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Publication numberUS2928404 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 15, 1960
Filing dateAug 13, 1958
Priority dateAug 13, 1958
Publication numberUS 2928404 A, US 2928404A, US-A-2928404, US2928404 A, US2928404A
InventorsKlages John W
Original AssigneeColumbus Auto Parts
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Collapsible shelter
US 2928404 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 15, 1960 w. KLAGEs 2,928,404

COLLAPSIBLE SHELTER Filed Aug. 15, 1958 3 Sheets-Sheet l v 21 Zlxl FIG. 2 L

IN VEN TOR.

JQHN W. KLAGES WM Mam ATTORNEYS March 15, 1960 J. w. KLAGES COLLAPSIBLE SHELTER 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 15, 1958 INVENTOR.

JOHN W. KLAGES March 15, 1960 J. w. KLAGES COLLAPSIBLE SHELTER 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Aug. 15, 1958 IN V EN TOR. JOHN W. KLAGES ATTORNEYS COLLAPSIBLE SHELTER John W. Klages, Columbus, Ohio, assignor to The Columbus Auto Parts Company, Columbus, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Application August 13, 1958, Serial No. 754,806

1 Claim. (Cl. 135-4) This invention relates generally to a novel shelter for use by sportsmen and particularly to a collapsible shelter that can be compactly packaged for ease of transportation.

In general the present invention relates to a shelter structure which includes a roof frame consisting of a plurality of tubular members extended radially outwardly from a hub. The inner ends of the roof members are attached to the hub whereby the roof members can be folded in compact co-extensive relationship with each other. The shelter of the present invention further includes a sidewall frame formed by a plurality of upright tubular members each of which consists of a plurality of telescope segments of substantially the same length as the previously mentioned tubular roof frame members. The upper segment of each sidewall member is pivotally connected to a respective roof frame member and is of substantially the same length whereby the upper segments of the sidewall members can be folded into compact co-extensive disposition with the roof frame members.

As another aspect of the present invention, the outer ends of the rad.ally outwardly extending roofframememtrite tates Patent bers are connected to the hub of the roof frame by a plurality of quickly detaching radially outwardly 'extending flexible tension members. These tension members cooperate with the tubular roof frame members and hub to form a rigid truss construction.

As still another a'pect of the present invention, a quickly detachable multiple segment covering is provided for the above de'cribed frame structure to afford protection to the occupants from inclement weather and the like.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following description description, reference being bad to the accompanying drawings wherein a preferred form of embodiment of the invention is clearly shown.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a front perspective view of ashelter constructed according to the present invention;

Figure 2 is a side elevational view, partly in section, illustrating the framework of the shelter of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a second side elevational view, partially in section, showing the framework-of-the shelter of Figure 2 in a partially folded configuration;

Figure 4 is a third side elevational view, partially in section, showing the frame structure ina morecompletely folded configuration;

Figure 5 is a partial top view of a hub structure comprising a portion of the roof frame of the shelter of the preceding figures; and

Figure 6 is a partial side view of the hub structure of Figure 5.

Referring in detail to the drawing, a shelter constructed according to the present invention is indicated generally at 20 in Figure l. The shelter includes a plurality of upright wall members 21 each of which comprises a plurality of segments 24 and 25 adjoined together at a ice telescoping junction 26. The frame further includes a plurality of roof members 28 which extend readily out-- formed of the same material as the roof covering.- Panel 33 includes a window 36 preferably formed from a transparent material such as cellophane or the like. It should be mentioned that a screen made of plastic, fiber glass, or the like, can be readily substituted in place of window 36 or the transparent material forming window 36 can be discarded entirely, as the case may be, without departing from the spirit of the instant invention.

Panels 33 and 34 are 'detachably connected to upright wall members 21 by a plurality of snap fasteners 35 such panels when so connected being arranged in overlapping relationship at the junctions thereof as indicated at 37. Each of the panels can be partially connected as shown in Figure 1 wherein lower portion 40 of panel 34 is connected to members 21 by the lowermost fasteners 35. It should be understood that snap fasteners 35 are attached to upright wall members 21 and are adapted to receive and retain the wall panels inthe manner as described.

.An access to shelter 20 is shown in Figure '1 by the rand-ch removal of a'panel, it being understood that such access is also possible by disconnecting, as desired, any of the several combinations of snap fasteners 35 appropriately connecting the selected panel to upright wall members 21.

Hub Sitincludes a tubular element 42 and a fitting hereinafter referred to as a spider 45 into which an upper end portion of element 42 is inserted. Spider 45 is a composite ofa sleeve and a plurality of lugs '44 formed integrally thereof and extending tangentially therefrom. Preferably, spider 45 is an extrusionformed in two sections 46A and 46B and readily assembled in surrounding relationship with element 42 at the upper end portion thereof, and retained in this relationship by:a fastener 43, Figure 5.

It should be pointed out that section 46A and section 46B are identical such that the rotation of the configuration, for example, section 46A through 180 of are, about the center of element 42 as shown in Figure 5, will result in the rotated configuration accurately defining the precise configuration of section 46B, similarly shown in V Figure 5.

Each of the sections 46A and 463 includes a curved surface 51, the extension of two or more lines normal to surface 51 and from any point on surface 51 will intersect at a common point which point is also the eter .of an-opening defined by curved surface 51 of sections 46A and 46B, when disposed as shown in Figure 5,

.is slightly larger than the outside diameter of tubular element 42. j

With further reference to Figure 5, each of the sections 46A and 46B is provided With an opening 47; similarly, an opening 48 is provided in the upper end portion of tubular element 42. Opening 47 is provided preferably at a fillet 49 which fillet is located between the lugs 44 nearest junction 50 of sections 46A and 46B.

Section 46A includes a lip 51A which overlaps an inner peripheral extension 52B on section 46B. Similarly, section 46B includes a lip 513 which overlaps an inner peripheral extension 52A of section 46A. Thus, a first junction 50 is formed by lip 51B and extension d j 52A and a second iunction 50 is formed by lip 51A and extension 523.

Opening 47 aligns with opening 48 to receive fastener 43 for the-purpose of mounting, spider 45 to tubularelement ,42. It should be understood thatthe placement of opening 47 and the projection of lips 51A and 51B and their associated extensions 52B and 52A respectively in the manner as previously described assures a strong connection of spider 45 to tubular element 42 and any possibility of sections 46A and 46B separating especially at the junctions 50 is minimized and virtually eliminated.

With continued reference to Figure 5, each of the lugs 44 is provided with an opening 53 to receive a fastener j 54 for pivotally connecting tubular roof member 28 to hub 30. An opening 55 is provided in each of the roof members 28 near the inner endthereof.

An opening 56 is provided atthe outer end of roof member 28 to receive a fastener 58 which extends through opening 56 and hence through opening 57 located at the upper endof segment 24 to pivotally connect each of the roof members 28 to a respective upright wall member 21. v

With reference to Figures 2 and 3, a typical brace 60 is provided at each of the junctions of upright wall members 21 and roof members 28 and adds rigidity to the structure when erected in the operational configuration of Figure 1. With continued reference to Figures 2 and 3, brace 60 includes an upper member 61 pivo ally connected to roof member 28 by a fastener 62. Similarly, lower member 64 is pivotal-y connected to segment 24 of upright wall member 21 by a fastener 65. Members 61 and 64 are hinged at 63 and are co-extensive of each other when shelter is erected. When segments 24 are disconnected from their respective segments 2'5 at telescoping junctions 26 and subsequently disposed inwardly toward the folded storage configuration of Figure 4, it is seen in Figure. 3 that upper member 61 and lower member 64 are moved downwardly about pivotal fasteners 62 and 65 respectively and about hinge 63.

With continued reference to Figures 2 and 3, a tension member 70 is detachably connected by a typical spring clip 69, Figure 6, to an eye bolt 71, or its equivalent, mounted on roof member 28 'at; the outer end thereof. Tension member 70 extendsthr ough openings 72 provided in the lower portion of tubular element 42 and is connected to a diametrically opposite roof member 28 in a similar manner. Preferably, each of the oppositely directed pairs of roof members is provided with a tension member 70 although a fewer. number of tension members may be utilized without departing from the spirit of the instant invention. Tension members 70 cooperate with tubular roof members 28 and hub 30 to form a truss structure. The pitch of this truss structure is determined by the length of tension members 70 which members are formed of a preferred length to achieve the desired pitch. Othersmay incorporate means to adjust the length of tension members 70, and hence to vary the pitch of roof member 28, without departing from the spirit of the instant invention.

With particular referenceto Figure 6, tubular element 42 is provide with holes 72 each of which is in vertical alignment with a respective roof member 28; It should be understood that each of the tension members 7 0 canbe detachably connected by a second clip 69 to a fastener,

not shown, mounted in holes 72 ofelement 42 whereas in the preferred structure tension members are not connected to element 42 but rather pass diametrically therethrough and are detachably connected at the outer end of roof member 28 as previously described. It is seen in Figure 6 that each of the lugs 44 is provided with a rounded upper edge to prevent damage to the flexible material which forms the roof covering of the instant invention. W

Shelter 20 is readily transportable when disposed in the storage configuration of Figure 4 wherein is shown the folded disposition of segments 24, roof members 28, hub 30, and tension members 70. Roof covering 32 and panels 33 and 34 are not shown in Figure 4 but it should 1 be understood that same can be readily folded compactly to facilitate transportation thereof.

When shelter 20 is to be erected, roof members 28 are disposed outwardly and segments 24 are subsequently moved downwardly whereupon brace 60. is extendedto its locking disposition as shown in Figure 2. Lower segment 25 is then connected .to upper segment 24 at telescoping junction 26; Thus the framework of shelter 20 has been erected.

Flexible roof covering 32 is placed over roof members 28 and secured thereto by tie strings, not shown, attached to cover 32 on the bottom surface thereof. Wall panels 33 and 34 are then detachably connected .to upright wall members 21 as desired.

While the form of embodiment of the present inventionas herein disclosed constitutes a preferred form, it

is to be understood that other forms might be adopted,

I claim: A collapsible shelter structure comprising, in combination, hub means including a plurality of peripheral portions, a post portion disposed between said peripheral portions and, extending downwardly therefrom, and means for clamping said hub portions together, said peripheral portions forming a plurality of arms, each of which extends outwardly laterally of and substantially parallel with a radial line through the center ofsaid hub means; a plurality of upright wall members each of which includes an upper end portion; a plurality, of roof-members extending radially outwardly and'downwardly from said hub, each of said roof members including an inner end having'a side extending along a side ofone of said arms in lap-joined relationship therewith, a free side, and a longitudinal axis extendingthrough thecenter of said hub, each of said roof members further including an outerend portion attached to an upper end-portion of one of said wall members at a junction; a plurality of flexible tension members extending radially'from said post and in force transmitting relationship with certain of said end portions; a brace connected between said.

outer end portions and said upper endportion at; said junction; and a flexible material secured to saidmembers and forming the roof and wall covering for said members. x 5 1 References Cited in the-file of this patent .UNITED'STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US1631215 *Jun 4, 1924Jun 7, 1927Us Tent & Awning CompanyTent
US2000205 *May 16, 1934May 7, 1935Cecil M WickstrumTent construction
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3042052 *Dec 8, 1959Jul 3, 1962Des Rosier James SPortable tepee
US3169543 *Jun 21, 1962Feb 16, 1965James B McgertyPortable shelter
US3499457 *Jul 31, 1967Mar 10, 1970Brohn David MalcolmTent
US4641676 *Jan 23, 1984Feb 10, 1987Lynch James PCollapsible canopy structure
US4779635 *Aug 26, 1987Oct 25, 1988Lynch James PCollapsible canopy with telescoping roof support structure
US5096214 *Apr 9, 1990Mar 17, 1992Lionel WalkerPortable enclosure
US5234011 *Aug 2, 1991Aug 10, 1993Lynch James PClear span tent structure
US5421356 *Sep 14, 1993Jun 6, 1995Lynch; James P.Collapsible canopy framework having captured scissor ends with non-compressive pivots
US5669403 *Apr 12, 1996Sep 23, 1997Belcher; Michael M.Hunting blind adapted to be mounted in a tree
US6240940Apr 21, 2000Jun 5, 2001Mark C. CarterCollapsible shelter with flexible, collapsible canopy
US6397872Oct 17, 2000Jun 4, 2002Mark C. CarterResilient support for erectable shelter roof
US6431193Apr 26, 2001Aug 13, 2002Mark C. CarterCollapsible shelter with flexible, collapsible canopy
US6748963Aug 7, 2002Jun 15, 2004Mark C. CarterCollapsible shelter with flexible, collapsible canopy
US6892744Mar 26, 2001May 17, 2005Thomas G. FeldpauschCollapsible shelter structure
US6920889Jun 10, 2004Jul 26, 2005Mark C. CarterCollapsible shelter with flexible, collapsible canopy
US7252108 *Jul 25, 2005Aug 7, 2007Carter Mark CCollapsible shelter with flexible, collapsible canopy
US7316237 *Apr 27, 2006Jan 8, 2008Solar Dynamics CorporationChildren's play area sunshade canopy
US7434591 *Jun 25, 2004Oct 14, 2008Church Godfrey BRain protection umbrella
US7530364Mar 6, 2008May 12, 2009Carter Mark CErectable canopy with reinforced roof structure
US7624747Oct 6, 2008Dec 1, 2009Carter Mark CErectable canopy with reinforced roof structure
US7640943Jun 28, 2007Jan 5, 2010Mark C CarterCollapsible shelter with flexible, collapsible canopy
US7735505May 11, 2009Jun 15, 2010Carter Mark CErectable canopy with reinforced roof structure
US7743781 *Feb 21, 2007Jun 29, 2010Jerry Micah SlaughterReconfigurable portable hunting blind
US7766022Dec 5, 2005Aug 3, 2010Eurio, Inc.Modular system for concealment and shelter
US7802582Apr 20, 2007Sep 28, 2010Evrio, Inc.System for concealment and shelter with structure for rapid setup and tight skin
US7828038Jan 28, 2005Nov 9, 2010Evrio, Inc.Universal lightweight portable concealment means and methods
US7841355Jul 10, 2006Nov 30, 2010Evrio, Inc.Modular system including shaft segments having configuration and breakdown attachments
US7845365Oct 13, 2009Dec 7, 2010Carter Mark CErectable canopy with reinforced roof structure
US7891369Dec 9, 2009Feb 22, 2011Carter Mark CCollapsible shelter with flexible, collapsible canopy
US8056572Oct 27, 2008Nov 15, 2011Evrio, Inc.System for rapid concealment and shelter including angular frames and warfighter covers
US8381454 *Apr 6, 2011Feb 26, 2013Markus R. RobinsonSegmented, elongated, expandable, 4-season, double-walled, low-cost, rigid extruded plastic panel structures
US8397738 *Jun 16, 2005Mar 19, 2013Evrio, Inc.Modular system for concealment and shelter
US8429858 *Jan 22, 2010Apr 30, 2013Markus F. RobinsonSemi-permanent, 4-season, modular, extruded plastic, flat panel, insulatable, portable, low-cost, rigid-walled structure
US20040144413 *Nov 12, 2003Jul 29, 2004Matthews John T.Collapsible canopy and framework therefor
US20040237423 *Jun 10, 2004Dec 2, 2004Carter Mark C.Collapsible shelter with flexible, collapsible canopy
US20050284037 *Jun 16, 2005Dec 29, 2005Merritt Ronald RKnockdown gazebo
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US20070028954 *Jul 25, 2005Feb 8, 2007Carter Mark CCollapsible shelter with flexible, collapsible canopy
US20070193612 *Feb 21, 2007Aug 23, 2007Jerry Micah SlaughterReconfigurable portable hunting blind
US20070251563 *Jun 28, 2007Nov 1, 2007Carter Mark CCollapsible shelter with flexible, collapsible canopy
US20080006317 *Apr 20, 2007Jan 10, 2008John LivacichSystem for concealment and shelter with structure for rapid setup and tight skin
US20080149157 *Mar 6, 2008Jun 26, 2008Carter Mark CErectable canopy with reinforced roof structure
US20090038666 *Oct 6, 2008Feb 12, 2009Carter Mark CErectable canopy with reinforced roof structure
US20090065039 *Oct 27, 2008Mar 12, 2009John LivacichSystem for rapid concealment and shelter including angular frames and warfighter covers
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Classifications
U.S. Classification135/98, 135/119, 135/117, 135/115, 135/147, 135/123
International ClassificationE04H15/34, E04H15/48, E04H15/32
Cooperative ClassificationE04H15/48, E04H15/322
European ClassificationE04H15/48, E04H15/32B