Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2927584 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 8, 1960
Filing dateApr 16, 1958
Priority dateApr 16, 1958
Publication numberUS 2927584 A, US 2927584A, US-A-2927584, US2927584 A, US2927584A
InventorsFrederick J Wallace
Original AssigneeAmerican Cystoscope Makers Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means for anchoring a surgical device and a surgical drain embodying the same
US 2927584 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 8, 1960 F. J. WALLACE 2,927,584

MEANS FOR ANCHORING A SURGICAL DEVICE AND A SURGICAL DRAIN EMBODYING THE SAME Filed April 16. 1958 V MI -:1

United States atent MEANS FOR ANCHORING A SURGICAL DEVICE zskND A SURGICAL DRAIN EMBODYING THE AME Frederick J. Wallace, New York, N.Y., assignor to American Cystoscope Makers, Inc., Pelham Manor, N.Y., a t corporation of New York Application April 16, 1958, Serial No. 728,836 Claims. or. 128-349) This invention relates to surgical drains and more particularly to catheters provided with an inflatable bag.

Hemostatic catheters have hitherto been formedwith an inflatable bag usually around the forward portion of the elongated tube which, in their inflated condition, are intended to anchor the catheter and bear against bleeding areas. Such devices are inserted into the body passageway with the bag deflated. After the unit has been properly positioned, the bag is inflated so that it engages the bleeding tissue. It has been found, however, that such bag catheters leave much to be desired in use because of a tendency to slip away from the bleeding area. I have found that failure of the inflated bag to provide the desired anchoring effect is due primarily to the presence of body fluids such as blood in the region where the bag is supposed to eifect hemostasis and that such fluids permit the catheter to slip even with the bag inflated and in spite of the fact that such devices are commonly made of such materials as rubber, nylon, polyethelene or the like.

It is, therefore, a principal object of this invention to provide an improved inflatable hemostatic bag catheter which may be readily inserted and secured in place Within the body opening and which, with its bag inflated, is anchored against accidental dislodgement to a degree not hitherto attainable.

' Further objects as well as advantages of the present invention will be set forth in the following description of a preferred embodiment and the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 is an elevational view partially in section of a catheter constructed in accordance with the present invention;

Figure 2 is a fragmentary elevational view of the forward end thereof showing the bag inflated;

Figure 3 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view of the forward end portion of the catheter;

Figures 4 and 5 are respectively cross-sectional views through the line 4-4 of Figure 1 and the line 5-5 of Figure 3; and

Figure 6 is a diagrammatic view showing the apparatus suitable for flocking the bag portion of the catheter.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, catheter 10 comprises an elongated tube 11 having a rounded forward end 12 adjacent to which several openings 13 are formed which communicate with the interior, longitudinal bore 14 of the catheter. The rearward end portion 15 of the catheter 10 may be of enlarged diameter to facilitate the attachment of suitable devices for collecting the fluids which drain through the catheter.

Tube 11 is formed with a second passageway 16 extending longitudinally along the wall thereof from just rearward of the rearmost opening 13 to adjacent to rearward end 15 where tube 11 branches and is provided with an inflating tube 17. As shown most clearly in Figure 5, passageway 16 opens at 18 into bag 19 formed by an annular band secured in an airtight manner along its edges to the external surface of tube 11. Bag 19 is readily inflated, as shown in Figures 2 and 3, when a suitable pumping device such as a syringe is connected to the open end of inflating tube 17.

The manner in which catheter 10 as thus far described is made is well known to those skilled in the art and does not require elaboration here. When formed of deposited rubber latex the catheter is given one or more finishing dips into a latex bath after the member forming bag 19 has been aflixed thereto. Immediately after the final dip and while the external surface of bag 19 is tacky. The catheter is positioned in chamber 20 (Figure 6) above a supply of flocking material 21 in position upon a Van De Graaif generator. The surface portions of catheter 10 upon which it is not desired that the flocking adhere is coated with a suitable masking compound or plastic tape. As shown in Figure 6, bag 19 is maintained inflated during the deposition thereon of the flocking material.

Flocking material 21 may be of any suitable fiber such as cotton flock, wool fiber, or rayon acetate, nylon, Dacron or similar synthetic fiber. The fibers may vary in length from about .001 to .080 inch. Due to the electrostatic charge imparted by the Van De Graaff generator the fibers travel through the space in the chamber 20 oriented so that they reach the catheter 10 with one end leading and their longitudinal axis substantially normal to the surface of the catheter. The catheter may be rotated to insure complete deposition over the entire surface of bag 19. When the catheter has been in chamber 20 sufliciently long for bag 19 to be completely flocked the catheter is removed and the masking material is removed therefrom.

The flocking of the bag portion of the catheter may also be carried out after the catheter has completely set. In that event only the bag 19 which is to receive the flocking material is painted with a solution of natural rubber so as to provide it with a tacky surface which when set will unite integrally with the underlying material. As thus treated, the catheter is then suspended in chamber 20 and the flock adheres to the tacky surface.

While it has been found that best results are achieved when bag 19 is flocked in the presence of an electrostatic charge, it is possible to eflect deposition of the flocking material upon the bag portion of the catheter in the absence of an electrostatic charge.

Catheter 10 is particularly useful where a hemostatic bag catheter is desired to effect hemostasis in areas where tissue has been surgically removed. For example, in prostate removal a certain amount of bleeding occurs and after removal of the gland it is the function of a hemostatic bag catheter, inserted via the urethra and inflated with water or other suitable medium, to

compress venisoles or small arteries and thereby reduce bleeding.

When catheter 10 is introduced into the urethra and the bag inflated the flocked surface of bag 19 prevents the inflated bag from slipping away from the wet, bleeding area.

The terms and expressions which have been employed are used as terms of description and not of limitation, and there is no intention, in the use of such terms and expressions, of excluding any equivalents of the features shown and described or portions thereof, but it is recognized that various modifications are possible within the scope of the invention claimed.

What is claimed is:

1. A surgical drain, comprising an elongated tube said tube and for effecting hemostasis including a resil- 2. An inflatable, hemostatic bag catheter, comprising an elongated tube having'at least one opening formed therein adjacent to the forward end thereof to permit drainage of body fluid into the bore of said'tube, a resilient wall member secured to and engirdling a portion of said tube and forming an inflatable bag, an inflating tube joined to said first mentioned tube. adjacent to the rearward end thereof, said first mentioned tube having a second bore formed therein affording cornniunication between said inflating tube and said bag, and flock aflixed to the external surface of said bag and forming a mat-like surface.

3. Means for anchoring a surgical device within the body of a patient, comprising a resilient impervious member secured to and engirdling a portion of said device adapted to be introduced into a body passage and forming an inflatable bag, means for inflating said bag, and said bag having a mat-like exterior surface positioned for directly engaging in non-slip relation the wall of said passage.

4. Means for anchoring a surgical device within the 1 2 258 i v i a (A body of a patient, comprising a resilient impervious member secured to and engirdling a portion of said device adapted to be introduced into a body opening and forming an inflatable bag, means for inflating said bag, and flock aflixed to the external surface of said bag and providing the same 'with a mat-like exterior surface.

5. An inflatable, hernostatic bag catheter, comprising an elongated tube having at least one opening formed therein adjacent to the forward end thereof to permit drainage of body fluid into the bore of said tube, a resilient sleeve engirdling a portion of said tube and secured thereto in an airtight manner to form an inflatable bag, an inflating tube joined to said first mentioned tube adjacent to the rearward end thereof, said first mentioned tube having a second bore formed therein affording communication between said inflating tube and said bag, and flock in the form of discrete fibers aflixed to substantially the entire external surface of said, bag, said fibers being each connected to the surface of said bag so as to have one end thereof free.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2610626 *Jul 27, 1951Sep 16, 1952Edwards John DSyringe
US2847997 *Jan 13, 1956Aug 19, 1958James J TiboneCatheter
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3903893 *Oct 16, 1973Sep 9, 1975Alexander L ScheerNasal hemostatic device
US4979947 *Oct 10, 1985Dec 25, 1990Berman Irwin REncapsulated expandible continence device
US5135474 *Aug 3, 1990Aug 4, 1992University Of Medicine And Dentistry Of New JerseyHepatic bypass catheter
US5146925 *Nov 21, 1990Sep 15, 1992Lamar SnowCholangiocatheter and delivery system
US5197948 *Jan 3, 1991Mar 30, 1993Kamran GhodsianIntra-abdominal organ manipulator, irrigator and aspirator
US5308327 *Nov 25, 1991May 3, 1994Advanced Surgical Inc.Self-deployed inflatable retractor
US5337754 *Sep 1, 1993Aug 16, 1994Advanced Surgical, Inc.Inflatable isolation bag
US5423745 *Jul 6, 1994Jun 13, 1995Research Medical, Inc.Irregular surface balloon catheters for body passageways and methods of use
US5487730 *May 27, 1994Jan 30, 1996Medtronic, Inc.Balloon catheter with balloon surface retention means
US5524633 *Oct 1, 1993Jun 11, 1996Advanced Surgical, Inc.Self-deploying isolation bag
US5620418 *Dec 7, 1994Apr 15, 1997Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyRetrograde coronary sinus catheter
US5653690 *Oct 30, 1995Aug 5, 1997Medtronic, Inc.Catheter having a balloon with retention enhancement
US5693014 *May 15, 1995Dec 2, 1997Boston Scientific CorporationBalloon catheter
US5720726 *Sep 20, 1996Feb 24, 1998Medtronic, Inc.Balloon catheter having retention enhancements on the balloon
US5746745 *Mar 1, 1996May 5, 1998Boston Scientific CorporationBalloon catheter
US5807326 *Mar 6, 1995Sep 15, 1998Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyRetrograde coronary sinus catheter
US6306144Nov 1, 1996Oct 23, 2001Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Selective coating of a balloon catheter with lubricious material for stent deployment
US6458138Oct 4, 2001Oct 1, 2002Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Selective coating of a balloon catheter with lubricious material for stent deployment
US6695809 *Sep 13, 1999Feb 24, 2004Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Catheter balloon with a discontinuous elastomeric outer layer
US6736841Jul 31, 2002May 18, 2004Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Textured and/or marked balloon for stent delivery
US6776775Apr 29, 2002Aug 17, 2004Owais MohammadHypodermic syringe needle assembly and method of making the same
US6786889 *Mar 31, 1999Sep 7, 2004Scimed Life Systems, IncTextured and/or marked balloon for stent delivery
US6890348Oct 1, 2002May 10, 2005Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Selective coating of a balloon catheter with lubricious material for stent deployment
US7476214Sep 27, 2004Jan 13, 2009Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Selective coating of a balloon catheter with lubricious material for stent deployment
US7950393Sep 29, 2006May 31, 2011Nellcor Puritan Bennett LlcEndotracheal cuff and technique for using the same
US8196584Jun 22, 2006Jun 12, 2012Nellcor Puritan Bennett LlcEndotracheal cuff and technique for using the same
US8206781 *Nov 12, 2010Jun 26, 2012Vincent DicristofaroMethod of manufacturing a balloon
US8307830Sep 29, 2006Nov 13, 2012Nellcor Puritan Bennett LlcEndotracheal cuff and technique for using the same
US8360000 *Nov 27, 2006Jan 29, 2013Japan Science And Technology AgencyFlocked medical instrument to be placed in the body, method of producing the medical instrument to be placed in the body and apparatus for producing the medical instrument to be placed in the body
US8413659Aug 3, 2010Apr 9, 2013Covidien LpSelf-sizing adjustable endotracheal tube
US8434487Jun 22, 2006May 7, 2013Covidien LpEndotracheal cuff and technique for using the same
US8561614Sep 28, 2006Oct 22, 2013Covidien LpMulti-layer cuffs for medical devices
US8590534Jun 22, 2009Nov 26, 2013Covidien LpCuff for use with medical tubing and method and apparatus for making the same
US8636010Sep 12, 2012Jan 28, 2014Covidien LpEndotracheal cuff and technique for using the same
US8684175Sep 22, 2006Apr 1, 2014Covidien LpMethod for shipping and protecting an endotracheal tube with an inflated cuff
US8750978Dec 18, 2008Jun 10, 2014Covidien LpSystem and sensor for early detection of shock or perfusion failure and technique for using the same
US8807136Aug 20, 2010Aug 19, 2014Covidien LpSelf-sizing adjustable endotracheal tube
US20090306599 *Nov 27, 2006Dec 10, 2009Japan Science And Technology AgencyFlocked medical instrument to be placed in the body, method of producing the medical instrument to be placed in the body and apparatus for producing the medical instrument to be placed in the body
CN101879345BNov 27, 2006Jul 4, 2012独立行政法人科学技术振兴机构Apparatus for producing the percutaneous terminal
DE102012214640A1 *Aug 17, 2012Feb 20, 2014Aesculap AgBeflockter medizinischer Schlauch
EP0204218A1 *May 22, 1986Dec 10, 1986Stöckert Instrumente GmbHBalloon catheter
EP0746362A1 *Aug 23, 1994Dec 11, 1996Boston Scientific CorporationImproved balloon catheter
EP0774987A1May 27, 1994May 28, 1997SciMed Life Systems, Inc.Selective arrangement of lubricous coatings on balloon catheters
EP1955726A1 *Nov 27, 2006Aug 13, 2008Japan Science and Technology AgencyFrocked medical instrument to be placed in the body, method of producing the medical instrument to be placed in the body and apparatus for producing the medical instrument to be placed in the body
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/103.8
International ClassificationA61M25/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M25/1036, A61M27/00, A61M2025/1086, A61M25/04
European ClassificationA61M25/10G3, A61M25/04