Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2922058 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 19, 1960
Filing dateJan 2, 1958
Priority dateJan 2, 1958
Publication numberUS 2922058 A, US 2922058A, US-A-2922058, US2922058 A, US2922058A
InventorsBacon Carl E
Original AssigneeGen Electric
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Generator slot wedge assembly
US 2922058 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 19, 1960" c. E. BACON GENERATOR SLOT WEDGE ASSEMBLY Filed Jan. 2, 1958 INVENTOR.

CARL E. BACON H/S ATTORNEY United States Patent 2,922,058 GENERATOR SLOT WEDGE ASSEMBLY Carl E. Bacon, Lynn'field, Mass., assignor to General Electric Company, a corporation of New York Application January 2, 1958, Serial No. 706,777 Claims. (Cl. 310-214) This invention relates to a slot wedge assembly for a dynamoelectric machine, particularly to a slot wedge for retaining a winding element in a winding slot of a dynamoelectric machine core member.

Conventionally, a coil located in the slot portion of a generator rotor or stator is maintained in place by wedges located end-to-end and dovetailed against radial movement. These wedges are very carefully fitted to obtain the tight fit necessary to prevent axial displacement or rattling of the wedges. This requires costly measuring and machining processes, particularly in the case of a generator rotor where the wedges are subject to high centrifugal forces. A tight fitting wedge in a rotor core is particularly desirable since if the wedges are loose they could upset the balance characteristics of the rotor. When the wedges are tightly fitted in the core member by precise machining they are diflicult to install and very oftencannot be used over again. It can thus be appreciated that if the wedges could be tightly fitted in place without the precise fitting methods now used, a substantial cos-t reduction could be realized due to reduced machining costs since very close tolerances are no longer required.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a slot wedge assembly in which the wedge is maintained tightly in placewithout the necessity of handfitting each wedge to exactly match the wedge slot portion.

It is a further object to provide a wedge assembly in which the wedges can be readily installed and removed without damaging them.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent from the followingdescription taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which- Fig. 1 is a partial sectional view showing the wedge mounted in place;

extends radially into wedge receiving slot 4. Coils 5 are retained in slot 3 by wedges 7 provided with tapered or dovetail side faces 7a which engage similarly tapered walls 40 of slot 4. Wedges 7 are located end-to-end the full axial length of wedge receiving slot 4. The crosssection of wedge 7 in the radial plane is. substantially identical to but slightly smaller than wedge slot 4 to permit ready insertion of wedge 7. Thus when desired, the wedge 7 can be readily removed and replaced without damage thereto. When wedge 7 is in place, an axially extending space 9 is formed between the inner surface 7b of wedge 7, insulation 6, and slot walls 4a, 4b for receiving a spring 8. Spring 8, which'will be described in detail hereinafter, biases wedge 7 outwardly so that the sloped wedge surfaces 7a are in tight frictional engagement with corresponding slot walls 4c. Thus any errors in machining or nonparallelism of surface contact between the wedge surfaces 7a and the walls 40 of the wedge receiving slot 4 is compensated for by spring 8. Wedge 7, when finally positioned in slot 4 by spring 8 retains winding 5 in slot 3 against the high centrifugal forces existing during rotor operation. The outer surface of wedge 7 is made flush with the outer surface of rotor 1 to reduce windage losses.

In the particular illustrated embodiment of my invention, wedge 7 is maintained in tight frictio'nal engagement with rotor 1 by spring 8 located in space 9 and extending the full axial length of rotor 1. As can be seen more particularly in Figs. 2-5, spring 8 comprises a fiat central portion 8a located between wedge 7 and coil insulation 6, and edge portions 8b which are corrugated are dimpled throughout their full axial length. The corrugations 8b are located in shallow clearance spaces 9a formed between wedge dovetail portions 70 and the slot bottom surface 4b. The corrugations 8b,

, before insertion of wedge 7,. have a greater depth than Fig. 2 is a view of the resilient means used for maintaining the slot wedge in place;

Fig. 3 is a side view of the spring member disclosed in Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a section taken along the line 4-4 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a section taken along the lines 55 of Fig. 3; and

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of a section through the wedge.

Generally stated, in accordance with the invention the wedges of a dynamoelectric machine core member are maintained tightly fitted in the wedge receiving slot portion of the core member by special resilient means biasing the wedges into positive contact with the engaging surfaces of the wedge receiving slot portion.

Referring now to Fig. 1, there is illustrated a rotor 1 having a slot 2 extending the full axial length of the rotor and consistingof a winding receiving portion 3 and adovetail wedge receiving portion 4. Located in the winding slot portion 3 is a plurality of coils 5 sursounded by slot insulation 6, the upper surface of which recesses 9a, so that when wedge 7 is inserted, the corrugations 8b are deflected (to a degree within their elastic limit) to provide a resilient biasing force outwardly against wedge 7. By corrugating only the side portions (instead of extending the. corrugations transversely across spring 8) a larger force per unit of deflection is obtained, because longitudinal extension of the corrugations 8b is restrained by the fiat central portion 8a, which is placed in tension when the total height of the spring member is reduced by the compression occurring when the wedges 7 are inserted. Spring 8 thus maintains wedge surfaces 7a in tight frictional contact with the slot walls 4c to prevent rattling or displacement of the wedge.

It is important to note that spring 8, in addition to maintaining wedge 7 tightly in place, serves as a chafing strip to prevent damage to insulation 6 when the wedges are installed. This has previously been accomplished by using a separate chafing strip made of fibrous material of a type which had to be made much thicker than the thin metal spring 8. Thus for a given slot depth, a. greater volume is available for the conductors 5. Furthermore, as indicated in Fig. 6, spring 3 is made as a continuous metal strip that extends the full axial length of slot 2'. Spring 8 thus prevents the insulation 6 from being extruded into the clearance spaces between adjacent ends of the slot wedges if they become separated slightly, when the windings 5 are forced outwardly thereagainst by the highv centrifugal forces imposed during operation.

The spring 8 and wedge 7 are normally made of steel, which can be either'magnetic or non-magnetic, depending on thefluX distribution required. However, with the aid of the invention, wedge 7 could be made of a suitable non-metallic material such as a molded polyester-glass laminate. In the cas e of the spring 8, the cross-section strip stock'of a stainless steel such as that known to the trade as Type.301, fully hardened. In a large generator, on the order of 40,000 kw., for example, this spring might be approximately 1%; inches Wide, of which each corrugated edge portion is approximately inch wide, andthere would be approximately one and one third of the corrugations 8b per linear inch. Also, with a clearance space 9a between wedge and dovetail of approximately. .031 inch and a corrugation height of the spring in the uncompressed condition of .063Jinch, the resilient force per linear inch exertedby the spring on the'wedge -7 will be approximately 100 pounds. This force has been found to be sufficient to maintain the wedge in tight frictional engagement, with the sloped surfaces 7a of rotor 1. However, considerable latitude is available in the adjustment of pitch,'amplitude, thickness, and properties of the spring being used.

Thus it can be seen that my invention provides an improved spring device to resiliently maintain, the slot wedge in place. This very simple spring member serves as well, in which case the springfwedge would normally .be made of a non-conductive material to prevent eddy-- curren losses. I desire it to be understood, therefore, that my invention is not limited to the particular arrangement disclosed and I intend in the appended claims to cover all modifications which do not depart from the true spirit and scope of my invention.

having dovetailing tapered side faces which are in alignment with cooperating tapered faces of the dovetail receiving portion of the slot, spring means disposed in the dovetail receiving slot between the winding and wedges for biasing the wedges into positive contact with said tapered side faces, the spring means extending the axial length of the core portion and including an integral strip member betweenthe winding and associated wedge, and corrugated side portions located in the dovetail receiving portions beneath the cooperating tapered faces, which corrugations aredeflected to bias the wedge 'into tight frictional engagement in the dovetail receiving slot to prevent rattling'of the wedges.

' portion, means for holding the winding in the winding receiving slot portion comprising for each slot a plurality of dovetail wedges located end to end in the wedge receivingslot portion, the wedges being slightly smaller than the wedge receiving portion to define a longitudinal clearance space between the wedge and rotor portion defining the wedge receiving slot, spring means disposed in the clearance space to resiliently maintain the wedges in place, the spring means comprising a strip member" having a flatjcentral portion of substantially the same width as the winding receiving slot portion disposed between the conductor and wedges and extending the full axial length of the rotor to prevent extrusion of the conductor insulation between the wedges during rotation of the rotor, and corrugated side portions extending the full length of the strip and disposed in the longitudinally extending side portions of said clearance space at the opposite sides of the wedge receiving slot portion, said v corrugations having. a greater free radial height than What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. In an electro-rnagnetic device, a core member having a plurality of slots, each slot comprising a winding receiving portion and a dovetail wedge receiving portion wider than the winding receiving slot portion, an insulated conductor disposed in the winding receiving slot portion, wedge means disposed in the wedge receiving slot portion to maintain the. conductor in the winding receiving slot portion, the wedge being slightly smaller than the wedge receiving slot portion to define a longitudinal clearance space between the wedge and the conductor, spring means disposed in said clearance space to resiliently maintain the wedge means in place, said spring means comprising a strip member having a fiat central portion of substantially the same width as the winding receiving slot portion disposed between the conductor and the wedge means, said strip member having corrugated side portions extending the length of the strip and disposed in the longitudinally extending side portions of said clearance-space at the opposite'sides of the wedge receiving slot portion, said corrugations having a greater free radial height than said clearance space whereby they are deflected upon insertion of the wedgeto resiliently bias the wedge into tight frictional engagement in the wedge receiving slot portion.

I 2. An electric machine having a core portion defining a plurality of winding slots, a Winding arranged in each slot, means for holding the winding in the slot comprising a plurality of dovetail wedges fitting in a dovetail receiving portion defined by the slot, the wedges said clearance space, whereby they are deflected upon insertion of the wedge tovresiliently bias the wedge into tight frictional engagement in the Wedge receiving portion of the core slots.

4. In an electromagnetic core member having a wedge receiving slot, wedge means disposed in the slot and being slightly smaller than the slot to define a longitudinal clearance space between the wedge and core member, the improvement comprising a spring means for resiliently maintaining the Wedge means in place which consists of a strip member having a flat central portion and corrugated side portions extending the length I of the strip, the corrugated side portions having a greater free radial height than the clearance space whereby they are deflected upon insertion of the wedge to resiliently bias the wedge into tight frictional engagement in the wedge receiving slot portion.

5. A spring means forresiliently maintaining in place the wedge means of an electr c-magnetic machine comprising a thin longitudinally extending strip member hav- .ing a flat central portion and corrugated side portions extending the length of the strip and less than one-fifth 3 of the width in from each side, the corrugated side por- UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,745,030 Baldwin May 8, 1956 FOREIGN PATENTS I 220,755 Great Britain Aug. 28, 1924 1 758,954 great Britain Oct. 10, 1956

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2745030 *Sep 3, 1952May 8, 1956Gen ElectricDynamoelectric machine core member and method of making same
GB220755A * Title not available
GB758964A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3393335 *Dec 1, 1965Jul 16, 1968Gen ElectricElastomeric spring for restricting radial vibration of windings in slots
US3780325 *Jun 12, 1972Dec 18, 1973Kraftwerk Union AgApparatus for locking stator winding conductors of turbogenerators in position
US3909931 *May 23, 1974Oct 7, 1975Kraftwerk Union AgMethod for securing winding bars in slots of electric generators
US3949255 *May 7, 1973Apr 6, 1976Reyrolle Parsons LimitedDynamo-electric machines
US3976901 *Oct 30, 1974Aug 24, 1976Bbc Brown Boveri & Company LimitedWinding slot closure for rotary electric machines
US4025840 *Apr 9, 1975May 24, 1977General Electric CompanyPermanent magnet generator with output power adjustment by means of magnetic shims
US4093881 *Aug 17, 1976Jun 6, 1978Bbc Brown Boveri & Company LimitedArrangement for supporting winding elements in the stator slots of a dynamo-electric machine
US4117362 *Apr 19, 1977Sep 26, 1978Mark Zakharovich TsirkinRipple-shaped tightening strip for retaining electric machine winding
US4369389 *Apr 28, 1981Jan 18, 1983Dietrich LambrechtDevice for securing winding bars in slots of electric machines, especially turbo-generators
US5239220 *Aug 26, 1992Aug 24, 1993Mitsubishi Denki K.K.Stator wedge and guide jig therefor
US5357670 *Apr 23, 1993Oct 25, 1994Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki KaishaGuide jig for guiding a dove-shaped stator wedge
US5365135 *Nov 12, 1993Nov 15, 1994Westinghouse Electric CorporationGenerator slot hose wedge assembly
US5430340 *Apr 15, 1993Jul 4, 1995General Electric Co.Harmonic current path spring device between retaining ring and rotor wedge of a dynamoelectric generator
US6124659 *Aug 20, 1999Sep 26, 2000Siemens Westinghouse Power CorporationStator wedge having abrasion-resistant edge and methods of forming same
US20080030097 *Mar 16, 2007Feb 7, 2008Bresney Michael JWedge modification and design for maintaining rotor coil slot in a generator
WO2016038277A1 *Sep 2, 2015Mar 17, 2016Valeo Equipements Electriques MoteurStator enabling good shim bearing capacity while optimising the magnetic circuit, and method for electrical insulation of said stator
Classifications
U.S. Classification310/214
International ClassificationH02K3/487, H02K3/48
Cooperative ClassificationH02K3/487
European ClassificationH02K3/487