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Publication numberUS2924902 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 16, 1960
Filing dateJul 11, 1958
Priority dateJul 11, 1958
Publication numberUS 2924902 A, US 2924902A, US-A-2924902, US2924902 A, US2924902A
InventorsRaymond T Luck, Guyer Reynolds
Original AssigneeNat Dairy Prod Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
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US 2924902 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 16; 1960 R. T. LUCK ET AL 2,924,902

DISPLAY Filed July 11, 1958 INVENT Rs. ff a J WW f 'tv fi v Za.

DISPLAY Raymond T; Luck, Chicago, lll., and Reynolds G uyer,

i The present invention relates generally to merchandising displays, and more particularly, to an illuminated merchandising display associated with a price molding. 1 Various plans have been employed in the past to attract consumers to a new or existing line ofmerchandise. However, one of the most effective approaches isa point I of sale attraction which will particularly draw the attentionof the customer to a desired item or line of items. 1 r In :this connection, the modern retail trend is to the 'self-service supermarket in which the customer isencouraged to browse about and to make his own choice from a wide'selection of commodities.

The self-service marketing of goods has found wide acceptance and is presently carried on in the grocery, drug beverage and other merchandising areas. These supermarkets are usually laid out with rows of shelving displaying the goods for sale and in some instances, a bank of refrigerators or freezers are also employed to store a line of chilled or frozen products.

Because of the wide variety of items and brands cartied in self-service supermarkets, customers have often experienced ditficulty locating a desired article or brand. .For example, there are many brand names in the jelly ,and preserve field, and some of these brands include as many as twenty five differentvarieties. Thus, it becomes apparent that it is desirable to provide an inexpensive attention attracting display to identify lines of merchandise as well as items of merchandise in a given line.

Accordingly, the principal object of the present in- I vention is the provision of a means of merchandise identification. A further object of the invention is the provision of a means of merchandise identification which is inexpensive and yet which provides an attraction to the eye.

Another object of the present invention is the pro- :vision of a marketing display of the type characterized above which is simple and easy to erect, which is economical and extremely flexible, and which may be arranged in series to feature a complete line of merchandisc, I

A further object is the provision of an illuminated merchandising display which is mounted on the price molding attached to supermarket shelving and which may include provision for illumination.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will 'be understood by the reference to the following description and the accompanying drawings wherein there is' illustrated a merchandising display arrangement in accordance with the present invention.

In the drawings: I a

Figure 1 is a front elevational view of a portion of a supermarket shelving unit including a display arrange- United States Patent O ment embodying various of the features of the present invention;

Figure 3 is a sectional view taken along line 3--3 of Figure 2;

Figure 4 isa sectionalview taken along line 4-4 of Figure 2; and

' Figure 5 is an enlarged sectional view taken along line 5-5 of Figure 2.

The merchandising display illustrated in the drawings is representative of a wide range of presentations which may be employed inthe marketing of various products. The arrangement disclosed for intensifying consumer appeal is advantageously fashioned to attract the attention of customers to a featured article or line of merchandise and comprises basically, a pair of spaced apart rails 11 and 13 which forma price molding 15, alight source 17 located between the rails, and a translucent shield .19 carried upon the price molding by engagement between the spaced apart rails and disposed in overlying relation to the light source.

Merchandising displays embodying the features of this invention may be employed in the marketing of toiletries, food products, household supplies and other like commodities. The particular embodiment described herein and shown in the drawings is directed to the merchandising of jellies and preserves, but it should be understood that the principles disclosed can be applied to effectively market any of a wide selection of articles ordinarily carried in retail stores.

In the common arrangement employed in retail stores, the price molding is usually secured along the longitudinal edge of a shelf 21, as shown in Figure 1, which carries the featured merchandise. The price molding 15, as shown in Figure 2, includes generally a central web section 23 having upper and lower flanges which are inwardly directed in opposed relation to thereby define the pair of spaced apart and generally parallel rails 11 and 13. The spaceor opening included between the retroverted flanges and the central web section provides upper and lower generally parallel channels 11a and 13a for receiving the shields and other components'of the disclosed merchandising display. The price moldings may be formed in a variety of ways from any number of available materials and maybe suitably secured to a supporting surface in numerous ways well known in the art. Of course, price moldings are employed in other places other than alongthe edges of shelves, as for instance they may be incorporated on freezers, ice boxes, food stands and various other merchandising structures.

The shields 19 may be fabricated and defined in a wide variety of fashions. The particular shields employed in the present disclosure have been fabricated by vacuum forming from a light, flexible, and translucent plastic to present an appealing three dimensional representation of a fruit, such as an apple or a cluster of grapes, from which the featured jelly or preserve is produced. The translucent property of the shields permits illumination thereof to effectively attract the attention of shoppers in the store. In addition, the shields are artistically colored in varying shades to present a realistic and inviting facsimile of the desired fruit.

A typical shield 19, such as shown in Figure 2, includes a central section 25 which embodies the attention attracting representationpand a pair of generally rectangular end portions 27 and 29 which extend outwardly of the central section 25 The height of the generally rectangular portions 27 and 29 is slightly less than the distance between therails '11 and 13 of the price molding, and

in addition, the rectangular portions 27 and 29 each have extending outwardly'therefrom an upper and lower flange 31 and 33,:respectively, designed to be snapped into engagement within the rails to position the shield thereon. The upper and lower flanges 31 and 33 extend from the outer ends of the rectangular portions 27 and 29 to a point adjacent to but spaced from thecentral section 25. This spacing between the flanges and the central section rectangular portions and .the centrahweb (23 of the price molding. If desired, one or both of the rectangular portions 27 and 29 of the shield may also'carry, as shown at 35 in Figure l, a legend identifying'the product being merchandised. Thus, as the rectangular portions of the readily observable.

The outer ends of the curved or bowed portions 27 and 29 are closed by a generally. flat end flange 36 having a substantially stiff edge in generally co-planar relatlon with the upper and'lower flanges or spaced slightly outwardly" from the plane of the flanges. Whtn the shield is mounted on the price moldingfthe stilf edge of the end flange 36 lies adjacentthe central web of the price moldingand may be utilizedtd retain the, electrical cord between the price molding rails.

The merchandising appeal of the shields may be greatly increased by the provision of a. source of illumination between the price rails and thecovering shields.

'Such illumination may be accomplished-ma wide variety standard commercially available parts.

As pictured in the drawings, the illumination is provided by a socket 37 and bulb 39 carried on an electrical cord 41 which is retained between the price rails 11 and 13 by suitable means.

Numerous types of sockets are commercially available for employmrnt with abulb and an electrical cord to provide a suitable light source However, variouslof" the advantageous features ofthe disclosed arrangement may be readily secured by the utilization of a pin-type As is well-known, i this pre-. .Jferred type of socket includes a main body'45 having 'a pair of generally aligned'rec'esses 47 therein atone end 1 candelabra base socket.

(see Figure'S), and a bulb receiving opening 49 at the other end. Each of the recesses 47 is formed to admit one of the strands of the electrical cord 41 and has located therein a sharpened pin 51 for piercingthe insulation of the electrical cordand for contacting the current carrying wires contained within the insulation. The socket main body is secured to the electrical cordto efiect electrical contact between the pins 51 and the current carrying wire by means of a screw-type cap 53 and lower edges within the rails. which results will retain the electrical cord 41 between 4 of the display, however, in view of the coloring of the shields, the use of an uncolored bulb is preferred.

Any electrical cord. having the requisite flexibility and current carrying capacity may be employed. Satisfactory results have been achieved by the use of an eighteen gauge, double strand, plastic coated electric wire which is suitable for use with the described pin-type sockets.

Of course, the electrical cord 41 may be retained between the rails by a variety of suitable means. For instance, a particularly strong adhesive tape may be employed 'to secure thecord to'the central web 23 of the price molding. Or, a strip of stilf board may be inserted within the rails to contain the electrical cord in proper position, In addition, the stilt edge of the shield end flanges 36 may also bev employed to assist in retaining the electrical cord between the rails of the price molding. However, the disclosed embodiment utilizes a gen erally rectangular clip ,54 which is formed of thin resilient metallic sheet material, and which is particularlylocated to either side of the socket and bulb to effectively support their additional weight. However, the sockets and bulbs might be supported by the employment of a bracket on which the socket is mounted and which may be inserted between the rails of the price molding.

The clips 54 have a height somewhat greater than the distance between the rails, and are therefore engaged therebetween by flexing of the clips to position the upper The engagement the clips, 54 and the price molding 15 without any possibility of the ohm or cord being displaced from their position. relative to the price molding. The clips, of

course, may be spaced as preferred to maintain the cord betweenthe rails of the price molding. In addition, the clips may be removed and re-employed as desired.

When setting up a display arrangement along the price molding, such as shown in Figure 1, the electrical cord 41 is first convenientlysecured between the rails 11 and .13 by the use of the clips 54. After deciding upon the 40- .achieve the most effective arrangement, the pin type location and spacing between the illuminated shields to sockets 37 maybe attached totheelectrical cord 41 at each of the desiredlocations along the price molding.

Satisfactory results have been found in securing the electrical cord to the price molding by using a clip 54 to either side of the socket in order to provide adequate support for the additional weight of the socket and bulb. The bulbs may then be screwed into the sockets and the shields engaged with the price molding. As has been noted, the rectangular portions 27 and 29 of the flexible shield are formed with flanges 31 and 33 which may be snapped into engagement with the price molding rails to dispose the shields in overlying and covering relation which may be joined to the main body of theso'cketlin 'well as' in the spacing between sockets. 'Moreover, the

use of this type of socket permitsremoval or repositioning of thesocket as desired in order to accommodate any change in spacing which maybe desired as a result of the sales experience of the merchandised product or for other greasons.

Variousbulbs are available on the market which lmay be suitably connected to the socket. vHowever, in

this disclosed embodiment, va'five watt bulbhas been found to provide highly satisfactoryillumination without generating an undesirable amountof heat. Bulbsof ,various colors may be employed to heighten the appeal to the sockets and bulbs. ,When thus disposed, the shields will each completely cover and enclose the socket and bulb, the clips, and portions of the cord located there behind. In addition, the edges of the rectangular portion flanges 36 will bear against the electrical cord to assist in retaining thecord between the rails of the price molding.

. For purposes of concealing the electrical cord disposed along the price molding and extending between shields, a covering strip or strips 55 (see Figure 1) maybe engaged Within the rails Hand 13. The strips may be'of paper, plasticor other suitable material, may be of any desired length, and of a width to afford engagement within the rails andto adequately hide or mask the electricalcord. The strips 55 may be placed in edge to edge relation to "each other and to the shields, or may be placed in overlying end relation to each other as desired. Moreover, the strips may be providedwith suitable advertising'media or identifying' indicia" as may seem most desirable. Fi-

:nally, price numerals 57 maybeinserted between the rails and over the strips55*asdesired, in order to' properly rndtcate the priceofthe article being merchandis'ed.

Mn Ml When the merchandising display has been set up along the price molding, the electrical cord which is provided at one end with a male plug 56 may be suitably connected to a source of current to illuminate the display. Of course, previous to this, the other end of the electrical cord has been suitably taped or otherwise insulated to prevent a shortcircuit.

Added attractiveness may be obtained by the incorporation of a flashing of pulsating illumination effect. This effect may be accomplished in numerous ways including the utilization of electric bulbs provided with individual internal means for automatically accomplishing the desired flashing, the incorporation of a flasher in the circuit, or by plugging the electrical cord into a control box equipped with a suitable means for interrupting the current, such as indicated by the numeral 57 in Figure 1.

One of the most effective uses of the present invention is the featuring of an entire line of food products with particular emphasis being placed upon certain items within the line. In this circumstance, the entire length of the price molding may be employed to present an integrated merchandising display which is very effective in attracting customers attention to the complete line and which is highly successful in effecting increasedsales of the featured articles as well as the entire line.

Whether the arrangement described is employed to feature an entire line of products or whether a single product is merchandised by use of the present invention, increased customer response and enlarged sales volume are achieved. Moreover, these benefits are achieved as a result of a very small expenditure as the various components employed are either commercially available at low cost, or are readily and simply fabricated without excessive costs. In addition, the simplicity and ease of assembly as well as the facility for removal, reuse and repositioning contribute to the advantages of the described merchandising display.

In addition to the various modifications mentioned above, still other additional changes and modifications may be made in the disclosed construction to achieve certain of the features mentioned herein without departing from the principles of the present invention.

We claim:

1. In combination, a price mold having a pair of spaced apart rails, a source of illumination carried by said price molding between said rails, and a translucent merchandising shield engaged by said rails and disposed in overlying relation to said source for illumination thereby.

2. In combination, a price mold having a pair of spaced apare rails, an illumination source carried by said price molding between said rails, and a three-dimensional translucent merchandising shield engaged by said rails and disposed in overlying relation to said illumination source, said shield having top and bottom flanges for engagement with said rails to thereby atford positioning of said shield.

3. In combination, a price mold having a pair of spaced apart rails, a light source retained between said rails, a three-dimensional translucent merchandising shield engaged by said rails and disposed in overlying relation to said light source for illumination thereby, and means for interrupting said light source to effect alternate discontinuance and reactivation of the illumination of said shield.

4. A merchandising display comprising a price mold having a pair of spaced apart rails, an electrical cord disposed along said price molding between said rails and connected to a source of electrical energy, a plurality of clips engaged by said rails, said clips retaining said electrical cord in position along said price molding, a bulb receiving socket secured to said cord, a bulb in said socket, and a translucent merchandising shield engaged by said rails and disposed in covering relation to said socket and bulb.

5. A merchandising display carried on a price molding having a pair of spaced apart rails and including an electrical cord disposed between said rails, a plurality of clips engaged by said rails and maintaining said electrical cord therebetwcen, a bulb receiving socket on said cord, a bulb in said socket, a translucent merchandising shield disposed in covering relation to said socket and bulb, said shield including end portions having top and bottom flanges in engagement with said rails, a source of electrical energy connected to said cord, a plurality of strips held by said rails and extending from each of the ends of said shield to thereby conceal said underlying cord and clips, and price numerals engaged between said rails in overlying relation to said strips.

6. A merchandising display arranged along a pair of spaced apart rails which form a price molding and including an electrical cord disposed between said rails and connected to a source of electrical energy, a plurality of pin type sockets secured to said cord in spaced relation therealong, a bulb in each of said sockets, a plurality of clips engaged by said rails for retaining said cord, sockets and bulbs between said rails, a plurality of translucent merchandising shields engaged within said rails, one of said shields being disposed in covering relation to each of said bulbs and sockets for illumination thereby, means for simultaneously discontinuing and reactivating the illumination of each of said shields, a plurality of strips engaged within said rails and extending from the ends of said shields to thereby conceal said underlying cord and clips, and price numerals held by said rails in overlying relation to said strips.

7. A merchandising display arranged along a price molding defined by a central web having an upper and lower retroverted flange and including an electrical cord disposed between said flanges and connected to a source of electrical energy, a plurality of pin type sockets secured to said cord in spaced relation therealong, a bulb in each of said sockets, a plurality of clips engaged by said flanges for retaining said cord, sockets and bulbs between said flanges, a plurality of translucent merchandising shields each having a central section embodying an attractive representation of the product merchandised and a pair of generally rectangular end portions extending outwardly from said central section, said rectangular portions having flanges projecting from the upper and lower edges thereof in engagement with said price molding flanges to position said shields along said price molding, said rectangular end portions being outwardly curved between said upper and lower edges to space said portions from said central web of said price molding, one of said shields being disposed in covering relation to each of said bulb and sockets for illumination of the central section and end portions of said shield, means for simultaneously discontinuing and reactivating the illumination of each of said shields, a plurality of strips engaged within said price molding flanges and extending from the ends of said shields to thereby conceal said underlying cord and clips, and price numerals held by said price molding flanges in overlying relation to said strips.

. 8. In a merchandise display shelf having a price molding along the outer edge thereof including vertically spaced apart rails, the improvement comprising a light source detachably mounted between said rails, and a three dimensional merchandise shield, comprising a pictorial representation of the goods displayed on said shelf, which is detachably mounted on said rails in overlying relation to said light source.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,178,634 Howenstine Nov. 7, 1939 2,297,888 Heileman Oct. 6, 1942 2,346,779 Muehling Apr. 18, 1944 2,646,497 Burnbaum July 21, 1953 2,787,070 Idoine Apr. 2, 1957

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2178634 *Jun 13, 1938Nov 7, 1939Neon Products IncIlluminated advertising device
US2297888 *Jul 10, 1940Oct 6, 1942Wickersham Press IncPrice tag indicator
US2346779 *Oct 21, 1941Apr 18, 1944Julius J MuehlingPrice card rack
US2646497 *Dec 2, 1950Jul 21, 1953Bradford Novelty Co IncIlluminated decoration with reflector
US2787070 *Sep 7, 1954Apr 2, 1957Robert B IdoineMap holder
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3084463 *Aug 17, 1960Apr 9, 1963Guyer ReynoldsLighted shelf strip
US3086308 *Jun 29, 1959Apr 23, 1963Westlake G TernouthShelf-edge sign
US3159937 *Sep 27, 1962Dec 8, 1964L P T Systems IncAdvertising device
US3248494 *Aug 5, 1963Apr 26, 1966L P T Systems IncCombination switch and bulb mounting
US4002886 *Jun 20, 1975Jan 11, 1977Ronald Murl SundelinElectronic price display unit
US5111606 *Jun 11, 1990May 12, 1992Reynolds Randy BAt-shelf lighted merchandising display
US5444930 *Aug 16, 1993Aug 29, 1995Design Display Group, Inc.Point of purchase channel display sign with electroluminescent lamp
US6202334Jan 28, 1999Mar 20, 2001Randy ReynoldsPoint-of-purchase advertising by a cantilevered display mechanism and related methods
US6438882Mar 6, 1995Aug 27, 2002Randy B. ReynoldsLighted flexible display device having a battery supply mount
US6829854Mar 19, 2001Dec 14, 2004Randy B. ReynoldsLighted flexible display device having a battery supply mount
Classifications
U.S. Classification40/541, 40/5, 40/649, 362/122, 362/249.1, 40/540, 362/812
International ClassificationG09F3/20
Cooperative ClassificationY10S362/812, G09F3/20
European ClassificationG09F3/20