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Publication numberUS2929674 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 22, 1960
Filing dateApr 12, 1954
Priority dateApr 13, 1950
Publication numberUS 2929674 A, US 2929674A, US-A-2929674, US2929674 A, US2929674A
InventorsDavid Tann
Original AssigneeDavid Tann
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of automatic washing and extracting
US 2929674 A
Abstract  available in
Images(14)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 22, 1960 D. TANN METHOD OF AUTOMATIC WASHING AND EXTRACTING Original Filed April 13, 1950 14 Sheets-Sheet l uuuu' INVENTOR. ,Fd/Zd 7221/7.

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E- E El BY D. TANN March 22, 1960 METHOD OF AUTOMATIC WASHING AND EXTRACTING l4 Sheets-Sheet 10 Original Filed April 15, 1950 D. TANN March 22, 1960 METHOD OF AUTOMATIC WASHING AND EXTRACTING Original Filed April 13, 1950 14 Sheets-Sheet l1 .INVENTOR.

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I METHOD OF AUTOMATIC WASHING AND EXTRACTING Original Filed April 13, 1950 14 Sheets-Sheet 13 mmvrox Edi Z4 72/01.

METHOD OF AUTGMATIC WASHING AND EXTRAC'IING David Tann, Detroit, Mich.

2 Claims. (Cl. 8-159) This invention relates to fabric cleansing devices, and particularly to a cleansing device which is operated at a constant speed automatically to produce a cleansing, rinsing, extracting and drying operation on fabrics.

This application is a division of my copending application Serial Number 155,682, filed April 13, 1950, now abandoned, my subsequent application Serial No. 538,864, new Patent No. 2,758,461, having been filed on Gctober 6, 1955, as a continuation-in-part and as a consolidation of subject-matter of said application Serial No. 155,682 and of my subsequently abandoned application Serial No. 306,118, filed August 25, 1952.

Difliculty has been experienced when utilizing automatic types of fabric cleansing machines which inco'rporate damp-drying in the cycle of operation since the best known principle of extraction was that produced centrifugally by increasing the speed of rotation of the rotor. When low extracting speeds were employed, the extracting operation produced only a partial removal of excess fluid so that more than a pound of fluid remained in each pound of fabrics. When higher extracting speeds were employed, bringing the extracting ratio below a pound of fluid per pound of fabrics, damage due to stretching and tearing resulted to the fabrics because of the increased forces applied thereto. Further, the increased speed employed for extraction required costly clutch and gear mechanisms, as well as controls, and also made it necessary to anchor the machine in some manner to the floor. This required the actual bolting of the machine to the floor or the provision of cups or other means which prevented the machine from traveling thereover.

When practicing the present invention, extraction is produced at the same speed utilized for the cleansing operation. A belt of absorbing material is disposed in engagement with the peripheral wall of the rotor in which the fabrics are tumbled as the belt and rotor are driven in synchronism. During the washing or cleansing operation, the belt may be driven to drive the rotor at a predetermined speed to produce the proper raising and tumbling of the fabrics through the cleansing fluid. Thereafter, the fluid is drained from the tub in which the rotor operates and extraction is produced by the absorption of the water in the fabrics through the permeable pelipheral wall of the rotor by the belt which takes up the fluid which passes through the wall.

A pair of pressure rollers may be employed which functions as wringer rolls for squeezing the fluid from the belt as it is advanced therethrough. Suction or other means may also be employed for removing the fluid from the fabrics and belt or other absorbing element. The driving of the rollers produces the driving of the belt and the rotation of the rotor. The belt may be disposed about the entire periperal wall of the rotor and the rollers employed in engagement with the wall and belt to extract the fluid therefrom, or the belt may encompass the greater portion of the peripheral wall and have a portion ex- StatesPatent O ice tending therefrom which passes through the wringer rolls or moved across fluid extracting means, or a short loop of belt may be utilized in engagement with only a portion of the peripheral wall.

A portion of the fabrics is constantly being raised along one side of the rotor or drum as the rotor is driven in rotation in one direction from which they tumble near the top of the rotor or drum downwardly across the rotor axis to the lower opposite side of the rotor. The falling of the fabrics upon the pervious peripheral wall will cause the fluid thereof to be forced toward and through the wall onto the belt. When a short loop of belt is utilized, it is preferably disposed at the portion of th periphery onto which the fabrics are tumbled.

The pervious wall may be made of moisture-absorbing. material, such as fabric, or it may be made of metal having apertures therethrough, or it may be made of apertured metal having fabric on the inner wall to prevent buttons and string-ends of the fabric from pro jecting through the apertures. A solid wall may be employed having an inner fabric lining against which a roller is pressed as the rotor or drum is oscillated an amount less than 360 for squeezing the fluid directly from theinner fabric, the fluid thus extracted being conducted from the interior of the rotor.

It is also within the purview of the invention to have the wall and belt provided with suction cups and apertures so that the suction cup, if in the belt, can be fiattened, or the belt can be forced into the suction recesses of the peripheral wall, by a roller applied against the belt at the point where the fabrics are tumbled onto the rotor for producing a suction on the fluid in the fabrics. It is apparent, therefore, that various types of structures may be employed for practicing the invention which embodies the extraction of fluid from fabrics within a rotor by absorbing the fluid from the fabrics and removing the fluid from the absorbing medium while operating the machine at a slow constant speed.

Automatic means are employed for operating the machine through the cycle, which may be produced by a mechanical timing means or by electric timing means, both of which are old in the art. Simplified control mechanism is utilized; for example, the initial fluid level is controlled manually, the depth of the rinse water is controlled by an overflow drain pipe provided at a predetermined height in the tub, and pulleys and belts are employed to produce the rotation of the rotor at a constant speed throughout the entire cycle of operation of the machine. A sump may be employed for retaining the suds when a washing operation is employed, or the cleansingfiuid when a cleansing operation is to be mi lized, and it is to be understood that the machine may be employed as a clothes washing machine or as a drycleaning machine, depending upon the fluid which is employed. Therefore, it is to be understood that when a washing operation is described for a machine, a similar cycle of operation may be utilized for producing a drycleaning operation upon the fabrics.

It is within the purview of the invention to utilize a drying system for the fabrics after the cleansing operation so that a complete cycle of cleansing, rinsing, wetdrying and complete drying may be performed by the machine. Preferably a blo'wer is driven by the same motor which drives the rotor for producing a flow of air through the tub and container, over the fabrics. The air is heated by a gas burner or by an electric heating element or other means before being directed into the machine. A lint trap may be provided in the outlet conduit of the drying system which receives a predetermined depth of the fluid drained from the tub onto which the return air from the tub is directed so that the lint thereof may be'picked up bythe-fiuid without being blown into a room or collected in the machine to. form a fire hazard.

Accordingly, one object of the invention is to provide a fabric cleansing'machine whichis driven at a constant speed through an entire cleansing and wet-drying cycle 'without requiring the machine to be anchored to the floor.

Afurth er object of the invention 'is to provide a fabric cleansing machine which produces an extracting operation on the fabrics through the absorption of the fluid by an absorbing element from which the fluid is removed by vacuum, squeeze pressure or the like.

Another object of the invention is to provide a fabric cleansing machine with a rotor having a pervious peripheral wall against which the fabrics are tumbled to urge the fluid therein toward and through the wall against plete cleansing and drying operation during a single cycle n of operation of the machine.

Other objects and features of novelty of the invention will be specifically pointed out or will become apparent when referring, for. a better understanding of the invention, to the followingdescription taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure 1 is a front elevational view of a preferred embodiment of the invention;

, Fig. 2 is a plan view of the structure illustrated in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a greatly enlarged transverse sectional view of the structure illustrated in Fig. 1, taken substantially along the line 3-3 thereof;

Fig. 4 is a broken sectional view of the structure illustrated in Fig. 3, taken substantially along the line 4-4 thereof; Y Y

' Fig. 5 is a broken sectional view of the structure illus trated in Fig. 4, taken substantially along the line 5-5 thereof;

Fig. 6 is a broken enlarged sectional view of a modi- V fication showing .an-alternative mounting for the timer pulley;

Fig. 7 is an enlarged' s'ectional view of the structure 7 illustrated in Fig. 3, taken substantially; along the line 7-7 thereof;

Fig. 8' is av broken elevational view of the structure illustrated in Fig. 5, taken from the lines-8 thereof;

Fig. 9 is an enlarged diagrammatic view of one of the control knobs; p

Fig. 10 is an enlarged diagrammatic view of the other control knob;

Fig. 11 is an enlarged sectional view of the structure illustrated in Fig. 3, taken substantially along the line 11-11 thereof;

Fig. 12 is a broken sectional view of the structure illustrated in Fig. 1, taken substantially along the line 12-12 thereof;

Fig; 13, is an enlarged sectional View of the structureillustrated in Fig. 7, taken'substantially along the line 13-13 thereof;

Fig. .14 is a greatly enlarged broken view of that portion of the structure illustrated in Fig. 4, indicated by the broken line 14 therein; H i

Fig. .15 is a sectional view similar to Fig. 14, illustrating a modification of the invention; I

Fig. 16 is a sectional view 'similar'to Fig. 14, illustrat I ing a further, modification of. the invention;

' Fig. 17 is a diagrammatic view of the water circuits of the structure illustrated in Fig. 1;

Fig. 18 is a chart showing the positions of the switch and valves of the machine illustrated in .Figs. 1 to 17, during an illustrative automatic washing cycle;

'Figs. 19, 20 and 21 are somewhat diagrammatic perspective views of modified forms of the invention;

Fig. 22 is ,a somewhat diagrammatic elevational view of a further modified form of the invention; 7

Figs. 23 and 24 are somewhat diagrammatic sectional views of other modifiedforrns of the invention;

Fig. 25 is a broken elevational view of the structure illustrated in Fig. 24, taken from the line 25-25 thereof;

Fig. 26 is a sectional view of the structure illustrated in Fig. 24,. taken substantially along the line 26-26 thereof. I

Fig. 27 is a somewhat diagrammatic perspective view of another modified form of the invention; 7

Fig. 28 is a broken sectional view ofthe structure illustrated in Fig. 27, taken substantially along the line 28-23 thereof;

Fig; 29 is a broken sectional view similar to Fig. 28, showing anothermodification of the invention;

Fig. 30 is a sectional view of a modified form of the invention showing a combination automatic washing ma chine and clothes drier; i

Fig. 31 is a broken enlargedsectional view of the structure illustrated in Fig. 30, taken substantially along the line 31-31 thereof;

Fig. 32 is a broken sectional view of the structure illustrated in Fig. 30, taken substantially along the line 32-32 thereof; i i V Fig. 33 is a broken sectional view of the structure illustrated in Fig. 32, taken substantially'along the line 33-33 thereof; i i

Fig. 34 is a somewhat diagrammatic perspective View of a further modified. form of the invention;

Fig. 35 is' a broken sectional view of the structure illustrated in-Fig. 33, taken substantially along the line 35-35 thereof; F

Fig. 36 is a diagrammatic illustration of a part of the drive for and water circuits of the machine illustrated in Fig. 30;

Fig. 37 is a diagrammatic view similar to a portion of Fig. 36 showing a-further modification of the invention;

Fig, 38 is a'brokensectio'nal view similar to Figs. 4 and 30, showing another modification of the invention;

Fig. 39 is a broken enlarged sectional view of the structure illustrated in Fig. 38,; taken substantially along the line 33-39 thereof.

Fig. 40 is a broken sectional view of the structure illustrated in Fig. 39,. taken substantially along the line 40-40 thereof;

Fig. 41 is a broken eularged sectional view; of the structure illustrated in Fig540, taken substantially along the line 41-41 thereof;

Fig. 42 is a broken sectional view showing'a further modification of the invention; and I Fig. 43 is an enlarged sectional view of the structure illustrated in Fig. 21, taken on the line. 43-43 thereof.

Referring to the drawings, and more particularly to Figs. 1 through 17, inclusive, the preferred embodiment of the applicants improved automatic washing machine there illustrated generally comprises a cabinet :0 sup porting a tub 42 in which a drum 44 is rotatably supported, and which has a cylindrical outer wall portion 46 adapted to readily pass water therethrough, a band or belt 48 trained about the cylindrical wall 46 which is adapted to absorb water. passing through the wall 4s, a pair of wringer rolls 50 and 52 between which the band 48 is trained, a motor 54 drivingly connected to one of the rolls, suitable connectionsfor supplying water to and removing it from the tub 42, and asuitable control mechanism 55, for controlling the supply of water to and draining. of watcriiomthe-tub 42"and the opera.-

tion of the motor 54. The above mentioned control mechanism 55, which will be hereinafter described, is adapted upon initial actuation to automatically provide a cycle including a desired combination of washing, draining, rinsing and damp-drying operations. During these operations the drum 44 is driven by means of the belt 48 from the wringer rolls 50 and 52, the belt 48 performing the dual functions of driving the drum 44 and, during the draining and damp-dry operations, of absorbing water from the water permeable peripheral wall 46 of the drum 44 and carrying this Water to the wringer rolls t and 52, Where it is extracted from the belt 48 and permitted to drain.

Considering the above generally mentioned elements of the applicants improved automatic washing machine in greater detail, the cabinet 46 includes a suitable supporting frame 56, which in the construction illustrated is formed of a plurality of interconnected angle irons, and which is enclosed by suitable front, side and rear panels 58, 6t: and 62. The tub 42 is generally cylindrical in shape with its axis disposed horizontally and extending at right angles to the front and rear panels 58 and 62. At the front side of the cabinet 49, the cylindrical wall of the tub 42 has a radially inwardly extending flange portion indicated at 64 defining a central opening 66 normally 1 closed by a door 68 which is mounted in the opening 66 and provided with a suitable sealing gasket 79. The door 63 preferably has a glass panel 72 in which is mounted a small door 74 and chute 76 through which soap may be supplied to the tub 42. The tub 42 is closed at the rear end, by a plate 78 which is secured to an outwardly turned flange 8i integrally formed on the cylindrical wall of the tub 42, by screws 82. A suitable annular sealing gasket 84 is disposed between the plate 78 and the flange 8t).

The drum 44 comprises a front wall plate 86, a rear wall plate 88 parallel thereto and the cylindrical wall 46 which is secured to the front and rear plates 86 and 88 and spaced a small distance inwardly from the peripheries of the plates 86 and 68 so that the outer peripheral portions of these plates provide shoulders 90 which serve as a guide to prevent the belt 48 from moving axially of the drum 44.

The drum 44 is rotatably supported in the tub 42 by a centrally disposed tubular shaft 92 which extends rearwardly from the rear wall 83 and is supported by suitable reinforcing ribs 94 welded or otherwise suitably secured to the outer surface of the rear wall plate 88. The shaft 92 is journaled in a shaft 96, supported on and projecting inwardly from the rear end plate 73 of the tub 42, which is provided with suitable reinforcing ribs 98. In the construction illustrated, the shaft 96 is provided with a bearing sleeve 1%. The front plate 86 of the drum 44 has an annular peripheral portion outwardly turned to provide a cylindrical flange 1&2 which defines a central opening aligned with the opening 66 at the front of the tub 42 and which also provides a bearing surface for supporting the drum 44 at the front end thereof. This support is provided by a pair of rollers 194 carried at opposite ends of a rocker arm 1S6 which is pivotally supported at its center on a screw 1G3 threaded into a nut 11d welded or otherwise secured to the radially inwardly projecting flange 54 at the inner side of the tub 42 and directly below the door opening 66. The rollers 1 4 are spaced at opposite sides of the center of the drum 44, as best illustrated in Figure 1.

Water is supplied to the tub 42 through a water supply line 112 which extends centrally through the rear Wall 3 and axially through the tubular shaft 92 carried by the drum 44. At its inner end the supply line 112 is provided with a plurality of small apertures 114 through which incoming water is supplied into the interior of the drum 44. It will be appreciated that the water line 112 is stationary and that the shaft 92 turns with the drum 44. A suitable annular seal 116 is provided-between 6 the shaft 92 and the water supply line 112. Spaced slightly below the inwardly projecting shaft 96, the rear end 78 of the tub 42 carries an outwardly extending elbow welded thereto and connected to a suitable hose to provide an overflow line 118. This line 118 prevents excessive filling of the tub 42. In this embodiment of the invention, the front and rear end plates 86 and 88 of the drum 44 are interconnected and held in fixed relation relative to one another by-four equiangularly spaced baffles 120, which are formed of sheet metal strips which are longitudinally reversely folded to a generally V-shape, best illustrated in Fig. 4 and the marginal portions of which are outwardly flanged as indicated at 122. These flange portions 122 are disposed with their outer surfaces lying in a cylindrical surface spaced radially inwardly of the periphery of the end walls 86 and 88 and adapted to support the water permeable cylindrical wall 46. It will be appreciated that generically the cylindrical wall 46 may be formed of any suitable water permeable material including, by way of illustration, expanded metal, suitable fabrics of organic or inorganic material, sponge, sponge rubber, or any other material having suitable durability and water permeable characteristics. In the construction illustrated in Figs. 4, 5 and 14, the cylindriwall 46 is formed of a suitable fabric and is supported intermediate the baffles 129 by a plurality of spaced rods 124 having reduced end portions 126 which project through apertures provided in the end plates 86 and 88'. The rods 124 are flexible to permit them to be flexed so that the end portions 126 may be inserted into and removed from the co-operating aperture in the end plates 86 and 88. In the construction illustrated in Figs. 4, 5 and 14, the fabric wall 46 is stitched together as indicated at 128, at the outer side of the rods 124.

Figs. 15 and 16 illustrate modified construction of the water permeable wall 46. In the construction illustrated in Fig. 15, two layers of fabric are employed, which pass respectively on the radially inner and outer sides of the rods 124 and which are stitched together as indicated at 130 intermediate the rods 124. In the modified construction illustrated in Fig. 16, a single continuous layer of fabric passes on the radially outer sides of the rods 124, the inner sides of which are covered by strips of fabric 132 extending along the rods 124 and ewed to the fabric wall 46 at opposite sides of the rods 124, as indicated at 134.

The tub has an opening 136 in the lower side thereof which underlies the drum 44 and is of a length slightly greater than the width of the belt 43. The opening 136 extends circumferentially of the tub 42, from its lowermost point at the center thereof, in the direction of rotation of the drum 44, as is best seen in Fig. 4. Through this opening 136, the tub 42 communicates with a V-shaped trough or sump 138 which is sealed to the tub 42 beyond the peripheries of the opening 136. The wringer rolls 5i) and 52 are disposed within the sump 138 and are rotatably supported in castings 140 and 142 secured to the front and rear ends of the'sump 138. In the construction illustrated, the upper roll 50 is the driven roll and is supported by the castings 140 and 142 for rotation about a fixed axis. The trunnion 144 at the left hand end of the roll 56, as viewed in Fig. 5, is journaled in a bearing 146 carried in the casting 149 and the trunnion 148 at the opposite or right hand end thereof, as viewed in Fig. 5, is supported in and drivingly engaged by a shaft 15% journaled in a bearing 152 carried in the casting 142. The shaft 156 extends outwardly of the casting 142 and carries a pulley wheel 154 which is driven from the motor 54 by a V-belt 156. The shaft 15% also carries a timer pulley 158 from which the above mentioned control mechanism 55 is driven, as hereinafter described.

Fig. 6 shows a modified construction in which the timer pulley 158' rotates with the drum 44 rather than the wringer roll 50. the construction there shown,-

the shaft 96' carried by the rear wall 78 of the' tub 42 extends outwardly rather than inwardly andthe hollow shaft 92 has a reduced end portionprojecting outwardlyof the shaft 96 and to which the pulley wheel V shaft 92 around the water supply line-112. The shaft as, at its inner end, carries a second seal 117 preventing the escape of water between the shafts'92 and 96C" The lower roll 52 has its oPPQsitelyextending trunnions 16a? and 162 journaled in bearing blocks 164 and 166 slidably supported in the castings 149 and 1G2," respectively, for sliding movement. toward and away from the axis of the roll 59; These bearing blocks 164 and lo'are urged toward the roll 53 by'springs 163 and 17d housed inthe castings 149 and 142, respectively, and one end of which act against adjustable seats 172 which may be moved vertically to adjust the l'oadingoi the springs and 17% by means'of screws 17 i and 17s extending: outwardly o castings 144) and 142.

Accordingly; it will'be. appreciated that the adjustment' of the screws 17a and 176 is effective to vary the pressure which the rolls i and 52' exert upon the belt 43 passing therebetween.

The belt 48 is continuous and may be of anysuitable,

material adapted to absorb or entrain water from the wall 46 of the drum 44 and'carry it to the sump 138 where it may be removed by the action of the, rolls 5% i and 52; By'way'ot example, the belt 48 may be formed of any suitable fabric of either organic or inorganic ma terial, or may include a suitable rubber sponge, or any other material having the desired characteristics'of durability and ability to carry absorbed or entrained water.

Also, within the sump 138 an idler roll 178 is mounted adjacent theedge of the opening-136 through which the belt 48 moves into the sump S138, and is supported for rotation about a fixed axis. The belt 48 is trained over the idler roller 178, from which it passes between the rolls 5d and 52. ltreverses its course around the wringer roll 50 from which it is trained over a take-up roll 1559, the opposite ends of which are rotatably supported in bearing blocks 182 which are slidably mounted in channels 184 and urged by springs 386 in a direction to take up the-slack in the belt 43, i.e., to the right as viewed in'Pig. 4. Suitable means (not shown) may be provided for'adjusting the'loading of thefsprings 186, whereby the tension in the belt 43 may be readily adjusted.

A drain line 13a is connected to the bottom of the 31121119133 and leads'to a lint trap or strainer 19%, the

outlet side of which is connected by a line 1&2 to a drain valve 394 which is in turn connected through a line 195 to a pump 197. The strainerifill is of the type in which the water flows into a central cartridge 1%, from portion ofthe strainer connected to the out'et line 192.

The lint and other foreign material is collected in the cartridge 196 which may be readily'rernoved for cleaning out the lint. The overflow line 118 is connected to the drainline beyond the valve i9 5 and in the construction illustrated,.-discharges into the line 1%, as best, shown in Fi s. 3 and 17.

The washing machine is provided with twocontrol lanobs 3.93 and 2% disposed'at the right and left hand any desired washingperiode Asillustrated in Eigr L2,.

to a plate216 disposed adjacent the bottom of the cab-' inet di and supported on the frame 56. The control mechanism 55 is disposed at the right hand side of the cabinet as, as viewed from the front as is clearly illustrated in Figs. 3 and 4. The cam shaft 212. is journaled in bearings 218 and 22% carried by the base 21 The control knob 193 is connected by means of a shaft, not shown, to a sprocket wheel 222 over which is trained a chain 224, which is also trained over another sprocket wheel 226 fixed to a second cam shaft 228 jour naled in bearings 23:) and 232 carried by the base 214. The cam shaft 228 carries a pair of cams 234 and 236 which are adapted to engage rocker arms 238 and 249 respectively, which are pivotally mounted at their lower ends on a rocker shaft 2 i2pivotally supported on the base 214. ,7 At their upper ends the rocker arms 233 and 24s engage pins actuating valves 24d and 246 which respectively control the how of water in hot and cold water lines 248 and 250. The position of the pins controlling the valves 244 and 246 determines the mixture of water which flows from the lines 243 and 250 into the single water supply line 312. The shape of the cams 234 and 246 (which is not'shown in the drawings) is such that as the control knob 1% is rotated from the off position, illutrat'ed in Fig. .10, in a counterclockwise direction, the

temperature of the water supplied to the line 7.12. is gradu ally increased from a minimum to a maximum. The control knob 198 is manually'operated and is rotated to a position corresponding to the water temperature desired by the operator and is left in this position until the tub 42 is filled to the position indicated by the water level indicator-mark 251 carried by the glass 72 in the door-'68. The control knob 1% is then returned to the off position. It will be appreciated that more than one mark 251 may be provided on the door 63 to correspond to different types of clothes to be washed in the machine.

intermediate the bearings 21% and 220, the cam shaft 212 carries a first'cam 2:52 adapted upon initial rotation of he control knob 2% ion clockwise direction, as viewed in Figs. 1 and 9, to actuate'a micro switch 2:74am! start lines in Figs; 3 and 7, for turning on a heating element when used in the combination automatic washing machine which it flows out through filter openings into an outer and clothes drier illustrated in Figs. through 33, in-

", elusive. and through 37 inclusive, as hereinafter described. When the motor 54 is started, as above described, the wringer roll 5% is driven through the pulley belt 155, and the Wringer roll 58 in turn drives the drum 34 through the belt 48. Rotation of the wringer roll 5% also results in rotation of the timer pulley 158, which is secured to the shaft 15%} through which the wringer roll is driven. A V-belt 269 is trained over the timer pulley 153 and over another pulley 252 secured to an idler shaft 264 iournaled at one end'in a bearing mounted on the frame and journaled at its other'eu'd in a bearing 268 carried by the base 214 of the control mechanism 55. The idler shaft 264 is drivingly connected to a short shaft 276 which is disposed coaxially with the cam shaft 212 and journaled in a bearing 272 carried by the base This shaftffil? has a socket 274 in one. in which is received one end of the cam shaft 212. A one way clutch, illustrated in Figs. 7 and 13, is provided by means of which the short shaft 27% may drive the cam shaft 212 in' a clockwise direction, as

' viewedin Fig, 13. This :one way clutch is of conventional type, including a spherical roller 276 disposed in a spiral recess 273 in the shaft 270 and communicating with the socket 274. It will be appreciated that upon rotation of the shaft 270 in a clockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 13, the ball 276 will become wedged against the cam shaft 212, causing the latter to turn with the shaft 270, but that upon rotation of the cam shaft 212 in a clockwise direction relative to the shaft 270, the ball 276 will move into the enlarged end of the spiral recess 278 and out of wedging engagement with the cam shaft 212. It will be appreciated that this one way clutch permits manual advancement of the cycle of operations as desired, simply by rotating the control knob 2430 in a clockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 9.

The above mentioned driving connection of the idler shaft 264 to the shaft 270 is through a speed reducer mechanism best illustrated in Fig. 11. A gear 280, having a single tooth 232, is fixed on the idler shaft 264 and is disposed to engage a gear 284 mounted on a second idler shaft 286 so that once each revolution of the shaft 264, the tooth 282 engages the gear 284 which has a plurality of teeth uniformly spaced about its periphery, and effects a small angular rotation of the gear 284 and the shaft 2236 upon which it is fixed. The idler shaft 286 also carries another gear 283 having a single tooth 294}, which is adapted to engage a gear 292 fixed on the short shaft 270 and has a plurality of teeth uniformly spaced about its periphery. It will now be appreciated that as the shaft 236 is driven, as above described, once each revolution of the gear 288 the tooth 290 will engage the gear 292 and effect a small angular rotation of the shaft 270 to which the gear 292 is fixed.

It will now be appreciated that when the motor 54 is started by rotation of the cam shaft 212, by turning the knob 2% in a clockwise direction, the shaft 270 will be driven in a clockwise direction by the motor through the timer pulley 158 and the just described speed reducer apparatus illustrated in Fig. 11, and will, accordingly, continue to drive the cam shaft 212 in a clockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 13, through the one way clutch construction there illustrated. When the timer pulley is mounted for rotation with the drum 44, as shown in Fig. 6, by properly proportioning the sizes of the pulley wheels, the speed reducer mechanism illustrated in Fig. 11 may be eliminated. This, of course, is for the reason that the drum 44 turns much slower than the Wringer roll 50.

The cam shaft 212, intermediate the bearing 220 and the adjacent end thereof, which is received in and drivingly engaged by the shaft 270, carries a pair of cams 2% and 296 which are adapted to engage the rocker arms 238 and 240, respectively. These cams 294 and 296 are shaped (not shown in the drawings) to move the rocker arms 238 and 249 at the desired intervals and to the desired extent to provide water of the desired temperature to the tub 42 through the line 112 as required in the cycle of operations of the washing machine, as hereinafter described.

The cam shaft 212 also carries another cam 298 adapted to engage one end of a push rod 300, slidably supported in a bearing 302 carried by the control mechanism base 214, the other end of which is connected to the valve element 3% of the drain valve 194. The valve element 304 is urged to its seated or closed position by a spring 366. The cam 298 is shaped to unseat the valve element 3G4 and open the drain valve 194 at the desired times and for the desired intervals, as required in the cycle of operations, as hereinafter described.

It will be appreciated that generically the cycle of operations of the present improved automatic washing machine may include any number of washing, rinsing and damp-drying periods of any desired length and arranged in any desired order. In a preferred embodiment of the applicants improved automatic washing machine, the various cams of the above described control mechanism 55 are proportioned to provide the cycle of operations" set forth in the chart shown in Fig. 18. The particular cycle of operations there set forth includes a washing period which may be of any desired length up to 15 minutes, depending upon the position to which the control knob 209 is turned to initiate the cycle of operations, a draining period of six minutes, a warm water rinse period of two minutes duration, a cold water rinse period of live minutes duration, and a damp-drying period of ten minutes duration. The chart shown in Fig. 18 illustrates the positions of the motor switch 254, the drain valve 194, the hot water valve 244, and the cold water valve 246, when the control knob 290 is in the off position and during each of the above mentioned washing, draining, rinsing, and damp-drying periods.

It will now be appreciated that an operator desiring to wash clothes in the applicants improved automatic washing machine needs only to place the clothes to be washed within the drum 44, to turn the control knob 198 to fill the tub 42 with water of the desired tempera ture, return the knob 198 to the off position when the tub is filled to the proper level as indicated by the marker 251, add the proper amount of a suitable soap through the door 74 provided for that purpose, and rotate the control knob 200 in a counterclockwise direction until the arrow 308 (see Fig. 9) points at the number of minutes desired for the washing period. It may be noted here that if the control knob 198 is not returned to the off position, the water level will continue to rise about the proper elevation indicated by the marker 251 until it reaches the opening to the overflow line 118. Since a higher level of water is desired during the rinsing than during washing, the overflow line 118 is connected to the tub at an elevation corresponding to the maximum level desired in rinsing. It will be appreciated that once the cycle of operations is initiated by the above mentioned turning of the knob 206, the cam shaft 212 which controls the cycle of operations will be driven by the motor through the shaft 270 and the complete cycle of operations will be performed. Upon completion of the damp-drying period, the control knob 20% and cam shaft 212 will be returned to the off position, in which position the motor switch 254 is opened, and the drain valve 194 and the hot and cold water valves 244 and 246 will be closed.

During the operation of the machine, the speed of rotation of the drum 44 is preferably such that the clothes within the drum 44, which rotates in a clockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 4, will be carried upwardly by the baffles 126 to a position in the upper left hand quadrant of the tub as there viewed, from which the clothes will fall more or less diametrically across the drum 44 and slap against the water permeable cylindrical wall 46 of the drum .4 at the lower left hand quadrant thereof, as viewed in Fig. 4. During the washing interval this action provides an agitation resulting in a very efficient cleaning action. It will be noted that the drum 44 rotates continuously during the operation of the machine throughout all of the washing, draining, rinsing and damp-drying intervals. During the rinsing interval, the above described movement of the clothes produced by the baffles provides the requisite agitation for an efiicient rinsing of the clothes. It will be noted from Fig. 18 that during the draining interval, the second or cold water rinsing interval, and the following damp-drying interval, the drain valve 194 is open. During these intervals the water in the clothes being washed passes into or through the water permeable cylindrical wall 46 of the drum 44 and is absorbed by the belt 48 which carries the water into the sump 138 where it is extracted from the belt 48 by the wringer rolls 50 and 52 and passes out the drain. The above mentioned action of the bffles 120, in causing the clothes to slap against the wall 46 at the lower right hand quadrant thereof, as viewed in Fig. 4, facilitates this removal of the water from the clothes and a very rapid 'trated in Figs. 19 through 29, inclusive and Fig. 34.

Referring 'to Fig. 19, in the modification ther illustrated, the drum 310 difiers from the above described drum 44 in that the cylindrical wall 312 is formed of a metal screen rather than the absorbent facric material 46. it will be appreciated that the slapping action eifected by the baffles 129 will cause water from the clothes to be absorbed by the belt 48, from which it is removed by the wringe'r rollsStl and 52. Fig. 19 illustrates that, rather than being disposed in a sump at the bottom of the tub; the wringer rolls and 52 may be disposed at the upper right hand quadrant of the drum 31), as there illustrated. A trough 314 is provided to catch water removed from the belt 48 by the rollers 5% and 52, and slopes downwardly toward its rear from which the water is suitably drained so that it does not run back onto the belt 48. It will be noted that in this construction, with the wringer rolls5 and 52 disposed at the upper right hand side of the drum 316, the only portion of the cylindrical wall 312 not in contact with the belt 48 is the upper right hand portion which is not in contact with any clothes.

The modified form illustrated in Fig. 20 is similar to the construction illustrated in Fig. 19 and diifers therefrom in that a take-up roll 316 is provided which is urged by a spring 318 in a direction to take up the slack in the beltS and in this construction the rolls 5% and 52 are disposed intermediate the take-up rollfii and the drum 310. Water removed fromthe belt 43 by the rolls 5% and 52 falls onto a trough 329 which slopes toward the rear of the machine where it passes into a drain line 322 leading into the lower part of the tub and preventing this water from falling onto the belt 48 or into the drum 31d.

Referring to Fig..21 and Fig. 43, a belt 324 is employed with the drum which may be of the same or similar material as the belt 48, but which is of a'length Suficientonly to closely fit over the pervious cylindrical "wall 312. 'A suction roll 311 is disposed in the lower right hand quadrant of the drum 31% and a similar roll 511 or an idler wringer roll 52 may be employed at the lower left hand quadrant of the drum. The roll 311 embodies a cylindrical sleeve 313 having a a plurality of closely disposed rowsof apertures 315extending through the wall thereof. The sleeve rotates on afixed cylindrical the'wall 46 of the drum 44 in the lower right'and left and cooperate therewith to extract water from the water absorbent covering 330 on these rollers. The rollers 332 support 33.7 mounted at each end on supporting brackets 319. A pulley 321 is secured to one end of the sleeve 313 driven by a belt from a motor illustrated in the figure. The motor also drives a vacuum pump 323,;the intake to which is connected to an aperture 325 'in the cylindrical support 317 from which a slot 327 extends along the support parallel with the support axis. A suction is provided by a pumplthrough the slot-327 and the rows of apertures 315 in the sleeve, as the rows of apertures pass thereover as the sleeve is driven. The suction removes a portion of theliquid contained in the belt 324 as the sleeve and belt roll in engagement with each other. The liquid drawn into the pump 323 is discharged'therefrom to drain or into the tub (not shown) from the discharge conduit 329; As indicated above, a plurality of the suction rolls 3,11 maybe employed in engagement with the ,belt spaced about the. periphery of the drum, or an 'idler roller 52 may be utilized opposite the single suction roll 31?. as illustrated in the figure.

330. These rollers 326 and 328 are disposed'to1 contact:

and ,334 are driven through pulleys, 33d and 335 from the motor 54 through belts 340 and 342. V

in the'modification of the invention illustrated in Fig. 23, the drum 44 is mounted for rotation in a tub 344 which is appreciably larger than the drum 44. The drum 4% is disposed in the upper portion of the tub 344, and is driven by' an endless belt 346 which is trained over a roller 348 mounted for rotation about a fixed axis in the lower left hand side of the drum 44, and a second roller 359 mounted adjacent-the lower righthand periphery of the drum 44. These rollers 348 and 35B are disposed so that the belt 346 isheld in contact with the water permeable cylindrical wall 46 of the drum 44 at and intermediate the rollers 34$ and 35%. Below the center of the drum 44 an idler roller 352 is provided for holding the lower course of the belt 346 out of contact with the upper course, which is to contact with the drum wall 46. A pair of springs indicated at 354 are provided for urging the roller 35b. tangentially of the drum 344 in a direction away from the roller 348 to wringer action and extract water from the belt 346. The roller 348 is driven from the motor 54 by a belt 353 through a pulley 369. A drain line 362 is provided at the lowermost point of the tub'344. The roller 3% also drives a belt 341 which drives a blower343, the intake to which is connected by a duct 345 to an opening 34'? in the wall of the tub 344. An intake duct 349, connected to an opening in the tub, has heating element 351 therein for heating the intake air as itis drawn into the tub by the blower. When the machine includes a drying operation after the fabrics have been washed, rinsed and damp-dried or have been cleaned and dampdried, the continuous operation of the blower becomes effective to dry the fabrics upon the energization of the heating element 351. 1

A further modification of the invention is illustrated in Figs. 24, 25 and 26, in which a portion of the cabinet is indicated at 364 and a portion of the tub is indicated at 365'. The drum 366, which is mounted in the tub 363, isformed of sheet metal and includes an unbroken sheet metal cylindrical wall 368. The drum 366 also has a radially inwardly projecting bathe 37dv similar to the baffies .120 of the embodiment ,illustrated in Figs. 1 through 17, inclusive, and described above. The remainder or" the inner surface of the cylindrical wall 368, except for that portion occupied by the bafiie 370, is covered by a water absorbent material 372. This water absorbent covering 372 may be secured to the drum wall 368 in any suitable manner such, for example, as by a suitable adhesive not interfering with thea'osorbent charannular centrally disposed outwardly turned. flange 3'74 extending through the rear wall of the tub 365 and sealed relativei thereto by the seal 375. 'A pulley wheel 376 is secured to the flange 374, and is driven from the motor 54 throughfa belt'373. In this modification of the invention; the drum 366 does not rotate continuously but oscillates from one position in. which the bathe 376 cccupies the position indicated in Fig. 26 by the line 377, through roughly 270 degrees of movement to the position indicated by the line 379 in Fig. 26. in this modification, apertures 381 are provided in the end walls or the drum see, in the bathe 370 and in the cylindrical wall 363 into the tub and-vice versa.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification8/159, 68/19.1, 8/137, 34/58, 34/71, 34/335, 68/20, 68/19, 68/153
International ClassificationD06F25/00, D06F58/02
Cooperative ClassificationD06F58/02, D06F25/00
European ClassificationD06F58/02, D06F25/00