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Publication numberUS2929414 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 22, 1960
Filing dateAug 18, 1955
Priority dateAug 18, 1955
Publication numberUS 2929414 A, US 2929414A, US-A-2929414, US2929414 A, US2929414A
InventorsGustav O Lienhard
Original AssigneeChicopee Mfg Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paper containing fabric
US 2929414 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 22, 1960 G. o. LIENHARD 2,929,414

PAPER CONTAINING FABRIC Filed Aug. 18, 1955 -BY mim-ORNE! as. t

PAPER CONTAINING FABRIC Gustav 0. Lienhard, Metuchen, NJ., assiguor to Chico- Apparati@ August 1s, 195s, serial No. 529,191

Y 4 Claims. (Cl. 139-420) The present invention relates to woven fabrics suitable for upholstery, more particularly to such fabrics which are suitable for automobile and outdoor upholstery and automobile seat covers.

This invention contemplates a fabric woven from a mixture of saran filaments and paper yarns. By saran is meant a copolymer of vinylidene chloride and vinyl chloride or acrylonitrile wherein the vinyl chloride or acrylonitrile is present in a lesser amount, generally below 20 percent by weight of the copolymer. 'Ilhis type of material is sold for extrusion by the Dow Chemical Company. By the term filaments is meant monofilaments, multifilament strands, yarns spun from saran staple, etc. The paper yarns preferably are formed from paper strips twisted and reduced by running the strips through a reducer such as generally disclosed in Rice Patent No. 436,261. However, the paper strips may be merely crumpled and reduced rather than twisted in a regular fashion.

Paper fabrics for automobile upholstery and seat covers are well known, as are similar fabrics woven entirely of Saran. Generally speaking, paper upholstery fabrics are not competitive with similar saran fabrics. While the paper fabrics are much cheaper than the saran fabrics, they also are generally weaker and wear out much more quickly. Thus, they are in a different competitive class from Saran fabrics.

The present invention contemplates a modified paper fabric incorporating saran, which is much cheaper than Saran fabrics due to its paper content; yet is competitive with saran fabrics in the automobile field, for instance, due to the unusual amount of strength and wear resistance contributed by the Saran it contains. Other advantages of the fabric of this invention over a plain saran fabric lie in its increased resistance to damage due to cigarette burns or other damage by heat and its decreased tendency to generate static electricity due to sliding over the saran.

Apparently, a hot ash or the lighted end of a cigarette will melt a hole through an all saran seat cover, for example, very quickly; in fact, as many automobile owners know only too well, more quickly than the dropped cigarette can be recovered. In the fabric of this invention, the paper yarns which are relatively inert to heat, act both to shield the saran filaments from the direct action of heat and to insulate them, in a sense, from one another, thereby retarding the melting of individual filaments.

According to this invention, Saran filaments are interwoven with paper yarns to form a at fabric with the -saran in the warp and the paper in the fill or vice versa, yor Saran may be mixed with paper in both the warp and should range between 80 percent paper and 20 percent :satan and 33 percent paper and 67 percent saran.

Pref- Ice a 2,929,414

Patented Mar. 22, 1960 erably, the fabric is plain woven fairly tightly. However, similar weaves may be employed, and for certain uses such as summer-type seat covers, the resulting weave may be fairly loose to give maximum ventilation.

An illustrative embodiment of a fabric according to this invention is described hereinafter in connection with the drawings wherein:

Fig. 1 is an enlarged plan View of a typical fabric according to this invention, and

Fig. 2 is a still further enlarged sectional view along the line 2-2 of Fig. l, and

Fig. 3 is a similarly enlarged sectional view along the line 3--3 of Fig. 1, and

Fig. 4 is a greater enlargement of a portion of Fig. 2, and

Fig. 5 is a similar enlargement of a portion of Fig. 3.

Referring to the drawings, there is shown a plain woven fabric having somewhat flattened saran monofilaments 11 in the warp and similarly flattened twisted paper yarns 12 in the fill. This fabric is relatively tightly woven, comprising approximately 40 ends per inch of Saran and about.17 picks per inch of paper. With paper yarns formed from twisted strips of 16 1b. Wet strength paper approximately 14/32 inch wide and flat Saran monofilaments approximately 4500 yards per lb., the paper content is approximately 61 percent of the total with the remainder, 39 percent, saran. It will be seen that most of the coverage is provided by the attened paper yarns 12 which are quite close to one another, while the flattened filaments 11 lie closely over and protect the paper yarns 12 wherever the filaments cross the yarns on one side of the fabric.

While the fabric is relatively fiat and smooth, the paper yarns 12 are slightly crimped and the saran filaments are relatively highly crimped due mainly to the weaving operation and the fact that the yarns 12 are much bulkier than the filaments 11. The high spots 13 or tips of the crimped portions of the saran filaments 11 are exposed on both sides of the fabric whenever one of the filaments passes over one of the paper yarns 12. Since the saran filaments are relatively tough and dense as compared with the bulkier paper yarns, these high spots 13 tend to take most of the wear to which the fabric is subjected thereby minimizing failure due to abrasion of the paper yarns. It will be seen that high spots 13 or exposed portions of the Saran filaments 11 are spaced from one another on the face of the fabric and more or less surrounded by the adjacent portions of the intersecting paper yarns 12. Thus, the saran is partially imbedded in the paper and the exposed portions 13 of the filaments are insulated from one another, thereby minimizing heat damage to the saran and retarding the formation of holes due to contact with the lighted ends of cigarettes, etc. Due to the relatively small proportion of saran filaments exposed on the face of the fabric as opposed to the paper, the generation of static electricity due to sliding over the fabric, for example, also is minimized as mentioned hereinbefore.

Almost any type of paper may be employed in forming the fabric of this invention, although some type of socalled twisting tissue might best be used. Generally speaking, a wet-strength twisting tissue is preferred to minimize damage by water or other liquids. Wet-strength papers of this type conventionally are produced by mixing a wet-strength resin or a rubber or latex into the paper slurry before the paper actually is formed. v

Having now described the invention in specific detail and exemplified the manner in which it may be carried into practice, it will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art that innumerable variations, applications, modif fications, and extensions of the basic principles involved be nitide without departing from its spirit and scope. l

Ihus,.the kfabrics of the present invention may be employed in a host of ways that will be readily apparent to the kskilled artisan. We therefore intend to be limited only on accordance with the appended pate-rit claims.

1. A wearfresistant plain woven fabric comprising somewhat flattened paperl yarns in one direction ofthe fabric and similarly flattened relatively tough and dense sa'ran filaments inthe other direction ofthe fabric, vthe Saran filaments rising at the surface of the fabric where they pass over the paper yarns on at least one side of the fabric exposing portions of the saran filaments and forming wear-resistant high spotson this side of the fabric, the exposed portions of the Saran filamentsbeing spaced from one another and partially imbedded in 'the surrounding paper yarns and the paper yarns being relatively closely spaced from one `another, the composition of said fabric ranging between about 80 percent paper and `20 percent Saran and `33 percent paper and 67 percent saran.

2; A wear-resistant plain woven fabric comprising paper yarns in the filling direction of the fabric and relatively tough and dense Saran filaments in the Warp direction of the fabric, the saran filaments rising at Vthesurface of the fabric where they pass over the paper yarns on 'at least one side of the fabric exposing portions of the sara'n filaments and forming Wear-resistant high spots on this side of the fabric, the exposedportions of the saran filaments being spaced from one another and partially inr- 'bedded in the surrounding paper yarns and the paper yarns being relatively closely spaced from one another, the composition of said fabric ranging between about '80 percent. paper and ZO-percent seran and 33 percent .paper and 67 percent saran.

3. A wear-resistant woven fabric comprising Apapier yarns in one direction of the fabric and relatively ltough and dense s'aran filaments in the other direction of the fabric, the saran filaments rising at the surfaces of the fabric where they pass over the paper yarnsv exposing portions of the saran filaments and forming wear-resistant high spots, the exposed portions of the Saran filaments being spaced from one another and partially imbedded in the surrounding paper yarnsthe composition of said fabric ranging between about percent paper and 20 percent saran and 33 V'percent paper and 67 Apercent saran.

4. A wear-resistant woven fabric comprising paper yarns .and A'relatively tough and dense saran filaments intersecting one another, said Yyarns being bulkier than said filaments and said filaments being crimped to a greater extentrth'an said yarns, vthesaran filaments rising vat the surface of the fabric where they .pass over the paper yarns on at leastl vone side of the fabric exposing portions of the saran filaments and forming wear-resistant high spots on this side of the fabric, the exposed portions 'of tlresaran filaments 'being spaced from one another and partially imbedded in the surrounding 'paper yarns, the composition of said fabric ranging between about -80 percent paper and 2O percent saran and 33 vpercent'paper and -67 percent saran.

FOREIGN rATNTS 373,986 Great Britain 'Nov. 28, 1930

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1406208 *Mar 25, 1919Feb 14, 1922Seaman MillerOrnamental textile
US2312089 *Jun 13, 1942Feb 23, 1943Alfred A GobeilleFabric
US2539301 *Jul 15, 1949Jan 23, 1951Us Rubber CoWoven glass fabric and method of making same
US2590995 *Sep 10, 1948Apr 1, 1952Sackner Prod IncWoven fabric adapted for use as upholstery covers and the like
US2712834 *May 6, 1952Jul 12, 1955Chicopee Mills IncFire retardant fabric
US2741108 *Sep 20, 1951Apr 10, 1956Beaunit Mills IncFlame resistant fabric
US2812782 *Feb 10, 1955Nov 12, 1957Chicopee Mfg CorpMonofilament and fabric made thereby
GB373986A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3317366 *May 18, 1962May 2, 1967Beaunit CorpWoven polyester carpet backing and tufted carpet incorporating the same
US3451447 *Mar 29, 1967Jun 24, 1969Ferneyhough Henry HAuxiliary table and work holding means for power saws and the like
US6506697Aug 5, 1999Jan 14, 2003Merida Meridian, Inc.Tightly woven paper textile products
US7441394Jun 9, 2006Oct 28, 2008Casual Living Worldwide, Inc.Method of making furniture with synthetic woven material
US7448197Jun 14, 2006Nov 11, 2008Casual Living Worldwide, Inc.Method of making furniture with synthetic woven material
US7476630Apr 1, 2005Jan 13, 2009Casual Living Worldwide, Inc.Woven articles from synthetic self twisted yarns
US7823979Jan 30, 2009Nov 2, 2010Casual Living Worldwide, Inc.Woven articles from synthetic yarn
US7892989Jul 29, 2004Feb 22, 2011Casual Living Worldwide, Inc.Woven articles from synthetic self twisted yarns
US20120015137 *Oct 21, 2008Jan 19, 2012Paper Art Product LtdPaper-based composite material
Classifications
U.S. Classification139/420.00B
International ClassificationD03D25/00
Cooperative ClassificationD03D25/00, D03D2700/0151
European ClassificationD03D25/00