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Publication numberUS2922628 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 26, 1960
Filing dateMar 11, 1957
Priority dateMar 11, 1957
Publication numberUS 2922628 A, US 2922628A, US-A-2922628, US2922628 A, US2922628A
InventorsEmil Koe
Original AssigneeAnna Koe, Emil Koe Jr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mixing device
US 2922628 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 26, 1960 E. KOE 2,922,628

MIXING DEVICE Filed March 11, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Jan. 26, 1960 E. KOE

MIXING DEVICE Filed March 11, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 13- BY I K09 MIXING DEVICE Emil Koe, Berwyn, 11].; bydistribution under Illinois law two-thirds to Emil Koe, Jr., and one-third to Anna Koe, heirs of said Emil Koe, deceased Application March 11, 1957, Serial No. 645,169 6 Claims. (Cl. 259-128) This invention relates to a mixing device or agitating utensil. More specifically, it relates to a mixing device which employs mechanical action in conjunction with the use of a spiral spring, to impart a violent mixing action to liquids, pastes, granular substances, or other ingredients which require efiicient and efiective mixing.

Thenovel design employs means for driving an axle, which-in combination with a springgenerates simultaeously vertical and rotary action, which actions are reversible orif a clutch is included in the combination may be of a continuous direction, creating the 'afore-mentioned turbulence. a V

Therefore, it is an object of the invention to provide a mixing unit which, because of its unique design, is capable of mixing ingredients efficiently in containers with a minimum of efiort on thepart of the user.

It is still another object of the invention to'provide a portable tool conveniently operated with one handand independent of fixtures, attachments, or holding means. It is still another object of the invention to provide a mixing unit which is so designed that it is adaptable for use in multiple units by assembling plurality of units togetherwith the combination greatly increasing the amount of mixing action which would normally be expected from one mixing unit, even' of the novel type contemplated herein.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a mixing unit which-when not in use-may be assembled with the spring in contracted position-t hereby greatly reducing the normal storage space required and minimizing tangling. e

It is still another object of the-invention to provide a mixing unit provided with means for centering the mixing unit relative to the container in which it is used..

It is still another object of this invention to provide a novehsimple method by which this mixing unit can be dis-assembled for cleaning purposes, and, thereafter, readily re-assembled. I

It is another object of the invention to provide a mixing unit with a propeller blade, to add to the turbulence of the mixing spring near the bottom of the container, to assure total mixing of ingredients in that vicinity.

This and other objects and advantages of the invention contemplated herein will become apparent from the following description and a study of the accompanying drawings wherein:

Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of a novel mixing unit shown positioned with respect to the container in which it may be adapted to be used.

Fig. 2 is a side elevational view of the single mixing unit in a novel position of storage.

Fig. 3 is an exploded view of the various parts making up a single unit embodiment of the invention.

Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken along the line 44 in Fig. l.

Fig; 5 is a side elevational view of a multiple mixing unit incorporating single mixing elements which constitutes the basis for this invention.

ite States Patent "0 ice Fig. 5a is a partial top view of the multiple mixing unit shown in Fig. 5 showing the abutting relationship of the handles.

Fig. 6 is a sectional view taken along the line 66 in Fig. 5 showing in detail the manner in which two mixin elements are coupled together as a unit.

Fig. 7 is a plan view of an agitator disc or propeller blade which is conveniently used with the basic mixing element.

Fig. 8 is a side view when sectioned through the agitator disc showing said disc mounted at the end of the mixing unit axle.

Fig. 9 is a side view showing another form of centering device for centering the mixing unit relative to the container with which it is used.

Fig. 10 is a side elevational view of a diiferent form of spring element being globoidal in shape, and which is one form of spring which has proven useful.

Fig. 11 are sections of various shapes of springs found useful for the purpose of chopping or comminuting materials when such action is desired.

Referring more specifically to the drawings, wherein like parts are designated by the same numerals throughout the various figures, a mixing device or utensil embodying the principles of this invention are shown best in Figs. 1, 3, and 4.

The mixing device 10 includes a rigid, spiral axle :12 which is centrally located within a conical mixing spring 18. At the bottom of the spiral axle 12 is a point of bearing 14, and at the top is a snap lock 16 which serves as a stop in operation of this device, and permits assembly and dis-assembly of spiral axle 12 with the attached spring 18 and the handle 30. The top (smaller diameter portion) 20 of the conical spring 18 is sized to permit smooth, free telescopical movement of the top portion up and down the spiral axle 12, while the bottom (largest diameter portion) 22 is afiixed to the axle 12 in the region of bearing 14. A sleeve 24, preferably of tubular shape, is slotted at 26-such slot being complementary in shape to the cross-section of the axle 12 to permit smooth, free driving movement along the axle 12. This slot 26 is best seen in the exploded view of the assembly shown in Fig. 3. The sleeve 24 may be of two-piece construction including a separate cap 28. Similar means having the same function may be made in other wayssuoh as the use of a pair of rollers (not shown) which would be spaced so as to embrace the axle therebetween. In the event the user desires a clutch element bracket not shown in the disclosure, it may be incorporated into the sleeve 24 so that the spiral spring is driven in one direction, but may be retracted with rotary movement. This might be desirable in certain situations, and is contemplated as an embodiment hereof. The handle 30 is afiixed to sleeve 24 and can be designed as shown, but can also be of square, round, rectangular, or contoured to permit the device to be conveniently grasped. Handle 30 is provided with bore 32 which permits flushing with water, etc., through the driving assembly for cleansing purposes, and also functions in connection with compressing of the mixing spring when device is assembled in storage position described and demonstrated in Fig. 2. In connection with the latter, the bore 32 is counter-bored or otherwise increased in diameter from a point adjacent the extremity of sleeve 24, affixed within the handle 30, to the end of the handle remote from the end on which the sleeve is mounted. This increased diameter portion of the bore is substantially equal to or greater in diameter than the diameter of the top or reduced portion 20 of the conical spring 1 8, for purposes best set forth hereinafter.

In operating the aforementioned mixing device, a downward pressure on handle 30 is transmitted to the driving means or spiral axle 12, causing the latter to rotate on the bearing point 14. In turn, the mixing spring 18 moves with a circular motion while at the same time being compressed in an axial direction. This combination of mechanical .movements causes a'violent mixing action to occur tosolutions or other substance surrounding the spring. Release of the downward pressure on the handle 30 causes the device to be driven by the compressed spring 18, thereby reversing the circular motion of said spring and causing its release to the position shown in Fig. l of the drawings. Thus, by alternate collapsing of the spring 1 8 and releasing same, the spiral axle 12 in combination with the spring generates the aforementioned simultaneous vertical and rotary actionresulting in a high degree of turbulence or mixing action which :has been previously discussed.

The novel method of storage for this device, as shown in Fig. 2, results from the novel design of the elements comprising the mixing device. accomplished by withdrawing the spiral axle 12 from its operable mounted position as shown in Fig. l. The handle is depressed to a position just below that shown in phantom in Fig. 1 at which point the snap-lock 1 6 is exposed above the upper extremity of bore 3'2 and at which point said look 16 can be released or removed to permit withdrawal of axle 12 from its operating telescopic relationship with sleeve 24 and handle 34). Thusly,

the relative sizes of the various elements should be such that when the handle 36 has been depressed and the spring 18 compressed the distance between said snap-lock and the end of the spring designated 20 is substantially equal to the distance between the lower end of sleeve 24 at slot 26 and the upper extremity of handle 20' as seen in Fig. 1. Storage position of the mixing device is accomplished by inserting said axle into the bore 32'at the opposite end of the handle 59. The spring is compressed to a point where the snap lock 16 extends beyond the sleeve 24, and retains the axle and the collapsed spring in the position as shown in Fig. 2. The advantages of such storage include the storage of a smaller element which, of course, is to be preferred. Further, the elimination of a spiral spring with its spaced convolutions which tend to nest with other artlcles stored with it. Further, the elimination of danger of distorting the spring so that its operativeness for the purpose intended is jeopardized.

A combination of a plurality of these mixers into a mixing unit is shown clearly in Figs. and 6. While such a unit can be originally constructed, the unique design of the single units contemplated herein make it extremely simple to make multiple units where suchis desired. To facilitate the assembly of such a multiple unit embodiment, the handles 30a can be constructed so that their lateral exterior surfaces 33a are square or polygonal in shape and substantially parallel toaxle 12a. The abutting flat surfaces of the handles on adjacently positioned single units serve a dual function in that said One novel method of locating the driving axis of this mixer is shown in Fig. l. A locating method employing the use of a nose bearing portion 1 4 on the end of axle 12 which-when housed in a complementary shaped cavity in a container or the likewill serve to stabilize the location of this mixing device while in operation. Another method of accomplishing this same objective is demonstrated in Fig. 9 wherea specially shaped tip 38 on axle 12 is rotatably housed in a rubber orplastic body 40, having a suction surface 4- 2 to adhere to the surface of a container '44. 1 p

A propeller type plate 46 can be assembled, if desired,

' to the bottomof the conicalsspring 18hr in the alternashown in Figs. 7 and 7a. This storage assembly is tive to the end of the axle 12, accentuating the turbulence of this mixing at the bottom of the container in which the ingredients are being mixed. A suggested design of this plate is a series of sheared out blades 50 and 52 as These blades 50 and 52 are preferably angularly deformed relative to the blade in a downward direction, assuring a generating action as the spring rotates in each direction during the complete cycle of operation. Turbulence produced is greatly improved by using such a propeller, and assures adequate mixing at the bottom of the container with which the unit is used. p v 1 A modification of the spring employed in Fig. 1 and previously described is shown in Fig. 10. This spring 20b can be of ribbon type or can be designed with or v/ithout sharpened topand/or bottom edges.

In Fig. 11 is shown 2 cross sections 52 and 54 of springs found usefulandsturdy. Withaspring of this design, the deviceoffers possibilities foruse; as a chopping device for nuts, fruits, etc. This ,spring design can be utilized with either mechanical principle as shown in Figs. 1, 3, 4, and 8.

While applicant has described and shown one form tached, at its free end, to the :free end of axle Til-thus,

assuring the controlledspriug action asthe sleeve 24,

with this opening 26, moved along axle 12. ,The prior abutting surfaces space the axle 12a in substantially parallel relationship a proper distance for the size of spring 20a used, as well as preventing relative rotation between the two adjacent single units. This relationship can be best seen in Figs. 5 and 5a. A clip 34a (best seen in Fig. 6) is adapted to be sprung or mounte in place over the sleeve portions 24a, and to resiliently embrace said sleeve to assure a unit which has all of the characteristics of a single unit. Operation of the device is identical with the previously described operation of a single unit and up and down movement of the handle generates the rotary and vertical action of the plurality of springsZtla to impart to ingredients into which it is put, violent turbulent action. It should be pointed out that a spiral axle of opposite hand can be used so that adjacent springs rotate in opposite directions, thereby assuring maximum in turbulence created y opcrationof the device.

art, with which applicant is acquainted, does notshow the use of an axial element attached to the spring, at the free end, to-control the action ofthe spring, .andto assure the user of the advantages in ,a device such as the element, as disclosed herein. Applicant chose, not to include drawings to explain axle v12 since, by the description, its configuration and operation are apparent.

From the foregoing it will be understood that among others the several objects of the invention as specifically set forth above-are achieved. Obviously, numerous changes in construction and re-arrangement of parts may be resorted to withoutdeparting from the spirit of the invention as defined by the claims.

1. An agitating-device including a-handle, said handle being provided with a longitudinal bore which traverses the entire handle, a sleeve nonrotatably mounted at one end of said handle and axially aligned with said bore, an axle telescopically arrangedvrelative .to-said sleeve and bore and extending in a direction away from said handle, said axle being provided with'a' helical. groove on its outer surface, means on said sleeve cooperable with said helical groove to'rotate said axle as the sleeve and axle are moved axially relative to each. other, and a spring telescopically arranged relative to said axle between saidsleeve and the free end of said axle, the end of thespring remote from said handle being fixed to the free end of said axle, whereby .as said handle is moved in a direction to compress the spring said axle serves to control the spring body and in part a rotary movement to the spring in addition to the axial movement of the spring caused by its being compressed.

2. An agitating device of the type described in claim 1 wherein the free end of said axle is provided with a nose portion extending beyond the lower connection of the spring and shaped to cooperate with a recess in a complementary container with which it is adapted to be used to assure a predetermined positioning of said axle relative to the container during its mixing cycle.

3. In an agitating device of the type described in claim 1 wherein a planar propeller plate is afiixed to the free end of the axle beyond the region of connection of said spring to said axle, said propeller plate being provided with a series of angularly positioned blades relative to the plane of the plate struck out from within the margin of said plate, whereby said propeller plate is rotated with said axle, imparts violent mixing action to ingredients in the vicinity of the plane in which it rotates.

4. An agitating device including a handle, said handle being provided with a bore, a sleeve provided with slot means nonrotatably mounted at one end of said handle and axially aligned with said bore, an axle telescopically arranged with and rotatable relative to said sleeve, said slot means and said bore extending beyond said sleeve in a direction away from said handle, said axle being provided with a spiral configuration on its outer surface, the

slot means on said sleeve cooperable with the spiral surface on said axle to rotate said axle as the sleeve and axle are moved axially relative to each other, and a spring telescopically arranged about said axle and trapped between said sleeve and the free end of said axle, the end of the spring remote from said handle being nonrotatably secured to the free end of said axle whereby as said handle is moved in a direction to compress the spring said axle serves to control the spring body during its rotation and collapse which imparts turbulent action to ingredients in the vicinity thereof, further imparting a rotary movement of the helical elements of said spring in addition to the axial movement of the spring caused by it being compressed.

5. A plurality of normally independent agitating devices coupled together for unitary action, each device including a handle having a polygonal outer configuration, said handle being provided with a longitudinal bore which traverses the entire handle, a sleeve non-rotatably mounted at one end of said handle and axially aligned with said bore, a substantial portion of said sleeve projecting outwardly from said handle, an axle telescopically arranged relative to said sleeve and bore and extending in the same direction away from said handle as the projecting portion of said sleeve, said axle being provided with a helical groove on its outer surface, means on said sleeve cooperable with said helical groove to rotate said axle as the sleeve and axle are moved axially relative to each other, a spring telescopically arranged relative to said axle between said sleeve and the free end of said axle, the end of the spring remote from said handle being fixed to the free end of said axle, whereby as said handle is moved in a direction to compress the spring said axle serves to control the spring body and impart a rotary movement to the spring in addition to the axial movement of the spring caused by its being compressed, said plurality of agitating devices being arranged in parallel adjacent relationship with a portion of each polygonal handle being in contact with a cooperating portion of the next adjacent handle, clip means engaging said plurality of agitating devices on the projecting portion of their sleeves intermediate the handle and spring on each device, said clip means and said polygonal surfaces on said handles cooperatively maintaining said sleeves and said axles of adjacent devices in substantially parallel spaced relationship whereby said plurality of agitating devices can be operated with a unitary action.

6. An agitating device of the type described in claim 1 wherein the bore in the handle is of increasing diameter with the largest diameter being remote from the end of the handle on which the sleeve is mounted, a snap-lock means located in the vicinity of the end of the axle remote from the end to which the spring is secured, the distance between said snap-lock and the end of the spring remote from the secured portion when said spring is in collapsed position being approximately equal to the distance between the remote end of the sleeve and handle assembly at their remote ends, said axle and spring capable of being telescopically assembled with respect to said handle and sleeve so that in mounted position the snap lock on the axle is engaged with respect to the slot in the sleeve and all but the remote ends of the axle and the collapsed spring are encased in the handle and sleeve whereby the axle on spring element may be advantageously stored to eliminate the possibility of the spring portion of the agitating device becoming entangled with other utensils while it is being stored.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 569,428 Saxer Oct. 13, '1896 618,029 Fitch Jan. 17, 1899 1,140,341 Johnston et a1 May 18, 1915 1,208,862 Velissarides Dec. 19, 1916 2,631,826 Wolf Mar. 17, 1953 FOREIGN PATENTS 110,938 Switzerland Sept. 1, 1925 382,386 Great Britain Oct. 27, 1932

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US569428 *Feb 21, 1896Oct 13, 1896 Paint-mixer
US618029 *Jan 31, 1898Jan 17, 1899 Egg-beater
US1140341 *Jan 20, 1913May 18, 1915Arthur W JohnstonEgg-beater or the like.
US1208862 *Aug 21, 1916Dec 19, 1916Velissar VelissaridesEgg-beating implement.
US2631826 *Aug 24, 1950Mar 17, 1953Wallace P WolfSediment stirrer
CH110938A * Title not available
GB382386A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4418436 *Feb 22, 1982Dec 6, 1983Abraham EisenbergBrush bristle cleaning system
US6200015 *Feb 26, 1999Mar 13, 2001The Pampered Chef, Ltd.Mixing container
US8025436 *Oct 8, 2008Sep 27, 2011Harry HenslerWhisk
US8534908 *Sep 7, 2007Sep 17, 2013Handi-Craft CompanyPitcher having mixing device
US20110131818 *Dec 7, 2009Jun 9, 2011Daniel LichtyDevices for extracting semi-solid food material from cylindrical containers
US20110210132 *Nov 3, 2009Sep 1, 2011Florian EnghardBeverage Container
Classifications
U.S. Classification366/129, D07/690, 416/75, 416/176
International ClassificationA47J43/00, A47J43/10
Cooperative ClassificationA47J43/105
European ClassificationA47J43/10B5