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Publication numberUS2924250 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 9, 1960
Filing dateNov 26, 1957
Priority dateNov 26, 1957
Publication numberUS 2924250 A, US 2924250A, US-A-2924250, US2924250 A, US2924250A
InventorsJohn B Sidebotham
Original AssigneeJohn B Sidebotham
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bifurcated textile tubes and method of weaving the same
US 2924250 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1950 J. B. SIDEBOTHAM 2,924,250

BIFURCATED TEXTILE TUBES AND METHOD OF WEAVING THE. SAME Filed NOV. 26, 1957 ,7 I 20 g 2 2 0 2/ INVENT d'on/ 5. (52166052 BY I anew

ATTORNEY BIFURCATED TEXTILE TUBES AND METHOD OF WEAVING THE SANIE John B. Sidebotham, Philadelphia, Pa. Application November 26, 1957,'S erial No. 698,963

9 Claims. (Cl. 139-387) to certain improvements in the tubes, and a method of weaving the same, described and shown in my previous application for Letters Patent of the United States, filed March 23, 1956, Serial No. 573,744, now U.S. Patent No. 2,845,959.

As pointed out in my aforesaid previous application for letters patent, it frequently happens that blood vessels become diseased or injured whereby replacement of the same becomes necessary, and it has been found particularly diificult to replace such blood vessels with artificial tubing .at locations such, for example, as where the aorta branches into the iliac arteries, or under similar conditions in a living body wherever a larger blood vessel branches into two smaller ones.

In such locations, where the branching of the arteries or veins occurs, it is desirable that the total cross-sectional area of the two tubes, beyond the branching, shall bear a certain relationship, to the cross-sectional area of the large or main tube, as otherwise differences in pressure and flow would occur in the tubes.

It has also been found, by actual experimentation, that woven tubes maybe used in which the warp and weft are made of certain of the modern plastics, the various surgical operators, however, preferring yarns of different; materials, and it therefore follows that the particular yarn employed in the carrying out of the present invention is not an essential feature. thereof, although in the use of certain of the plastic yarns which are available and adaptable, advantage may be taken of the inherent char-- acteristics thereof such, for example, as the known heatfusibility of nylon and ,various other plastic yarns.

The principal difficulty encountered in attempting to make seamless woven bifurcated tubes for blood vessel replacements arises out of the desirability of the elimina tion of distortion, such a bulging or constriction, as well as leakage, at the place of branching from a larger tube: into two smaller ones.

The principal object therefore of the present invention is to provide a' further improvement in seamless woven. textile bifurcated tubes for use as artificial blood vessels employed by surgeons for the replacement of diseased. or damaged blood vessels at places where a larger tube: branches into two smaller ones.

A further object of the present invention is to provide woven bifurcated tubes to serve as blood vessel replacements in which there will be no objectionable bulgingy or constrictiongor likelihood of leakage, at the places: where such a tube branches from a single larger tube into two smaller tubes. I

A further object of the present invention is to provide, inbifurcated tubular replacements of the character aforesaid, improved means for interweaving and sealing,

at the place of branching of the tubes, the additional warp ends required in the smaller tubes to obtain the proper sizes thereof.

The nature and characteristic features of the present invention will be more readily understood from the following description, taken in connection withthe accompanying drawing forming part hereof, in which:

Figure 1 is an elevational view of a portion of a bifurcated woven textile tube, showing the initial step in the formation of the same, in accordance with the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a view somewhat similar to Fig. 1, but with the tubes reversed to operative condition, a portion of a branch tube being raised at the place of branching'to illustrate the interweaving of the additional warp ends required in the smaller tubes, and the sealing thereof to prevent leakage at that location; V

Fig. 3 is schematic or diagrammatic cross-section illustrating the manner of weaving the main tube;

Fig. 4 is a similar view illustrating the manner of weaving at the place where the branching occurs; and

Fig. 5 is a similar view illustrating the manner of weaving the branch tubes beyond the branching. i

It should, of course, be understood that the descrip tion and drawing herein areillustrative merely, and that various modifications and changes may be made in the structure and method disclosed without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Referring now more particularly to Fig. 1 of the drawing, there is there shown a portion of bifurcated tubing as initially Woven in accordance with the present invention, which consists of a larger or main tube 11, branching into two smaller tubes Hand 13. It should be understood that, for the best results, the cross-sectional area of the larger tube 11, when distended, should bear a certain relationship to the combined cross-sectional area of the branch tubes 12 and 13, when distended, and for this purpose it will be found that the number of warp ends re quired forweaving the main tube will be less than that required for theweaving of the tubes.

Asthe warp ends inlthe main tube 11 are necessarily less than the number used in the branch tubes 12 and 13, there will, during the weaving of the main tube 11," be an excess of; warp ends which may be internally floated during the weaving of the main tube.

The main tube 11, as well also as the branch tubes 12 and 13, are each woven in a manner similar to that used for weaving pillowcases and othertubular fabrics. In the simple form of such weaving, it is well known that at least two sheds must be formed, and one shed contains one more warp end than the other shed, thereby to avoidiinclusion of two warp ends between the successive crossings of the filling at one side from one shed to th other during the weaving.

In the weaving of the present product, as well as that shown and described in my previous application at least two shuttles are required, which are used in a manner to be presently explained. 'While both shuttles canbe used in the weaving of the main tube 11, it is preferable to use but a single shuttle for that purpose, as otherwise the controls would be more complicated.

The filling inserted in the weaving of the main tube 11 is'designated S this filling also being used in the weaving of a closure tab 26, and one of the branch tubes, whereas the filling inserted by the other shuttle is designated as S the same being used for the weaving of'the other branch tube. However, if desired, the filling S can be used for the weaving of the closure tab 26 in" lieu of the filling S as shown in'the drawing. .p-l Each of the branch tubes is thus'woven by a separate shuttle as indicated in Fig. 5 of the drawing, during the weaving of which the warp ends which have been floated during the weaving of the main tube 11, are subdivided, approximately one-half going into one of the branch tubes, and the other half going into the other of the branch tubes.

, For theproper formation of the fabric as above set forth, it necessary, in the weaving, that portions of the tubes 12 and 13 should overlap to the extent of the width in the shed of the warp ends which are internally floated duringthe weaving of the main tube 11.

A careful consideration of Figs. 3, 4 and 5 of the drawing will make clear the manner in which the weaving may be accomplished. V

It is, of course, well known that in the weaving of tubular fabrics such, for example, as pillow cases and the like, at least four harness frames must be employed, as two separate sheds must be successively formedfor the alternate passage of the shuttle therethrough, .and there should be one more warp end in one shedthan in the.

4 viously been used for the weaving of the main tube ll. h other e 3 is formed in a m nn r, in t is instance, the lower cloth being formed by interweaving othershed as, otherwise, there wouldbetwo warp ends included between successive crossings of the filling a one of the sides during the weaving. 1 1

As hereinbefore setforth, in the-weaving of bifurcated tubes in accordance withthe present invention, a greater number of warp ends are required in the branch tubes 12 and 13 than in the main tube 11, and consequently there will be an excess of warp ends'during the weaving of the main tube 11, which warp ends are internally floated. during the weaving of the main tube 111.

The warp ends which are floated during the weaving of the main tube 11, at the branching of the single tube into the two branch tubes, are manipulated, in ;the present invention, to successively formsingle sheds, each inter rbeing interwoven with the filling at the branching to form .the sealing tab 26;.

It should, however, be understood that the filling, 1

the filling S from the second shuttle with the warp ends 20 and 21 hereinbefore described as being used in connec: tion with the weaving of the main tube 11. The right end i of the upper cloth of the tube 13 is formed by the inter the remaining porton of the top cloth of tube 13 at the left end thereof isformed by. the interweaving of said filling S with the warp, ends 24 and 25. controlled by their I respective harness frames.

Referring now toFig. '4 of the drawing, there is there shown diagrammatically a preferred manner of weaving at the place whree the branching'occurs. It will benoted that at this place, in the present invention, the warp ends 22, 23,. 24 andf25 are interwoven preferably with the fil ing: S or with the-fill g S ,.it desired, t e y P viding a woven tab26 for a purpose to be presently ex-. plained, which tab is initially j disposed interiorly and very tightly woven. During the weaving of the tab 26, the cloth feed of the loom may be stopped and the tab 26 woven during a. short run of approximately ten picks.

During the weaving of the main tube 11, the warp ends 22, 23, 24 and 25 are floated interiorly as indicated'in Figs. 1 and3 of the drawing. However, in the present invention the tab 26 is woven as aforesaid, and the yarns used are preferably of the heat-fusible or scalable type, whereby the threads forming the tab. 26. may be subsequently fused or joinedto each other.

'For. the purpose of further elfectingthe sealing by uniting the threads of the tab 26 to each other, the tubes should be turned inside out in any preferred manner to the arrangement indicated in Fig. 2 of the drawing. When in this condition the threads forming the tab2 6 may be secured to each other by the heat-fusing or, if preferred,

' ,picks at the time the floating threads above .referred to are t Referring now more particularly to 3 of thetdrawing, :Which illustrates diagrammatically the weaving of the main tube portion 11 of .the fabric,'at :which time one set of warpends 14 is controlled by one harness frame,

and anothersetof warp ends 15 is controlled by another harnessirameto form successive sheds for weaving the portion .of-the 'top'cloth .at the center and left end. -Another set of warp ends 16-is controlled by another harness frame, anda corresponding set of warp ends 17 is conmay be joined by a suitable adhesive, or any other preferredmeans maybe used to close the fabric at the place of branching t After the sealing has been effected, the lose warp ends 22, 23, 24 and 25 may be separated into groups'and tied trolled by :another harness frame to complete the weaving .of thetopcloth ofthe main tube. 11. For the purpose of weaving the bottom cloth of the main .tube 11 .there is .provideda set of warp ends18 and a;corresponding set of warp ends '19, each setbeing con trolled;by aharness'frame for the purpose ofsuccessively shedding .the same "to weave the portion of the bottom cloth of the main tube 11 at theleft end-of Fig. 4.- "For weaving the remaining portion of the=bottom cloth of the tube e121is1formed by the interweaving of the filling S g from zonetof .the shuttles with the wvarp ends 14 and15. The'left portion ofthe bottomcloth'of tube l-2 is=formed bysthe interweaving of said fillingwith-the warp ends 18 V and 19.

The remaining portion of the bottom cloth -oftube 12 is formed by thelinterweaving-o'f two setsof-warp-ends 22-.and;;23, each:controlled bra-separate harness frame,

in a series of knots, as at28, after'which the free ends of the warps may be severed 'fromthe tab 26, as they are of no further use and .wouldbe objectionable in the finished structure. It willbe found that in some instances the knotting of the free ends of the warps will not be required, particularly if. the fusing or adhesion of these warps is done properly. v a

By theforegoing arrangement and method ofweaving there is provided an improved form of woven bifurcated tube particularly adaptable 5 for; surgical use in the replacement of diseased and damaged blood vessels. Such bifurcated tubes have been foundto be very effective for their indicated purpose.

I claim:

a l. A seamless "woven bifurcated tubular device in i which the number of interwoven warps in the .main tube is less than the total number of warps in the smaller tubes, and in which the excess warps are interwoven with filling into a single closuretab at theplace of branching of the smaller tubes from the main tube.

2. A seamless woven bifurcated tubular device .in

with filling into a single closure tab at the place :of the branch of the smaller tubes from the main -tube, and

in which certain of the yarns in said closure tab are of the heatsealabletype and are fused at the place of the branching. 3 i

3. A seamless woven bifurcated tubular device. in

which the number of interwoven warps in the main tube is less than the number of warpsinthe smaller tubes, in

are

which the excess warps are interwoven with filling into a single closure tab at the placeof the branching of the smaller tubes from the main tube, and in which certain of the yarns in said closure tab are secured to each other.

4. A seamless woven bifurcated tubular device in which the number of warps in the main tube is less than the total number of warps in the smaller tubes in which the excess warps are interwoven with filling into a single closure tab at the place of branching of the smaller tubes from the main tube, and in which certain of the yarns in said closure tab are of heat-sealable type and are fused to each other.

5. The method of weaving seamless bifurcated tubes which consists in floating a plurality of warps during the weaving of the main tube, utilizing the warps which have been floated as aforesaid to form portions of the fabric of each of the branch tubes, and at the branching of the tubes, interweaving the filling for a short run with the warps which are floated as aforesaid, to form a single tab for sealing the tubes at the branching.

6. The method of weaving seamless bifurcated tubes which consists in floating a plurality of warps during the weaving of the main tube, utilizing the warps which have been floated as aforesaid to form portions of the fabric of each of the branch tubes, and at the branching of the tubes interweaving the filling for a short run with the warps which are floated as aforesaid to provide a single closure tab, and cutting off the loose portions of the floating ends beyond said tab.

7. The method of weaving seamless bifurcated tubes which consists in floating a plurality of warps'during the weaving of the main tube, utilizing the warps which have been floated as aforesaid to form portions of the fabric of each of the branch tubes, and at the branching of the tubes interweaving the filling for a short run with the warps which are floated as aforesaid to form a' fabric of each of the branch tubes, and at the branching of the tubes interweaving the filling for a short run with the warps which are floated as aforesaid to form a single closure tab, certain of the yarns employed in weaving said tab having heat-scalable qualities, heatsealing said yarns to each other, and cutting 01f the loose portions of the floating ends beyond said tab.

9. The method of weaving seamless bifurcated tubes which consists in floating a plurality of warps during the weaving of the main tube, utilizing certain of the warps which have been floated as aforesaid to form portions of the fabricof each of the branch tubes, and at the branching of the tubes interweaving the filling for a short run with the, warps which are floated as aforesaid to form a single closure tab, certain of the yarns employed in weaving said tab having heat-sealable qualities, heat-sealing said yarns to each other, tying the free end portions of said floating warps into a series of knots at the end of said tab, and cutting the loose pottions of said floating warps beyond said knots.

References Cited the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,046,039 Schaar June 30, 1936

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2046039 *Aug 4, 1934Jun 30, 1936Arnold SchaarTextile article
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3095017 *Jul 14, 1959Jun 25, 1963Us Catheter & Instr CorpWoven articles
US3142067 *Feb 16, 1961Jul 28, 1964William J LiebigSynthetic vascular implants
US4503568 *Nov 25, 1981Mar 12, 1985New England Deaconess HospitalSmall diameter vascular bypass and method
US5904714 *Nov 24, 1997May 18, 1999Meadox Medicals, Inc.Shaped woven tubular soft-tissue prostheses and methods of manufacturing
US6136022 *Feb 9, 1999Oct 24, 2000Meadox Medicals, Inc.Shaped woven tubular soft-tissue prostheses and methods of manufacturing the same
US6596023Jul 7, 2000Jul 22, 2003Meadox Medicals, Inc.Shaped woven tubular soft-tissue prostheses and method of manufacturing the same
US6821294Dec 12, 2002Nov 23, 2004Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Shaped woven tubular soft-tissue prostheses and method of manufacturing the same
US6840958May 14, 2003Jan 11, 2005Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Shaped woven tubular soft-tissue prostheses and method of manufacturing the same
US7550006Dec 12, 2002Jun 23, 2009Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Shaped woven tubular soft-tissue prostheses and method of manufacturing the same
US8728151Dec 15, 2008May 20, 2014Aesculap AgWoven textile vascular prosthesis
USRE40404Dec 15, 1999Jun 24, 2008Maquet Cardiovascular, LlpThinly woven flexible graft
EP2074960A1 *Dec 17, 2008Jul 1, 2009Aesculap AGWebbed textile stent
WO1997043983A1 *May 20, 1997Nov 27, 1997Meadox Medicals IncShaped woven tubular soft-tissue prostheses and methods of manufacturing
Classifications
U.S. Classification139/387.00R
International ClassificationA61F2/06, D03D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationD03D2700/03, A61F2002/065, D03D3/00, A61F2/06
European ClassificationD03D3/00, A61F2/06