Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2925149 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 16, 1960
Filing dateJun 17, 1957
Priority dateJun 17, 1957
Publication numberUS 2925149 A, US 2925149A, US-A-2925149, US2925149 A, US2925149A
InventorsCharles R Hughson
Original AssigneeHyster Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Counterweighted vehicle
US 2925149 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 16, 1960 Filed June 17, 1957 c. R. HUGHSON 2,925,149

COUNTERWEIGHTED VEHICLE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. CHARLES R. HUGHSON Feb. 16, 1960 c. R. HUGHSON COUNTERWEIGHTED VEHICLE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 17, 1957 FIG.6

Fl G.3

' nvmvron CHARLES R. HUGHSON ATTORNEYS V COUNTERWEIGHTED VEHICLE Charles R. Hughson, Portland, reg., assignor, by. mesne assignments, to Hyster Company, a corporation of Nevada Application June 17, 1957, Serial No. 666,047 7 Claims. (Cl. 187-9) This invention relates to vehicles, such as industrial lift trucks, which require counterweighting in order to prevent tipping of the vehicle when the vehicle is being operated.

There has been an increasing demand for a lift truck in which the counterweight or counterweights may be quickly and easily removed. One reason for this is that when transporting industrial lift trucks, particularly the heavier models, frequently the crane or other hoisting device does not have sufficient capacity to lift the entire truck safely. Thus it becomes necessary to 'remove a part of the truck,and this has proved a time consuming and thus expensive operation.

It has also been the practice in recent years to transport lift trucks by air, and sometimes to unload lift trucks from ships by means of a helicopter. In many instances, the lift trucks are too heavy to be carried conveniently in their entirety and thus partial disassembly of the truck is required. There are also various other reasons not necessary to mention for requiring the separation of the truck into two or more assemblies which may be readily transported singly.

Heretofore, counterweights in lift trucks and similar vehicles have not been, in general, readily removable, and in many instances have been permanently secured in place. In other instances, when removal has not been too difiicult, it has been found that the truck may not be lightened sufficiently by removal of the counterweight, because the truck has also been counterweighted by making certain operating parts, such as wheel-support assemblies and braces. of massive form. Thus further disassembly of the truck has been necessary.

It is a main object of the present invention to provide a lifttruck having a counterweight which is more readily removable thancounterweights of prior trucks.

Another object of the invention is to provide a lift truck in which the counterweigh'ting material is concentrated in. a single unitary piece which is readily removable. Y l

A further object of the invention is to provide 'a lift truck in which the counterweight is mounted in 'place in a simple and inexpensive manner.

Another object of the invention is to provide a truck in which all the'counterweightingmaterial is concentreated in a single piece, and in which the truck, although being composed of relatively minor slender parts, i's

so constructed that it may safely support the counterweight. 3

Another object of the invention is to provide an industrialr truck-in which the counterweight has a major portion thereof concealed and a minor portion exposed, and" in which. the exposed part blends into and forms a continuation of'the adjacent surfaces of the body so that the counterweight is unnoticeable.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a counterweight..equipped with fender well recesses for accommodating'certain wheels of the truck.

' Various other objectsof the invention'will beapparent rates Patent 0 "ice from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein:

Fig. l is a side view in elevation of a lift truck embodying the concepts of the present invention, showing the counterweight in place;

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the rear portion of the truck of Fig. 1 on a somewhat enlarged scale, showing the counterweight in the process of being removed;

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal mid-sectional view through the rear portion of the truck, except that certain parts are left partially or entirely in elevation;

Fig. 4 is a front elevational view of the counterweight, showing an associated part in dotted lines;

Fig. 5 is a top view of the counterweight and v Fig. 6 is a vertical section on an enlargedscale, taken along line 6-6 of Fig. -3, showing certain details of construction.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2, the particular truck shown includes a combined frame and body generally entitled 11 supported by driven front wheels 13 and steerable rear wheels 15. A mast 17, at the front of thetruck, guides a load carriage 19 for vertical movement, A conventional lift unit not shown, elevates the carriage and thus the load on the carriage forks. The load being lifted exerts a moment force tending to tilt the truck forwardly, and this tilting movement is counter.- balanced by a counterweight to be presently described.

The body 11 of the particular truclc disclosed is of unitary construction and includes vertical side walls 21 and 23, and a vertical rear wall 25 integrally joining the side walls as is most clearly apparent in Fig, 2. The side walls 21 havegenerally u shaped cutouts 27 formed therein to accommodate the rear wheels 15, asis clearly shown in Fig. 2. i i

A hood or cover assembly covers the, forward portion of the opening defined by the body walls 21, 23 and 25, and in the specific form shown the assembly includes a fixed cover plate 31 bolted" in place, in a manner not shown, to the body walls. The assembly also includes a hinged cover plate 33 which is connected as shown in Fig. 3 by a hinge 35 to the edge of a cross wall 37 which divides the body recess: into a front portion con taining the engine, and a rear portion whichcontains the counterweight of the truck, and which may. also contain a tank or tanks for holding fuel, hydraulic fluid and the like. Suc h tank or tanks are not disclosed in the drawings since they are of no importance to the present invention. The cross wall 37 is a permanent part of the unitary truck body. 1

The side and rear body walls 21, 23and 25, together with the cover plate 31, define a vertical recess or pocket,

open at the upper end thereof, as is apparent from Fig.-

2. A counterweight 41 slidablyfits within such recess and hasan upper exposedtop portion 43 which projects. outwardly at the sides and rear portions of the counter-- weight to provide a lip ofjdownwardly facing shoulder 45 which rests on the upper. edges of the side and rear body walls. The 'shoulderthus provides the entire.vertical support for the counterweight.

As is best shown in Figs. 1 and 3, the top portion 43 t of the counterweight' is formed so that thesurfaces there:

of merge in'an'd form a continuation of the adjacent surfaces of the body, including the side and .rearwalls and the cover plate 31. Thus the counterweight, although, partly exposed, is not unsightly.

The rear and side faces of the counterweight are formed complementally to the opposed. inner. faces of the side and rear body walls, except that such f aces are tapered downwardly and inwardly to facilitate ready insertion of the counterweightjinto aipocket provided by the body. The front face of the counterweight providesa flat verwalli-as is best shownhi Figs. 3, 4 and 5, which abuts against or is closely adjacent to the rear edge of thecover plate 31L The counterweight is provided with an extensive concave recess51 on; eaeh fr ont l ower corner thereof, and each recess registers vviththe associated cutout 2 7 in the side bodywall of the truck and definesa well for the associated rear wheel. a

Referring to Figs. 2,3 and 6, the counterweight 41 is fastened to the body by a pair of holding bolts 63, each of whichfits freely within a vertical slot 65, cut into the, side of the counterweight, and threads into a lug "67 fastened to the inner face of the adjacent side body wall. i a a Y 'The counterweight is provided with three heavy removable eyebolts 71 which have shank portions extending through holes formed in the topi facenof the counterweight and .extendinginto counter bores 73 formed; up- ,wardlylin the bottom tac of the eounterweight. A nut 75 threads onthe lower end of each bolt vand holds-it, in fplac'eI v V i V U ,Referring to Fig. 3, a central longitudinallyextendinglbraee intheforrn of altubular piece 81,. extends between and has its end portions permanently secured to the cross plate 37 and to the inner face of the rear body wall 25. The counterweight is provided with a deep channel 83 in the lower space thereof to accommodate the brace 81. The rear. wall 25 has an opening 85 therein registering with the opening in thetubularipiec-e 81, and a tow bar 87. istfixed in the; rear end of the tubular piece to enable the truck to be'towed when desired.

[A brace plate 89 extends between-and is secured to the supper surface of the brace 81 and the lower surface of the cover plate 31, as is best shown in Fig. 3.

The rear wheels 15 are mounted on a wheel support which includes apair of laterally and longitudinally extending spaced plates '91 and 93 connected together at the front and rear portions thereof by trunnion blocks 95. The blocks carry trunnions 97 and 98 which extend longitudinally of the truck, are positioned centrally of thetru'ck and are supported by spaced bearings 99. The rearrbearing 99 is permanently mounted on the inner face of the rear wall 25 and is also connected to the rear end of the brace 81. The front bearing 99 is permanently mounted on the rear face of the cross wall 37 and is connected to the front end of the brace 81.

Each rearwheel 15 is mounted by means of a kingpin assembly 107-to the adjacent side portions of the wheel support plates-91 and in a'conventional manner, not necessary to describe. A steering assembly 111, of conventional'eonstruc tion, isfragrnentarily shown in Fig. 3 and-is connected to the rear wheels to enable them to be turned or steered. The steering assembly may be partly supportedby the trunnion 98. 1 a v a The counterweight 41 may be removed in a matter of secondsrby removing the holding bolts 63, and fitting the hooks 115 of suitable lift chains 117 in the-eyes, of the eyebolts 71 and operating a hoisting unit connected to the chains. The counterweight may also be readilyiset back in place by merely lowering the sameinto the recess or pocket at the rear of the body, The :tapering of the counterweight aids its 'ready entranceainto the pocket.

lcl i M.

1. An industrial lift truck having a wheel-supported body, load engaging means ai the front of said truck tending to tip the truck when the truck is lifting a load, said body being formed with a vertical recess at the rear portion thereof open at the .upper end thereof, and a counterweight slidably fitting within said recess ma ve? tical direction ,and closing said recess; ,saidj Sliding fit serving to confine said counterweight against horizontal movement in either; lateral or a longitudinal direction, said counterweight having parts in vertical'thrust engage efit with said body for supporting said counterweight in a vertical direction, said counterwe1g ht having at least one concave depression formed therein providing a well for one of the'wheels of said body. v

2. An industrial lift truck having a body supported in a pair of rear wheels and one or more front wheels, lead engaging: means. at the'cfrbfi't or said. truck tending to up thertruck when the .truckis liftinga'load, :said body heirig formed'twith a vertical recess. at the rear portion thereof open at the upper end thereof, and a 'ceunte weight slidably fitting Within said recess in a vertical di rectiOn and closing said recess; said counterwmght having parts invertical thrust engagement with said body for supporting saidcoun'terweightrin a vertical d rect on; said counterweight having a concavedepression for each each rear wheel and providing a .wellzfor such wheel.

3-, .An industrial lift. truekhavir'lgr-a wheel-supported body,-:load engaging means atizthe front of sa d trl vi tending to tip the truck whenlthe-truck, is lIfl'Il'Ig aJQFRiE said body being formedwith a'vertical recess at the rear porti'on thereof open at the; upper end thereof, and a counterweight slidablyfitting within said recess in a verticalidirec'tion and closing said'recess said Slldll'lg fit serving to confine said counterweight against horizontal movement in either alateral or a longitudinal direction,

said counterweight having parts in vertical thrust engage ment with said body for supporting said counterweight in a vertical direction, said counterweight be ng tape rcd on the lower portion thereof to facilitaterready znsertlon of said portion into said recess, said counterweight hav= ing atleast' one concave depression-formed therein pr0- Viding a Well for one of the wheels of said body.

4. Avehicle having a wheel-supported body, means at one end vof said vehicle for performing an operation which. tends to tilt the other end of said vehicle upwardly, said :body being. formed with a vertical recess at' said other end, Said recess being open atv the upper'end thereof, said recessbeingdefined at least in part by a vertic lly extending wall, and .a counterweight slidably'fittlng within-,said recess in a'verticaldirection, said sliding fit serving to confine'said counterweight against horizontal movement ineither'a lateral'or alengitudinal direction,

The body is provided with twopairs of eyeplates 121 I and 123, as best shown in 'Figs. '1 and 2 ,by which the truck body may-be lifted independently of the counter- I, to be the preferred-j embodiment thereof; it-is de'siredthat it be 'unde'rstoodfthat'the invention is not to' be limited 7 other than the provisions;the following; ciaiins;

said counterweight having aportion thereof projecting upwardly out of said recess, said portion having laterally projecting parts to overlie the upper edge of said wail; said parts beingin vertical ithrust engagement with said edge for supporting said counterweight in a vertical direction, said portion having its exposed surfaceformed to simulate a continuation of the. adjacent surfaces of said body'so, thatsaid counterweightserves the. dual purpose of eounterweighting the vehicle and-also providing a portionof the exterior surface of said body.

5. Anfindustrial lift truck having a wheel-supported body, load engaging means at the front of said truc tending to tip the truck when the truck is lifting a load, saidibody being formed with a vertical recess at the rear portion thereof. open at the upper end thereof, and a counterweight slidably fitting within said recess in a verticaldirection and closing said recess, said counterweight having parts in vertical thrust engagement with said body for supporting said counterweight in a vertical direction,- said body includes spaced 'vertieal-. side walls and a vertical rear Wall connectingsaidside walls, a rqr gember gonn tingrsaid side walls forwardly of said recess, a longitudinal brace connecting said rear wall to said cross-member to reinforce said rear wall, said counterweight being formed with a notch within which said brace is accommodated.

6. An industrial lift truck having a wheel-supported body, load engaging means at the front of said truck tending to tip the truck when the truck is lifting a load, said body being formed with a vertical recess at the rear portion thereof open at the upper end thereof, a counterweight removably fitting within said recess in a vertical direction and closing said recess, and means engaging the sides of said counterweight serving to confine said counterweight against horizontal movement in either a lateral or a longitudinal direction, said counterweight having parts at the upper end thereof in vertical thrust engagement with portions of said body for suspending said counterweight from said body and within said recess, said counterweight having at least one concave depreSsion formed therein providing a well for one of the wheels of said body.

7. An industrial lift truck having a body supported by a pair of rear wheels and one or more front wheels, load engaging means at the front of said truck tending to tip the truck when the truck is lifting a load, said body being formed with a vertical recess at the rear portion thereof 6 open at the upper end thereof, a counterweight removably fitting within said recess in a vertical direction and having a cross-sectional area and form at. the location of the mouth of said recess to close the recess, said body presenting horizontal edge portions adjacent the upper end of said counterweight, said counterweight having laterally extending parts in vertical thrust engagement with such edges for suspending said counterweight within said recess from said body, said counterweight having an integral upper portion projecting upwardly beyond said recess, said upper portion being curved to simulate a continuation of the adjacent features of the body, said counterweight having a concave depression for each rear wheel and providing a well for such wheel, said body having portions in engagement with the sides of said counterweight to confine said counterweight against horizontal movement in either a lateral or a longitudinal direction.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,796,343 Pierson Mar. 17, 1931 2,299,445 Weaver Oct. 20, 1942 2,327,848 Schroeder Aug. 24, 1943 2,705,254 Middleton Mar. 29, 1955

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1796343 *Mar 1, 1926Mar 17, 1931Goodrich Co B FBattery hold-down and handle structure
US2299445 *Aug 13, 1941Oct 20, 1942Towmotor CoIndustrial truck
US2327848 *Jan 28, 1942Aug 24, 1943Yale & Towne Mfg CoIndustrial truck
US2705254 *Jan 2, 1952Mar 29, 1955Robert G MiddletonBattery and electrical conductor bracket therefor
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3029088 *Feb 16, 1959Apr 10, 1962Steinbock G M B H FaCounterweight for three wheel vehicles
US3367441 *Apr 1, 1966Feb 6, 1968Allis Chalmers Mfg CoUnitized battery case and counterweight
US3795330 *May 18, 1972Mar 5, 1974Caterpillar Tractor CoCounterweight suspension device
US4067415 *Dec 1, 1976Jan 10, 1978Towmotor CorporationLocking arrangement for counterweight
US4068876 *Apr 8, 1976Jan 17, 1978Caterpillar Tractor Co.Bumper and counterweight arrangement and method for assembling the same
US4153262 *Feb 24, 1977May 8, 1979Towmotor CorporationLifting eye and overhead guard mounting arrangement
US4216869 *Sep 21, 1977Aug 12, 1980Jlg Industries, Inc.Industrial crane
US4287966 *Nov 6, 1978Sep 8, 1981Missouri Research Laboratories Inc.Industrial truck
US4471975 *Nov 8, 1982Sep 18, 1984Towmotor CorporationCounterweight and axle mounting arrangement
US4540095 *Feb 23, 1984Sep 10, 1985Federal Motors, Inc.Counterweighted aerial trailer
US6296436 *Apr 8, 1997Oct 2, 2001Allied Gator, Inc.Multipurpose counterweight housing and counterweight
US6805527 *Oct 20, 1999Oct 19, 2004Linde AktiengesellschaftFork lift truck
US7168740 *Mar 26, 2004Jan 30, 2007Kabushiki Kaisha Toyota JidoshokkiStructure of mounting weight in forklift truck
WO1984001754A1 *Nov 8, 1982May 10, 1984Towmotor CorpCounterweight and axle mounting arrangement
Classifications
U.S. Classification187/222, 180/908, 212/195, 180/54.1, 280/759
International ClassificationB66F9/075
Cooperative ClassificationB60G2204/418, B66F9/07554, Y10S180/908, B60G2200/322
European ClassificationB66F9/075H