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Publication numberUS2930432 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 29, 1960
Filing dateJul 25, 1955
Priority dateJul 25, 1955
Publication numberUS 2930432 A, US 2930432A, US-A-2930432, US2930432 A, US2930432A
InventorsWilliam A Engstrom
Original AssigneeContinental Motors Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic carburetor adjustment for burning of different fuels
US 2930432 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent O AUTOMATIC CARBURETOR ADJUSTMENT FOR BURNING OF DIFFERENT FUELS William A. Engstrom, Muskegon, Mich., assignor to Continental Motors Corporation, Muskegon, Mich., a corporation of Virginia Application July 25, 1955, Serial No. 524,195

2 Claims.- (Cl. 158-36) My invention relates to internal combustion engines and more particularly to a fuel or fuel and air mixture control for such engines.

It is necessarily a requirement in engine design to now construct same for burning a wide variety of fuels, from diesel fuels to high octane gasoline, with the further requirement that same be burned without manual adjustments being required on the carburetor or fuel injector.

It is an object of my present invention to provide for the burning of a wide variety of fuels in carbureted engines, as well as in fuel injection engines, by constructing a control device responsive to the specific gravity of the fuel being used, which control device may be actuated to automatically adjust the jet of a carburetor or vary the fuel metering control of a fuel injection pump.

For a more detailed understanding of my invention, reference may be had to the accompanying drawing illustrating a preferred embodiment of my invention in which like characters refer to like parts throughout the several views, and in which- Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic view illustrating the entire control system,

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary view showing how a nozzle jet of a carburetor may be thus automatically adjusted, and

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary view showing the control system associated with a fuel metering valve of a fuel injection apparatus.

I have chosen to show the control system when applied to a carbureted engine, and referring more particularly to Fig. 1 of the drawing, 10 designates an internal combustion engine, 11 thel carburetor, 12 the conventional intake manifold, and 14 the conventional fuel pump.

A fuel supply tank 15 is provided for the storage of any one of a wide variety of fuels and suitable fuel lines 16 are employed to connect the fuel tank to the pump, and the pump outlet to the carburetor.

An auxiliary tank 17 is connected by the fuel line 18 to the supply tank 15, this connection being suitably controlled by a conventional oat actuated valve 19, said float 20 located within the auxilitary tank and being operated to maintain a constant level of fuel in said auxiliary tank. A oat hydrometer 21 of standard construction is slidably supported by guides 22, and as well known to those skilled in the art, this oat hydrometer is constructed to have a variable disposition in the fuel depending on the specific gravity of the fuel in which it lloats. It is known that a hydrometer type lloat will sink to various levels in fuels of various specific gravity, and for example it is noted that a standard oat hydrometer will sink two inches deeper in gasoline than it does in jet fuel.

Therefore, the variable relationship of a tloat type hydrometer and the liquid in which it is floated is utilized to operate a mercury switch 25 controlling the supply of electric current from battery 26 through conductors 27 to a solenoid actuator 28.

Referring to Fig. 2 it will be observed that suitable mechanical connections 29 from the actuator 28 to the needle valve 30 of the carburetor 11 are employed to adjust the carburetor jet, whereby to provide the proper size jet for the fuel being used for operating hte engine. In a fuel injection engine, various types of fuel metering ice devices may be employed to control the discharge of fuel` to the engine, many of these fuel metering devices embodying an angularly adjustable metering valve 35 of fuel injection pump 40 as illustrated in Fig.y 3. Connections 36 connect the solenoid actuator 28 to the angularly adjustable fuel metering valve to automatically effect the required adjustment for the fuelbeing used to operate the engine.

Any desired type of multiple contact mercury switch Z5 may be employed to control the desired operation of the solenoid actuator 28, and it' will be obvious that various degrees of adjustment may be had if so desired.

While I have illustrated but one embodiment of my invention, it will be apparent, however, to those skilled in the art to which my invention pertains that various changes and modifications may be made therein without departing from the spirit of my invention or from the scope' of the appended claims. j

I claim: Y

1. In an internal combustion engine, a fuel supply system operable to supply a combustible fuel charge to said engine and comprising a liquid fuel supply tank, a fuel pump having its inlet connected with said fuel supply tank, a regulable fuel metering means operable to meter fuel to said engine and connected with the fuel outlet of said fuel pump, said fuel pump supplying fuel under pressure to said fuel metering means, and control means for adjusting said fuel regulable means, said control means comprising an actuator operably connected with said fuel regulable means and a specific gravity sensing lloat hydrometer disposed in said fuel tank and remotely operably connected with said actuator to adjust same in response to a predetermined change of the specific gravity of the liquid fuel in said fuel tank to adjust said fuel metering means in accordance with said fuel specific gravity, and means maintaining a constant level of fuel in said fuel tank. t Y

2. In an internal combustion engine, a fuel supply system operable to supply a combustible fuel charge to said engine and comprising a liquid fuel supply tank, a fuel pump having its inlet connected with said fuel supply tank, a regulable fuel metering means operable to meter fuel to said engine and connected with the fuel outlet of said fuel pump, said fuel-pump supplying fuel under pressure to said fuel metering means, and control means for adjusting said fuel regulableY means, said control means comprising an actuator operably connected with said fuel regulable means and a specific gravity sensing float hydrometer disposed in said fuel tank and remotely operably connected with said actuator to adjust same in response to a predetermined change of the specic gravity of the liquid fuel in said fuel tank to adjust said fuelmetering means in accordance with said fuel specific gravity, said fuel supply tank having a main tank and an auxiliary tank connected with said main tank and provided with a oat actuated valve means operable to maintain aV substantially constant level of liquid fuel in said auxiliary tank, said actuator comprising a solenoid operable to adjust said fuel metering means, said oat hydrometer being buoyantly floated in the auxiliary tank fuel supply .and a switch operably connected with'said hydrometer and with said solenoid and operable to actuate said solenoid in response to changes of'buoyancy of said hydrometer eifected by predetermined specific gravity changes of said fuel.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,715,831 Catford etal. Aug. 23. 1955 2,930,4az.,V

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1760382 *Jan 23, 1926May 27, 1930Teesdale Mfg CompanyControlling means for electric switches
US2627906 *Feb 14, 1949Feb 10, 1953Rolls RoyceFuel metering system for internalcombustion engines
US2685917 *Mar 10, 1950Aug 10, 1954Perry StanleyOil burner
US2715831 *Sep 8, 1953Aug 23, 1955Napier & Son LtdApparatus for sensing changes in the specific gravity of a liquid
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3282323 *Apr 14, 1965Nov 1, 1966Gen ElectricViscosity responsive devices
US4524033 *Mar 31, 1983Jun 18, 1985Elledge Jefferson DMultiple fuel carburetor
US4594201 *Apr 16, 1984Jun 10, 1986Oliver V. PhillipsNon-venturi type camburetor
US5111650 *Jul 9, 1990May 12, 1992Palitex Project Company GmbhApparatus for refillilng a yarn wetting agent into a yarn wetting device for a textile machine
US5197569 *May 26, 1992Mar 30, 1993Trico Mfg. Corp.Constant depth reservoir
US6447573Sep 27, 2000Sep 10, 2002Trico Manufacturing CompanyReducing saturated relative humidity of a lubricant; first agitating,introducing dry air into the enclosed space
US6932856Jul 17, 2002Aug 23, 2005Trico Mfg. Corp.Apparatus and method for lubricant condition control and monitoring from a remote location
US7140468Aug 27, 2003Nov 28, 2006Trico Mfg. Corp.Apparatus and method for lubricant condition control and monitoring
US7862875Jul 13, 2007Jan 4, 2011Trico CorporationFlinger disc
US8096164Jan 16, 2009Jan 17, 2012Trico CorporationApparatus and methods for management of fluid condition
US8147683Jan 22, 2010Apr 3, 2012Trico CorporationPortable lubricant filtration system and method
US8147684Mar 24, 2010Apr 3, 2012Trico CorporationApparatus and methods for lubricant filtration and drum pump filtration system
US8220671Jun 3, 2008Jul 17, 2012Trico CorporationLubricant dispenser with nozzle
US8313091Apr 3, 2009Nov 20, 2012Honda Motor Co., Ltd.Multi-fuel carburetors and related methods
EP0034534A1 *Feb 11, 1981Aug 26, 1981Maurice-André TacquetDevice for feeding fuel and controlling the viscosity of that fuel
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/448, 123/575, 137/398, 137/91, 261/70, 137/391, 261/18.3, 137/467.5
International ClassificationF23R3/28, F02M13/06
Cooperative ClassificationF23R3/28, F02M13/06
European ClassificationF23R3/28, F02M13/06