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Publication numberUS2927350 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 8, 1960
Filing dateAug 8, 1956
Priority dateAug 8, 1956
Publication numberUS 2927350 A, US 2927350A, US-A-2927350, US2927350 A, US2927350A
InventorsNelson Charles J
Original AssigneeTroy Blanket Mills
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of and apparatus for producing a felt-like fibrous material
US 2927350 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 8, 1960 C. J. NELSON METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING A FELT-LIKE FIBROUS MATERIAL Filed Aug. 8, 1956 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG.|

ymcw- ATTORNEY March 8, 1960 c. J. NELSON METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING A FELT-LIKE FIBROUS MATERIAL Filed Aug. s, 1956 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 MQE ATTO/ZNEY March 8, 1960 c. J. NELSON METHOD OF AND APP 2,927,350 ARATUS FOR PRODUCING A FELT-LIKE FIBROUS MATERIAL Filed Aug. 8, 1955 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. 7 (Aw/e5 Ne/son ATTORNEY nit Charles J. Nelson, Troy, N.H., assignor to Troy Blanket Mills, Troy, N.H., a corporation of New Hampshire Application August 8, 1956, Serial No. 602,826

13 Claims. (Cl. 19-163) This invention relates to a method of and apparatus for producing a felt-like fibrous material.

One object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved method of and apparatus for producing in a continuous manner a felt-like fibrous material wherein the angularity between the fibers is controlled to impart to the material predetermined tensile strength in diiferent directions.

. A further and more specific object is to provide a novel method of and apparatus for producing felt-like fibrous materials wherein the angularity between the fibers may be controlled to impart to the material substantially equal tensile strength in any direction.

With these general objects in view and such others as' may hereinafter appear, the invention consists in the method of and apparatus for producing a felt-like fibrous material and in the various structures, arrangements and combinations of parts hereinafter described and particularly defined in the claims at the end of this specification.

In the drawings illustrating the preferred embodiment of the invention:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of the present apparatus for producing a felt-like fibrous material in accordance with the present method;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation as viewed from the line 22 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a side elevation as viewed from the line 33 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a side elevtaion as viewed from the line 44 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is a detail view in side elevation of the edge combing mechanism for removing the folded edges of the web;

Fig. 6 is a plan view detail of a Web offibrous material passing through the edge combing mechanism; and

Fig. 7 is a detail end view of a marginal edge of the web after being combed.

In general the present invention contemplates a novel method of and apparatus for producing a felt-like fibrous material. In accordance with the present invention a sheet or veil-like web of carded fibrous material is delivered to a continuously moving receiving apron of a lapper. The carded web has its fibers disposed substantially parallel and extending in the direction of ad Vance of the web. The lapper is arranged to deposit successive folds or laps of the web on an accumulating apron or conveyer arranged at right angles to the advance of the carded web, the accumulating conveyer being arranged to travel at a rate of speed such as to dispose successive laps of the Web diagonally across the accumulating conveyer in crisscross relation as it is deposited on States ten Patented Mar. 8, 1960 extending substantially at right angles to each other and preferably at an angle of slightly less than as measured at the apiees of the triangular patterns adjacent the marginal edges of the two-ply web.

In accordance with one feature of the present invention the folded marginal edges of the two-ply web arethen removed, preferably by a combining action as distinguished from a cutting or shearing action, whereby to provide a two-ply web of substantially uniform thickness across the full width thereof. The web may then bev subjected to a longitudinal drawing or stretching operation as it is advanced, preferably continuously, to dispose the fibers in adjacent webs at an angle of slightly more than 90 at said apiees, the two-ply web then preferably being advanced on an adjoining conveyor at a relatively faster rate to accommodate the increased length; of the web effected by the drawing operation. In the illustrated apparatus the adjoining conveyer advances the drawn web to a second lapper which deposits successive folds or laps of the web on a second or final accumulating conveyer preferably arranged at right angles to the advance of the two-ply web. operation the second accumulating conveyor may advance at a relatively slow rate so as to build up a multi-ply web or batt of the desired thickness. Thereafter the multiply web is preferably subjected to a compressing and longitudinal drawing or stretching operation which is arranged to dispose the fibers of adjacent webs at substan tially right angles to each other and then the web is-- subjected to a needle punching operation preferably from.

both sides of the web. As a result of combing the marginal edges of the two-ply web to remove the folds therefrom the multi-ply web produced is rendered more uni-.-

material in staple form is placed in a standard weighing and feeding device of known structure indicated diagrammatically at 10 and which is arranged to deliver successive weighed loads ofthe staple fibers to a conventional single doifer Garnett or carding machine indicated generally at 12. The Garnett machine is arranged to deposit the carded fibers on a continuously moving slatted apron or conveyer 14 forming thereon a single layer or veil-like web 16 of the fibrous material with the fibers arranged substantially parallel and extended in the direction of advance of the conveyer 14. The veil-like Web 16 is delivered by the conveyer 14 to a lapper, also of conventional construction and which is indicated generally at 18, having conventional slatted top and bottom. aprons 20, 22 arranged to deposit the carded web 16 to between reciprocating guide rolls 24, 26 and thence to the upper surface of a slatted accumulating conveyer '28 travelling in a direction at right angles to the advance of the single layer web 16, and guide rolls 24, 26, the' path of the web being indicated by the dotted lines in Fig. 2.

The accumulating conveyer 28 is arranged to be driven In practice for continuous 45' it willv be seen that'the apex adjacent the marginal] edge of each triangular pattern will be slightly less than 90* so" that the individual fibers of adjacent laps are arranged diagonally in crisscross relation at such angles? I In practice it is preferred to adjust the speed of the accumulating conveyer 28' with relation. to the rate of deposit of the" webonto the accumulating" conveyer such as: to" produce triangular patterns having apex angles adjacent opposed marginal edges of the two-ply web of between 74" and 78. It will be apparent that such angular disposition may vary with difierent relative speeds of the-lapping mechanism and the accumulating conveyer when different width'sof two-ply webs are produced, the important feature being that a two-ply web is formed having triangular patterns with the leading marginal edge of one diagonal lap coinciding substantially with that trailing marginal edge of a previously deposited diagonal lap which extends in the same diagonal direction.

The. general construction of the garnetting machine 12 and the lapping machine 18, including the driving mechindi'c'ate'd' generally at 32, may be of conventional form; and the drivingmechanism may include an electric motor" 33 connected by a belt 35 to a shaft 37. The 1 39 to a conventional traversing gear housing 41 for operating the upper and lower'tra'versing aprons. The construction and operation of such machines are well known, as indicated in the United States patent to- Rundle'tt, No.- 1-,9-78,3'5'5, issued October 23, 1934, so that a detailed description of such machines and the drives therefor is deemed unnecessary for understanding the present invention.

In" the continued operation of the apparatus, as illustrated in Figs. 1 and 3, the two ply triangular patterned webso havin folded marginal edges 44, 46 is transferred from the accumulating conveyor 28 to' edge combing mechanism indicated generally'at 36 and which includes arelatively large diameter driven roller 38 of'a length slightly less tha'n'the width of the two-ply web and a pair-of cooperating weighted idler rolls 40, 42, one at each-end of the roller 38 with the outer face of each idler-"roll disposed flush with the ends of the roller 38. In operation'asthe two-plyweb is passed between the rollers the folded marginal edges 44, 46 of the web 'e'xtending'beyond the ends of the roller 38 are subjected to= a combing operation, as indicatedin detail in Figs. 5- and' 6, to remove the folded edges, thus eliminating the increased thickness normally occurring at such folds. As herein shown, the combing action may' be performed by a vibratory doft'er comb 48 which maybe actuated by conventional eccentric vibrating mechanism indicated generally at 50in Fig; 5 and driven by a belt connection from a motor 52. As also indicatedin Fig. 5, each idler roll 40, 42, one of which. is shown, maybe ina shaft. 56. journalled in a bracket 58 attached. to a transverse. girt 60' which may be supported. between standards 62 upon which the eccentric vibrating mechanisms. 50 are mounted. As illustrated in 6. and 7;. the

combing; operation removes the. folded edges leaving a.

will; be described. The waste material; removed from dividnall'y supported on an arm 54 pivotally mounted on;

speed of the first pair of. drawing rollers.

the edges may be received into the open end of a suction pipe indicated at 64 to be carried away from the machine. In practice the surface speed of the large roller 38 corresponds to the linear speed of the accumulating conveyer 28, the path of the material being indicated by dotted lines in Fig. 3. The driving mechanism for the roller 38 of the combining mechanism and for the accumulating conveyer 28 includes a variable speed drive mechanism indicated generally at 87 and having an output shaft connected by a chain and sprocket drive 88 to an intermediate shaft 90 which in turn is connected to a shaft 92 on: which the drive pulley for the accumulating conveyer 28 is mounted. The shaft 92 is in turn connected by a chain and sprocket drive 94 to a shaft 96 upon which the large diameter roller 38 of the combing mechanism is mounted, the driving connections thus far described being arranged to drive the accumulating conveyer 28 andthe roller38 at corresponding rates of speed to advance the two-ply web at a uniform rate.

From the description thus far it will be seen that a two-ply lapped Web 30 is produced having successive 'laps arranged in triangular patterns with the fibers of one ply disposed at an angle of about 78, for example, with relation to the fibers in the other ply as measured at the apices of the triangular patterns adjacent opposed marginal edges of. the two-ply web and that the web is then transferred from the accumulating conveyer 28 to the edge combing mechanism 36 which is operative to remove the folded edges. Thereafter the two-ply web is passed between drawing mechanism" indicated generally at 66 arrangedto stretch the two-ply web a predetermined amount as" it is continuously advanced therebetween in order to increase the" angular relationship between the fibers in adjacent plies of the web so as to measure more than 90' at said apices, preferably about for example, such stretching being performed to accommodate a subsequent drawing operation in a direction atri'ght angles to the movement of the two-ply web through the drawing mechanism 136 to bring the angular relationship of the fibers back to substantially 90 or at right angles to each other.

As illustrated in Figs. 1 and 3, the drawing mechanism is disposed immediately beyond the edge combing mechanism and comprises a first pair of upper and lower'rolls 6 8, 70 arranged to be rotated'at a surface speed substantially corresponding to the linear speed of the accumulatingconveyen'and a second pair of upper and lower rolls 72, 74 spaced a short distance from the first pair of rolls and arranged to be rotated at a relatively faster surface speed so as to eifect the drawing operation as the web passes between the two pairs of rolls. As indicated generally in Fig. l, in. the driving mechanism for driving the various associated elements provision is madefor driving the lower rolls of each pair of rolls 68, 70 and 72, 74 at different speeds and also for adjusting the driving'mechanism to vary the speeds whereby more or less drawing tension may be applied to the web as it passes between the two pairs of rolls. As herein shown, a main driving, housing 76 includes an electric motor 78 and gear reducing mechanism having an output shaft 80 connected by a chain and sprocket drive 82 to a variable drive mechanism of. any usual or prefer-red type indicated. at 86. As herein shown, the output shaft 84 ofv the variable speed mechanism is connected by a chain and sprocket drive 98 to a shaft 18.3 on which the lower roller"70 of the first pair of drawing rollers is mounted so as to drive suchfirst pair of drawing rolls at a surface speed corresponding to. the advance of the web from the accumulating conveyer and the. combingmechanism. 'It will be seen that the adjustment of the variable speed. drive to vary the speed of the shaft 84 will vary the The upper and lower rolls 68', 70 may rotate in opposite directions by frictional; engagement of the upper roll with the lower, the upper .roll being supported so that the weight of d the same will be against the lower roll. The second output shaft 194 of the variable drive mechanism may be connected by a chain and sprocket drive 106 to the shaft 108 on which the lower roll 74 of the second pair of drawing rolls is mounted so as to drive the second pair of rolls at a relatively faster surface speed to effect the drawing operation and which may be adjustably varied to effect more or less drawing action as required. The upper and lower drawing rolls 72, 74 may also rotate in opposite directions by frictional engagement of the upper roll with the lower.

As above described, the drawing operation is preferably arranged to stretch the web longitudinally a predetermined and accurately controlled amount so as to increase the angular relationship of the fibers of adjacent webs of the two-ply web from about 76 to about 110 as measured at the apices of the triangular patterns formed by the lapping operation. The web is then transferred to a receiving conveyer or runout apron 112 of a second lapping machine indicated generally at 114 which may also be of any usual or preferred construction and which includes upper and lower traversing aprons 116, 118 as, shown in Fig. 3, arranged to deposit the two-ply web between guide rolls 120, 122 onto a second accumulating apron or conveyer 124 travelling at right angles to the direction of advance of the two-ply web being deposited thereon. The lapping machine 114 is also preferably driven through connections from the second output shaft 104 of the variable drive mechanism which may include chain and sprocket drives 126, 128 to the runout conveyer 112 and a belt drive 130 to the transversing gear box 132 so that in operation adjustment of the variable drive to change the speed of the second pair of rolls 72, 74 will vary the speed of the associated lapping machine elements correspondingly to accommodate the increased length of the drawn web during its continuous advance.

For continuous operation the accumulating conveyer 124 is arranged to travel at a relatively slow rate of speed with relation to the rate of deposit of the two-ply web thereon so as to build up a multi-ply batt or web of substantial thickness with the transverse edges of successive laps relatively close together as indicated at 134 in Fig. 1. As illustrated in Figs. 1 and 4, the multi-ply batt 134 is then passed through conventional compressing and drawing rolls, indicated at 136, which may be driven through variable drive mechanism, indicated generally at 138, to efiect compressing of the batt and longitudinal stretching thereof in a direction such as to dispose the fibers of each of the several plies at right angles to each other as indicated at 140. As a result of such right angle disposition of the fibers of the web the tensile strength of the web is rendered substantially equal in all directions. As above described, and as illustrated in Fig. l, the two-ply web being deposited on the conveyer 124 is made up of triangular patterns wherein the fibers in adjacent plies are arranged at 110 relative to each other as measured at the apices of the triangular patterns. It will be observed that the multi-ply web or batt 134 is made up of closely lapped increments of the two-ply web having their various adjacent plies arranged at 110 at the apices of the triangles, or with the fibers of adjacent plies crossing each other at complementary angles of 70. Thus, as the multi-ply batt is continuously advanced at right angles to the direction of advance of the two-ply web and passed through the drawing rollers indicated at 136 in Fig. 4, the triangular patterns will be elongated longitudinally of the multi-ply batt to change the angles at the apices thereof from 110 to 90, thus decreasing the angularity of the fibers relative to each other. The conventional drawing and compress ing unit 136 driven through the variable'drive mechanism 138 is capable of adjustment to vary such elongation to eiiect more or less drawing action as required.

The compressed web is then transferred to a slatted feed apron or conveyer 142 which delivers the multi-ply web to a first needle punching mechanism of conventional form, as indicated at 144, to perform a needle punching operation through one side of the web. The continuously advanced web is then guided downwardly under idler rolls 146, 148 and then upwardly and through a second needle punching mechanism, indicated at 150, wherein a second needle punching operation is performed through the opposite side of the web. The construction and mode of operation of the above-mentioned needle punching are well known, and detailed description thereof is deemed unnecessary. The completed felt-like fibrous web is then guided upwardly and over idler pulleys 152, 156 and then downwardly to a windup device indicated at 158. The needle punching mechanisms 144 and may be driven through individual driving units indicated generally at 160 and 162 respectively, each driving unit including an electric motor 164 belted to a variable speed mechanism 166 of any usual or preferred form and which in turn is connected by a belt 168 to its respective needle punching mechanism. Thus, the speed of each needle punching mechanism may be varied to accommodate the feed of the web from the lapping machine 114.

. In the operation of the illustrated apparatus the: relative speeds of the lapping machine 114 and the accumulating conveyer 124 are such as to provide a thickness of about nine layers of the two-ply web in lapped relation, thus forming a completed web ofeighteen plies in thickness. It will be observed that the slightlydiagonal transverse edges 134 of successive laps of the web being built up on the relatively slowly moving accumulatingconveyer 124 comprise the combed edges of the two; ply web, and in accordance with one .featureof the invention such combed edges when passed through the compressing rolls 136 become more uniformly compressed and blended with adjacent portions of the web to produce a unitary felt-like web of substantially uniform thickness and density and with a substantially uniform distribution of fibers. If such folded edges were not removed, the transverse edges would form distinct lines in the multi-ply web. Furthermore, if such edges were trimmed in the conventional manner, such as by shearing, the fibers of the two-ply web along the marginal shear line are squeezed togetherQand during subsequent lapping to build up the multi-ply web, such shear lines would also cause uneven distribution of the fibers resulting in slight but nevertheless visible transverse lines in the completed felt-like web. Formation of these objectionable lines are avoided by the present combing operation. It will also be apparent that the controls for the speeds of the various associated elements may be adjusted to produce other angular dispositions of the fibers in the completed web whereby the tensile strength in one direction may be greater than that in a direction at right angles thereto if desired.

From the above description it will be seen that the present novel method and apparatus is adapted to produce a superior felt-like fibrous material of substantially uniform thickness and density and which is further char-- acterized by a balanced and controlled orientation of the fibers so that the completed product'may have equal or different tensile strength in different directions.

While the invention has been described in connection with the production of a needle felt it will be understood that other felt-like materials may be produced, including fibrous materials which have been felted or needled or pressed.

While the preferred embodiment of the invention has been herein illustrated and described, .it will beunder-w stood that the invention may be embodied in otherforms within the scope of the following claims.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed is: 1. In a continuous method of producing a felt-like fibrous material, the steps comprising: advancing. av

single continuous length of a thin fibrous web having.

a majority of its component fibers extending longitudinally thereof and in substantially parallel relation,

then subjecting the web to a firstlapping operation by,

' angular portion of the previously deposited lap forming a-two ply web in a series of triangular patterns, regulating the rate of conveyor movement with relation to the speed ,with which the. increment lengths are deposited sons to maintain the trailing diagonal edge of one lapsubstantially coinciding, with the leading edge extending in the same diagonal direction of a previously deposited lap, and then subjecting the two-ply web to a second lapping operation at right angles to the first lapping operation forming a relatively thick web having relatively closely spaced laps, the webs being continuously moved during the entiremethod, compressing the relatively thick web and: elongating the same to change the angularity of the fibers in adjacent plies, and then subjecting the relatively thick web to a needle punching operation to maintain thev angular relationship of the plies.

'2. In: a'continuous method of producingv a felt-like fibrous. material, the steps comprising: advancing a single continuous length. ofv a thin fibrous web having a majorityv of its component fibers extending longitudinally there of and in substantially parallel relation, then subjecting the web to a first lapping operation by depositing successive increment lengths of the single continuous web on. an accumulating; conveyer moving. in adirection at right angles to the advance of the thin fibrous web and moving. the successively deposited increments on .said accumulating conveyer to form. a series of laps with. the trailing and leading edges of successive laps extending in opposite diagonal directions and with a triangular portion of a succeeding lap overlying a triangular portion ofthe previously deposited lap forming a two-ply web in a series of triangular patterns, regulating the rate of: conveyer movement with relation to the speed which the increment lengths are deposited so as to main tain. the trailing: diagonal edge of onev lap substantially coinciding: with the leading edge extending in the same diagonal direction of a previously deposited lap, elongating the two-ply 'web. after the first lapping operation to change the relative angularity' of the fibers in. adjacent plies,xthen subjecting: the two-ply web toa second.

lapping operation at right angles to the first lapping operation forming a relatively thick web having, relatively, closely spaced laps, and then elongating the relatively thick .web after thesecond lapping operation to again change the angularity between the fibers of. adjacent plies in a direction at right angles to said first elongation, the webs beingic'ontin'uouslymovecl during the entire method.

3. In acontinuous method of producing a felt-like lib-- rous. material, the steps comprising: advancing a single continuouslength ofa thin fibrous web having a majority of its component fibers extending longitudinally thereof and insuhstantially parallel relation, then subjecting the webm a first lapping operation by depositing successive increment'lengthsof the angle continuous web on an. ac-

cumulating conveyer moving in a direction at right angles to the: advance of: the thin fibrous web and moving; the

' successively deposited increments on said accumulating.

conveyer to form a series of: laps with thetrailing and leading edges of successive laps extendingin opposite diagonal directions and with. a triangular. portion of asuc-' ceeding lap overlying a triangular portion of the pre-. vion'sly deposited. lap forming a two-ply webin 3.,S8l'lES of triangular patterns, regulating the rate: of conveyor u movementwith relation to e speed with which the increment lengths are deposited so as to maintain the trailing: diagonal edge of one lap substantially coinciding with the leading edge extending in the same diagonal direction of a previously deposited lap, the relative movement during the first lapping operation being regulated so that the fibers of one ply extend at an angle of slightly less than with relation to the fibers of the second ply as, measured at the apex of one of the triangularflpatterns, elongating thetwoply web to increase the angularity or the fibers in the first and second plies of the two-ply web to slightly more than said 90", then subject-ingthe two-ply web to a second lapping operation at right angles to the first lapping operation forming a relatively thick web having relatively closely spaced laps, and then elongating the relatively thick web in a direction at right angles to said first elongation to decrease such angularity to about 90, the webs being continuously moved during the entire method. 7

4. The method as defined in claim 3 wherein the relavely thick web after the second lapping operation and elongation is compressed and subjected to a needle punching operation to maintain the angular disposition of the fibers as produced by said second elongation.

S. The method as defined in claim 3 wherein the movements of the two-ply web and of the relatively thick web,

are continuous with the movement of the thick web at a slow rate relative to the'movement of the two-ply web.

6. Apparatus for producingra felt-like fibrous material comprising, in combination, means for forming and advancing a veil-like web of carded fibrous material having the fibers. thereof arranged substantially parallel and extendedv in. the direction of advance, a lapper having an accumulating conveyer arranged at right angles to the lapper and driven at a relatively fast rate to cause successive laps'ofthe web to be deposited in opposed diagonal directions to form a two-ply web in triangular patterns with the fibers in one ply arranged diagonally with relation to the fibers in its adjacent ply, means for combing the marginal edges of. the two-ply web to remove the folded edge portions, means for drawing the web to change the angular relationship of the fibers of adjacent plies, a

second lapper having a receiving apron arranged to travel at an increased speedto accommodate the increased length of the drawn web, and having an: accumulating apron at right angles to the second lapper travelling at a relatively slow rate to cause successive laps of the web to build. up a .multi-ply web of. substantial thickness, and compressing and drawing rolls through which the multiply web is passed to again change the angular relationship of the-fibers in adjacent plies.

7. Apparatus as defined in claim 6 wherein provision is made for needling the web to produce a felt-like fibrous materialof. substantially uniform thickness and density, said provision for needling the web including a plurality of closely spaced needles reciprocated through the web to force some of the fibers vertically into the body of the multi-ply web to lock the fibers together and to maintain the remaining fi'bers'in the angular relationship effected by the second drawing operation. I

8. Apparatus as definedv in claim 6 wherein said first lapper is arranged to dispose the laps in a manner such that. the initial diagonal relationship of the fibers of successive laps is slightly less thau90" as measured at the apices. of said triangular patterns; wherein the first drawing means is constructed and arranged to effect arrangement of the fibers in adjacent plies at an angle of slightly morev than:9( as measuredv at said spices; and wherein the compressing and drawing rolls are constructed and arranged to 'eiiect arrangement of the fibers of adjacent webs substantiallyat right angles to each other whereby to produce a felt-like fibrous material having substantially equal tensile strength in all directions. I

9. Apparatus as defined in claim 6 wherein the combing means includes a roller arranged to support the web 9 with the folded edges extended beyond the ends of the roller, a pair of hold down rolls cooperating with the ends of the supporting roller, and a vibratory comb on each side of the web arranged to remove the folded edge portions as the web passes between said rolls.

10. Apparatus as defined in claim 9 wherein the first drawing means comprises two pairs of driven feed rolls arranged in slightly spaced relation, one pair of feed rolls being rotated to provide a surface speed corresponding to the linear speed of the first accumulating conveyer, the second pair of rolls being rotated to provide a relatively faster surface speed to efiect the drawing operation.

11. Apparatus as defined in claim 9 which includes variable driving means operatively connected to drive the accumulating conveyer and the first pair of rolls at one speed, and to drive the second pair of rolls and the receiving conveyer of the second lapper at a faster rate of speed.

12. Apparatus as defined in claim 6 which includes means for selectively varying the drawing operations to produce a final web having a predetermined tensile strength in any direction.

13. Apparatus for producing a felt-like fibrous ma terial comprising, in combination, means for forming and advancing a veil-like web of carded fibrous material having the fibers thereof arranged substantially parallel and extended in the direction of advance, a lapper having an accumulating conveyer arranged at right angles to the lapper and driven at a relatively fast rate to cause successive laps of the Web to be deposited in opposed diagonal directions to form a two-ply web in triangular patterns with the fibers in one ply arranged diagonally with relation to the fibers in its adjacent ply, means for combing the marginal edges of the two-ply web to remove the folded edge portions, means for drawing the Web to change the angular relationship of the fibers of adjacent plies, a second lapper having a receiving apron arranged to travel at an increased speed to accommodate the increased length of the drawn web, and having an accumulating apron at right angles to the second lapper travelling at a relatively slow rate to cause successive laps of the web to build up a multi-ply Web of substantial thickness.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,108,354 Fowler Aug. 25, 1914 2,381,184 Ripley Aug. 7, 1945 2,565,647 Brown et al Aug. 28, 1951 2,566,922 Brown et al Sept. 4, 1951 2,710,992 Goldman June 21, 1955 FOREIGN PATENTS 26,637 Great Britain of 1898 259,957 Great Britain Oct. 20, 1927

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Classifications
U.S. Classification19/163, 28/111, 28/112
International ClassificationD01G25/00, D04H1/70, D04H1/74
Cooperative ClassificationD04H1/74, D01G25/00
European ClassificationD04H1/74, D01G25/00