from the disk 5 by a screw 104 threaded into the arm 103 and adapted to be extended into or displaced from a hole 5 in the disk 5. When the screw 104 is withdrawn from the hole 5, the coupling of the arm 103 to the disk 5 is controlled by the ratchet device 100 according to the position of the setting device 102. If, however, the screw 104 is advanced to extend into the disk hole 5, the arm 103 and disk 5 ,are constrained to rock together.

Any suitable selective one-way-drive or ratchet mechanism may be employed. In the form shown, the disk shaft 31 is formed at its outer end with a ratchet barrel 105 provided with recesses 106 respectively receiving pawls 107 for rocking about pivots 108 carried by the barrel 105. The pawls 107 are formed with toothed end portions 109, 1 selectively engageable with an internal ring of teeth 111 formed in the outer cylindrical part 101 ofthe ratchet; The barrel 105 is bored axially at its outer end for rotatably receiving a ratchet control cylinder 112 having a flat portion 113 formed with a transverse bore 114 receiving a compresion spring 115 the outer ends of which press detent balls 116 radially outwardly into engagement with the inner surfaces of the pawls 107.] The control cylinder 112 is formed with a flange 117 held against the outer face of the barrel 105 by a ring nut 118 which is recessed to accommodate the flange 117 and is externally threaded at 119 so that it may be screwed'intothe outer cylindrical part 101. The ring nut 118 has bearing engagement with a flange 105 formed on the barrel 105 for holding the flange 105- against a shoulder 101 in the cylindrical part 101. Thus, the ring nut 118 maintains the barrel 105, the control cylinder 112 and the outer cylindrical part 101 in assembled relation.

The control cylinder 112 is further provided with an axial projection 120 extending outwardly beyond the ring nut 118 and being threaded at 121 to receive the setting member 102. it screw 122 extending into an internally threaded bore in the projection 120 prevents the setting member 102 from being accidentally unscrewed from the control cylinder projection 120.

The flange 117 on the control cylinder 112 is cut away at one side as indicated at 123 in Figure to form spaced stop surfaces 123 and 123 selectively cooperable with a stop pin 124 on the barrel 105 for limiting turning of the setting member 102 and control cylinder 112 with respect to the barrel 105.

Figure 26 shows the ratchet parts so adjusted or relatively positioned that counterclockwise turning of the arm 103 and. outer cylindrical part 101 will transmit torque through the pawl teeth 110 and pawls 107 to the barrel 105 and thence to the disk shaft 31. Clockwise turning of the arm 103 and cylindrical part 101 can take place idly with the ring teeth 111 slipping over the pawl teeth 110 without effectively transmitting effort to the pawls. In order to adjust the ratchet for transmission of torque through clockwise rocking of the arm 103 and cylindrical part 101, the setting member and control cylinder 112 are turned to position the detent device comprising thespring 115 and balls 116 as shown in Figure 27, thereby reversing the pawl setting by bringing the pawl teeth 109 instead of the pawl teeth 110 into engagement with the ring teeth 111.

Rocking of each disk 5 is opposed frictionally, and

preferably by friction which may be varied to impose a greater or lesser exercising resistance or load. In the illustrative embodiment, a disk member 32 of frictional material such as fiber or the like is interposed between a pressure part constituted by the inner surface or face of each disk 5 and another pressure part provided by the outer surface or face of the associated support leg potfor establishing greater opposition to rocking of thedisk 5, and loosening of the nut 33, of course,will reduce the frictional opposition to rocking of the disk 5. A suitable pointer and calibration scale may be provided for indicating the pressure between the parts 5, 27, and 32 and hence the resistance to turning the disk 5.

The arm 103 extending from each ratchet cylinder 101 is threaded at its outer end for engagement with a threaded portion of the inner end of an extension arm 6 included in the physically, e.g. manually operable means 6 as shown in Figure 9. Fitted over the outer end of the extension arm 6* is a closed end sleeve 6* held in place by a screw 6 and equipped at-its outer end with a stud formed with a ball 6 received in a socket memher 6 the ball and socket members together providinga universal joint Screwed onto the socket member 6 g is an internally threaded ring 3 5" secured to a pull or thrust rod 35 as by welding. Therod 35 is provided at its opposite end with a hand grasp member 35 In operation when, for example, one kind of shoulder exercising is to be accomplished, the parts may be .adjusted to the relative positions shown in Figure 1 and the knurled nuts 33 adjusted to set the resistance elements 5 under such pressure that their rocking will be opposedv by frictional resistance according to the desired severity of the exercise. If it is desired to emphasize the exertion of pulling force, the pins 104 will be withdrawn from the disk holes 5, and the ratchet devices may be set to enable the arms 6, 103 to rock freely clockwiserelatively to the disks 5, but to be rockable counterclockwise. only while operatively connected to the shafts 31 and resistance disks 5 through the ratchets 100, with resultant rocking of the disks 5 against frictional opposition. Al ternatively, if emphasis is to be on the pushing exertion, the ratchet setting devices 102 may be reversed so as to enable the arms 6*, 103 to rock freely counterclockwise while the disks 5 remain stationary, and to'be rockable clockwise only in unison with the disks 5 and hence against frictional opposition. Still further, when it is required that both fore and aft movement of the arms be resisted, the pins 104 may be advanced into the disk holes 5 so that the arms 6 103 will be constrained to rock withthe disks 5 in both directions.

Other exercises may require that movement of the physically operable means 6 in one direction actually be assisted. To this end, provision is made for optionally mounting an assisting device such as a counterweight on one or both of the assemblies 6. As shown in Figures 1, 9 and 12, each arm 6 is provided adjacent to its inner end with a socket member 36 secured to the arm by a set screw 36*. Each socket member is formed with a bore or seat 36 extending generally parallel to the arm 6" so as to be adapted to receive a counterweight arm 37 as shown in Figure 12. The counterweight arms 37 may be secured to the seats 36 by set screws 36 as shown in Figure 9. Each arm may be provided with a counterweight 38 adapted to bepositioned adjustably along the arm and held in adjusted position by a set screw 38 4 The exercise modifying effect attributable tothe counterweight devices may readily be appreciated by comparison of the arrangements shown in- Figures 1 and 12, Figure 1 showing the apparatus as used without the assisting counterweight devices and Figure 12 showing the apparatus equipped with the counterweight devices for actually assisting movement of the resistance disks 5 clockwise, that is during movement of the'users, arms away.

- 7 from the body.- 1 In addition to assisting the clockwise movement of the resistance disks, the counterweights increase'jheresistance to the counterclockwiserocking of the dis caused by pulling of the armstoward the users body It will be apparent that the constructiondescribed to this point is capable of being set up or adjusted with great flexibility according to the. exercise requirements prescribed by the physician. 'By appropriately adjusting the frictional'resistanceto rocking of the disks 5, setting the ratchet control mernber 102 and the Connecting pin 104,

' by providing or dispensing with the assisting counterforce required. Figure 13 shows the apparatus assembled. to include thesame parts as are shown in Figure 1, but

with the physically operable arm means 6 extending downwardly below the resistance disks 5 instead of upwardly as 'shown in Figure '1. The positioning of the .parts shown in Figure 13 requires the user to bend forwardly instead of standing erect while exercising, thus bringing into use muscles which are not used so much whenoperating the apparatus with the parts adjusted as shown inFigure 1. It is clear that when the arms 6 are positioned to extend downwardly as shown in Figure 13,

the various force regulating adjustments described with reference to Figure 1 and the related figures may also be effected.

A further variation for subjecting the muscles to still diiierent eiforts is shown in Figure 15 in which handles are connected directly to the outer ends of the arms 6 instead of through intervening pullrods as shown in Figure 1.. When the apparatus is assembled and adjusted as shown in Figure 15, the user swings the forwardly extending arms upwardly and downwardly rather than moving them from and toward the body.

Figures 16-19 showtheexercising apparatus set up andequipped for leg exercising. For this purpose a shoe or foot receiving member or appliance 39 is connected to the outer end of the physically operable arm 6 The appliance 39 comprises a bottom 39, sides 39 and securing straps 39. Secured to the shoe bottom 39 is an attaching fitting 39 adapted to be threadably connected to the socket member. 6 at the outer end of the arm 6 so as to provide a universal ball and socket connection between the arm 6 and the shoe 39. V

1 Figure 16 shows the apparatus conditioned for exercising of the right leg only with the user in sitting position.; In this set up, the shoe appliance fitting 39d is screwed onto a'block 39 pivoted at 39 on an ofiset rod 39 extending transversely to the arm 6 and being secured to, a sleeve 39 held in adjusted position on the arm 6 bya set screw 39. V

Figure '17 shows the apparatus adjusted for exercising of both legs with the user in prone position. In this case, each shoe appliance fitting 39 is screwed onto a socket member 6 of the kind shown in Figure 9.

For leg exercising,.the resistance to rocking of the resistance elements 5 may be varied as required in. the same manner as explained with reference to the arm exercising adjustments. The ratchet 100 may be set for opposing movement in either direction andperrnitting relatively unopposed movement in the other direction, or

the pin104 maybe adjusted to connect the arms 6 and 103to the disk-5 so that rocking of the latter may be g tained stationary in vertical position according to the particular leg exercises prescribed. Again, the flexibility and versatility of the exercising apparatus embodying the present invention is apparent. v i i The apparatus is also well adapted for the exercising of stump limbs of amputees. For this purpose, a stump boot member 40 shown in Figure 20 may be connected to the physically operable mechanism 6. The boot 40 is shown as being split to provide conformability and is equippedwith securing straps 40 A connecting rod '40" fixed to the boot 40 is provided with a fastening sleeve or ring 40 adapted to be attached to the socket'member 6 to provide a ball and socket connection between the resistance mechanism and the boot 40. p The apparatus constituted as shown in Figure 20 may be adjusted as previously explained with reference to variation of resistance, providing resistance for movement in either of two directions or in both directions and for compounding the exercising motion by permitting the standard 2 to rock or'flutter. In the arrangement shown in Figure 20, the support 4 carryingthe resistance disks 5 to which the stump boot 40 is connected is shown as being positioned at right angles-to the position of the support 4 shown in the figures of the drawings referred to above so that the disk 5 is rockable about a vertical instead of a horizontal axis. The nature of the exertion requirements may be varied considerably by setting the supports 4 for'rotation of the disks 5 selectively about horizontal or vertical axes as well as other intervening positions with the axes of the disks 5 inclined, whether for leg or arm exercising.

When the prescribed exercise requires the exertion of twisting force, particularly by the shoulder muscles, the apparatus may be adjusted and equipped with a physically operable shoulder wheel as shown in Figures 21-25. In this modified arrangement, a base 41 supported by lock casters 42 carries a vertical standard 43 including a lower section 43 secured to the base and an upper section 43 adjustable telescopically within the lower section 43 and being securable in adjusted vertical position by a set screw 43. An arm 43 extending laterally from the top of the upper standard section 43 is formed with two spaced plate parts 43 providing an intervening slot which receives a support 44 of generally semicircular shape enabling the support to be adjusted angularly with respect to the plate parts 43 about a pivot provided by a screw 45. The adjustment may be maintained by a set screw 45*. The support 44 includes also a pressure disk part 44 in a plane at right angles to the plane of the support part fitting between the fixed plate parts 43.

Extending upwardly from the pressure disk part 44*, as shown in Figure 22, is a shaft or pintle 46 which projects through the hub 47 of a'shoulder wheel 47. A friction disk 48 of fiber or similar material is interposed between the pressure disk 44 and a resistance disk provided by a flange 47 integral with the shoulder wheel hub 47. The upper end of the shaft 46 is threaded to receive a knurled nut 49 by means of which the hand wheel 47 and its resistance disk 47 may be drawn downwardly into forcible engagement with the friction disk 48, adjustment of the nut 49 variably determining the frictional opposition to rotation of the hand or shoulder Wheel 47.

The plane of rotation of the shoulder wheel 47 may be changed according to the prescribed exercise by loosening the set screw 45 and swivelling the support about the screw or pintle 45'. Diiferent angular positions of adjustment of the support and the shoulder wheel are shown respectively in Figures 21, 24 and 25.

A further exercise variation may beeflected by use of an extension handle 50 having a stem 50 fitting telescopically into a spoke of the hand wheel 47 V and a hand grasp. part 50 The extension handle may be secured in adjusted position radially with respect to the hand-wheel by'aset screw 51."A still further exercise 9- variation niay be provided by adjustably positioning-"an unbalaneing weight 52 on one of the hand wheel spokes and locking the weight in adjusted position by a set screw 53. p

It will be apparent from consideration of the foregoing description in connection with the drawings that exercising apparatus constructed in accordance with the present invention is readily adaptable for use in performance of many and greatly varied exercises. It may be used, inter alia, for flexor elbow exercises, abduction and. extensor shoulder exercises, abductor and bilateral hip exercises, knee and hip flexor exercises, and abdominal and intercoastal exercises. In using the apparatus, fluttering the legs synchronously involves musculature from the nipple line to the toes, pelvic stabilizing muscles, quadratus lumborum, abdominals and erector spinali, hip musculature, intercostals and diaphragm, and quadriceps femoris. Physically operable means equipped for operation by the arms and legs have been illustrated by way of example, only. It is clear that resistance mechanism according to the invention may be used in connection with other physically operated means, including, for example hip, torso or other body engaging parts. The apparatus disclosed embodies the invention in preferred forms, but it is intended that the disclosure be illustrative rather than definitive, the invention being defined in the claims.

I claim: 1. In an exercising apparatus, a stationary frame including two horizontally spaced vertically extending plate portions with a vertically extending slot therebetween; two

. supports, each comprising two leg portions substantially normal to each other, one of the leg portions of each of said supports extending into said slot; means connecting the leg portions extending into said slot to said plate portions for swivelling of said supports about substantially horizontal axes to different positions angularly with respect to said frame; two resistance elements; means mounting said resistance elements respectively for rotation on the other leg portions of said supports about axes transverse to said horizontal axes; friction means for opposing rotation of said resistance elements relative to said supports; and physically operable means connected to said resistance elements respectively for turning the latter against the frictional opposition to rotation when said supports are in any of their positions of adjustment about said horizontal axes.

2. In an exercising apparatus, a stationary frame including two horizontally spaced vertically extending plate portions with a vertically extending slot therebetween; two supports, each comprising two leg portions substantially normal to each other, one of the leg portions of each of said supports extending into said slot; pivots respectively connecting the leg portions extending into said slot to said plate portions for swivelling of said supports about substantially horizontal axes to different positions angularly with respect to said frame; means on said frame respectively engageable with the support leg portions extending into said slot for locking said supports in selected positions angularly with respect to said frame; two resistance elements; means mounting said resistance elements respectively for rotation on the other leg portions of said supports about axes transverse to said horizontal axes; friction disks respectively interposed between said resistance elements and the support leg portions on which they are mounted; means for forcing said resistance elements and the respectively associated friction disks and support leg portions into frictional contact for opposing rotation of said resistance elements relative to said supports; and physically operable means connected to said resistance elements respectively for turning the latter against the frictional opposition to rotation when said supports are in any of their positions of adjustment about said horizontal axes.

3. In an exercising apparatus, a base; a vertically extending standard; means mounting said standard on said ing two relatively telescoped freely relatively movable parts and an intervening spring, said devices normally maintaining said standard in substantially vertical position but being yieldable to permit said standard to rock in either direction about said axis; a support mounted on the upper part of said standard; a movable resistance element; means mounting said resistance element for movement on said support and substantially and frictionally opposing such movement; and physically operable means connected to said resistance element for moving the latter against the substantial and frictional opposition to movement thereof.

4. In an exercising apparatus, a stationary frame including two horizontally spaced vertically extending plate portions with a vertically extending slot therebetween; a support comprising two leg portions substantially normal to each other, one of said leg portions of said support extending into said slot; means connecting said one of said leg portions to said plate portions for swivelling of said support about a substantially horizontal axis to different positions angularly with respect to said frame; a resistance element; means mounting said resistance ele ment for rotation on the other leg portion of said support about an axis transverse to said horizontal axis; friction means for opposing rotation of said resistance element relative to said support; and physically operable means connected to said resistance element for turning the latter against the frictional opposition to rotation when said support is in any of its positions of adjustment about said horizontal axis.

5. Exercising apparatus according to claim 4 in which i said physically operable means comprises a hand grasp member.

6. Exercising apparatus according to claim 4 in which said physically operable means comprises a member adapted to be secured to the users foot.

7. Exercising apparatus according to claim 4 in which said physically operable means comprises a limb stump receiving member;

8. Exercising apparatus according to claim 4 in which said physically operable means comprises a hand wheel.

9. Exercising apparatus according to claim 4 in which said transverse axis is also horizontal and said physically operable means comprises an arm connected to said resistance element and extending radially from said transverse axis on one side thereof and being rockable with said resistance element, said apparatus comprising a counterweight member connected to said resistance element and extending to the opposite side of said transverse axis whereby to assist in rocking said arm in one direction and to offer additional resistance to rocking of said arm in the opposite direction.

10. In an exercising apparatus, a stationary frame including two horizontally spaced vertically extending plate portions with a vertically extending slot therebetween; a support comprising two leg portions substantially normal to each other, one of said leg portions of said support extending into said slot; a pivot connecting said one of said leg portions to said plate portions for swivelling of said support about a substantially horizontal axis to different positions angularly with respect to said frame; means on said frame engageable with said one of said support leg portions for locking said support in selected positions angularly with respect to said frame; a resistance element; means mounting said resistance element for rotation on the other leg portion of said support about an axis transverse to said horizontal axis; a friction disk interposed between said resistance element and said other of said support leg portions; means for forcing said resistance element and the associated friction disk and support leg portion into frictionalcontact for o'pposing'rotation of'said resistance element relativeto said support; and physically operable means connected tosaid resist-- ance element for turning the latteragainst the frictional opposition to rotation when said support is in any of its positions of adjustment about said horizontal axis.

References Cited in the file of this patent I UNITED STATES PATENTS 413,015 Bigger 1 Oct. 15,1889 m Sadler Dec. 24, 1957 FOREIGN PATENTS Sweden July 7, 1894

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3013799 *Mar 9, 1960Dec 19, 1961Charles S WiseShoulder exerciser
US3020015 *Nov 24, 1959Feb 6, 1962Seplavy Louis RJackstand
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Classifications
U.S. Classification482/118, 482/97, 482/44, 248/188.1
International ClassificationA63B23/035, A63B21/015
Cooperative ClassificationA63B21/1403, A63B2208/02, A63B21/1484, A63B21/08, A63B21/1492, A63B21/0615, A63B21/015, A63B23/0355, A63B21/1469
European ClassificationA63B23/035F, A63B21/14M6, A63B21/14M2, A63B21/08, A63B21/14A, A63B21/06F, A63B21/14K4H, A63B21/015