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Publication numberUS2930486 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 29, 1960
Filing dateDec 16, 1957
Priority dateDec 16, 1957
Publication numberUS 2930486 A, US 2930486A, US-A-2930486, US2930486 A, US2930486A
InventorsHoover John W
Original AssigneeFibreboard Paper Products Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Storage and display racks
US 2930486 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 29, 1960 J. w. HOOVER 2,939,486

STORAGE AND DISPLAY RACKS Filed Dec. 16, 1957 s Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. JOHN W HOOVER A TTOPNEYS March 29, 1960 J. w. HOOVER 2,930,486

F/G' 7 2k 2 l7-| mlm u mlm 2:38 4| V \M 4 INVENTOR. 4| JOHN W HOOVER BY I 3% r% ATTORNEYS 4 March 29, 1960 J. w. HOOVER 2,930,486

STORAGE AND DISPLAY RACKS Filed Dec. 16, 1957 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 F/GJO Illlm INVENTOR.

ATTORNVS JOHN W HOOVER spective purchasers.

TC RAGE AND DISPLAY RACKfi .l'eisn W. Hoover, Los Aitos, Calif., assignor to Fibrehoard Paper Products Corporation, San Francisco, Caiii, a corporation of Deiaware Applieation December 16, 1957, Serial No. 703,006

13 Claims. (Cl- Ill-=44) The present invention relates to storage and display racks which may be utilized individually or connected in groups and arranged in various configurations for displaying a plurality of elongated objects. More particularly this invention relates to merchandising racks which are adapted to be positioned in various readily attachable and detachable display assemblies in a show room or store and in which a supply of rolled flexible floor coverings, such as felt-base hard-surface linoleum rugs or the like, may be displayed in an upright position for ready access by prospective customers.

The present invention also relates to connecting and display means for racks of this invention which performs the dual function of drawing attention to the objects displayed in the rack assemblies as well as securing adjacent racks together in various display arrangements. The connecting and display means desirably includes advertising legends or the like which attract the attention of prospective buyers and add color to the rack display.

it frequently is the present practice for floor covering merchandisers to store rolled rugs of the linoleum type on the fioor of a show room or storage room. Because the rugs to be sold generally are produced in various distinct patterns and colors, a large quantity of such rolled rugs normally must be kept on hand by the merchandiser to satisfy the wants of the buying public. When such rugs are stored in roll form on the floor, a lar e quantity of fioor space is utilized in that such rug rolls frequently are 12 feet or more in length. in addition, when a quantity of rugs are laid on the show room floor, it is extremely difficult for prospective buyers to acquaint themselves with the patterns of the various rugs. The prospective buyers, as a result, have difiiculty in choosing a rug to their liking.

Generally individual linoleum rugs are encased in separate elongated tubes of paperboard or the like which protect the rugs from damage. One or both ends of the protective tubes frequently are open, however, and it is possible to withdraw a rug from an associated tube to ascertain the pattern and color thereof. Withdrawing of a rug from the protective tube often results in rug damage. To preclude rug damage, a display card which indicates the pattern and color of the encased rug may be positioned on each protective tube thereby precluding the need for removal of the protective tube by a prospective buyer attempting to determine the pattern and color of the rug in the tube. However, when a supply of rugs are laid on the floor, such display cards cannot readily be seen and the purpose of the cards is thereby defeated to a large extent.

One object of the present invention is the provision of rug display racks which may be used individually or in various groupings to display and store a plurality of rolled linoleum type rugs, which are encased in protective paperboard tubes, in upright position for ready access by pro- Such racks maintain the rolled rug supply upright so that a display card on each protective tube, which indicates the color and pattern of the rug V Patented Mar. 29,1960

therein, is accessible for consideration by the buying public.

The objects of the present invention also include the provision of racks which prevent damage to individual I rugs, which frequently results when a supply of rugs are indiscriminately stacked one on the other on a floor, while at the same time releasing a large quantity of floor space which heretofore frequently was used in displaying or storing a supply of rugs on the floor.

Further objects of the invention include the provision of storage and display racks which are relatively inexpensive to manufacture from readily available materials; which are provided with oblique extensions which adapt a plurality of racks for grouping in various novel arrangements to draw attention to the product displayed; which are substantially identical in construction; which are reversibe to facilitate grouping of the racks in numerous novel fashions; and which incorporate means for facilitating insertion or removal of individual rolled rugs relative to the racks while protecting the lower ends of the rolls against damage.

Referring now to the drawings which illustrate a desirable embodiment of the present invention:

Fig. l is an isometric view of a desirable embodiment of a display rack looking at the back of the rack and illustrating the open framework construction thereof.

Fig. 2 is an end view of the rack looking in the direction of arrow 2 in Fig. 1. a

Fig. 3 is a plan view of a rack secured to a wall or like structure by suitable clamping means.

' Fig. 4 is a vertical section taken in the plane of line 44 of Fig. 3 illustrating one form of clamping means by which a rack may be secured to a wall or like structure.

Fig. 5 is an isometric view of two racks embodying the present invention arranged in end to end V formation and secured to a supporting wall and extending outwardly therefrom.

Fig. 6 is a plan view illustrating a plurality of racks arranged in straight line end to end relationship and maintained against a wall or like supporting structure.

Fig. 7 is a plan view of a pluralityof racks arranged in an island type display configuration.

Fig. 8 is a paln view of the ends of two adjacent racks interconnected by fastening and display means including an advertising legend supporting staff.

Fig. 9 is a side elevation of the fastening and display means used in Fig. 8 showing an advertising legend'displayed thereon.

Fig. 10 is an isometric view of the lower section of the fastening and display means of Fig. 9 showing clamping means securedthereto.

Fig. 11 is a plan view similar to 8 which shows two racks connected by another type of fastening means. i

Fig. 12 is a sectional view taken in the plane of line 1212 of Fig. 11 showing a desirable form of fastening means. I

Fig. 13 is a plan view of two racks of the present invention connected in straight line end to end relationship.

Fig. 14 is a vertical section taken in the plane of line 14-44 of Fig. 7 illustrating fastening means for connecting adjacent ends of two racks when the racks are arranged in an island type display.

Fig. 15 is an end view of a rack illustrating schematically a desirable manner of inserting a rug thereinto.

Referring to Fig. l, the rear of a reversible storage and display rack 1 of this invention is shown which desirably comprises vertically spaced upper and lower longitudinally extending elongated frame members 2 and 2'. The longitudinal frame members 2 and 2 are substantially identical in size and shape and desirably each is in the form of an oblique angled parallelogram which desir- 3 ably takes the form of a rhomboid. The various parts of the rack framework may be produced economically and easily from numerous commercially available material but desirably'metal rod, such as plated steel rod, is used which imparts an openwork configuration to the racks.

The upper and lower longitudinal frame members 2 and 2 include vertically spaced front rails 3 and 3' re spectively and vertically spaced rear rails 4 and 4 re.- spectively. Rails 3, 3', '4 and 4' desirably are parallel to each other. Front rails 3 and 3' and rear rails 4 and 4' cooperate to provide spaced front and rear compartment forming means of the rack which cooperate with partition members, to be described, which provide a plurality of rug receiving rack compartments.

Opposite ends of the longitudinal frame members 2 and 2 form longitudinally extending projections which include longitudinal extremities or end rails 6 and -7 and e 6' and 7",;respectively. End rails 6 and 7 and 6' and 7' are inclined or oblique relative to the respective front and rear rails of the frame members but are parallel to each other. Because of the elongated configuration of the longitudinal upper and lower frame members 2 and 2 the completed rack itself has an elongated configuration, and accordingly, the end rails of the frame members 2 and 2' are substantially shorter inlength than the front and rear rails thereby imparting a rhomboid configuration to the frame members 2 and 2'.

As shown in Fig. 2, the upper and lower longitudinal frame members 2 and 2' lie in planes which are substantially parallel to each other but which are inclined relative to thehorizontal when the rack is positioned on a horizontal surface, such as a floor. 'Desirably each of the frame members 2 and 2' extends downwardly from the rear of the rack to the front of the rack, for a purpose to be set out hereinafter. That is, each, of the front rails 3 and 3' lies in a plane on a lower level than its associated rear rail 4 or 4. 1

A plurality of spaced partition members are connected with the longitudinal frame members 2 and 2 and extend transversely therebetween. The transverse partition members desirably are rectangular in configuration and extend upright between" frame members 2 and 2' and form a plurality of walls or partitions 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 16, respectively, which divide the completed rack into a plurality of separate compartments, each of which is adapted to receive and maintain a rolled linoleum rug or like object in upright position. The partition members and longitudinal frame members may be secured together in any conventional manner and desirably are welded together at their points of contact with each other thereby imparting an open framework configuration to the rack.

As best shown in Figs. 1 and 3, theopposite ends of longitudinal frame members 2 and 2' project longitudinally beyond the partitions 8 and 1d at opposite ends of the rack. These projections of the frame members terminate in the longitudinal outer extremiites or end rails mentioned previously whichextend parallel to each other but which extend obliquely relative to the end partitions.

Desirably, the projections at opposite ends of the rack are provided as integral extensions of the longitudinal frame members but, if desired, such projections may be separate elements which may be fixedly connected to the upright members of end partitions 8 and 16 in parallel, inclined relationship. Desirably, each projection, whether separate or an integral part of the longitudinal frame members, is substantially triangular in configuration to.

provide the obliquely extending mentioned previously.

' Although seven transverse partions are formed by the upright partition members in the illustrated embodiment, thereby producing six separate rug receiving compartments, any number of partitions and compartments may end rails or extremities be provided in a rack to meet a particular need. Desir- 7 ably, each of the compartments is substantially square in horizontal cross-section so that the rug. rolls are maintained in upright position without tilting. However, if

desired, each compartment may be somewhat transversely elongated in cross-section (as shown in Fig. 3) to facilitate insertion of a rug R thereinto. Desirably, however, the cross-sectional dimensions of the compartments are only slightly larger than the diameter of the rug rolls to be inserted therein.

Certain .of the transverse partitions have vertical extensions which provide legs upon which the rack is supported in an upright operative position. 'Desirably the opposite end partitions 8 and 16 and the center partition 12 are formedwith such vertical extensions both at the top and bottom of the partitions (see Figs. 1 and 2). That is, each of the partitions 8, 12 and 16 extends vertically above and below the intermediate partitions 9, 11, 13 and 14. It is upon such partition extensions that the display rack is supported on the floor or similar surface of a show room. Stated in another way, each of the end partitions 8 and 16 and middle partition 12 is longer in a vertical direction than the remaining partitions of the rack so that the intermediate partitions 9, i1, 13 and 14- do not contact the rack supporting surface when the rack is in operative position.

Desirably all but end partitions 9 and 16 include compartment separating means in the form of two laterally spaced parallel transverse upright partition members which cooperate to provide a two piece partition. Each of the upright partition members desirably is formed from bendable metal rod such as that used in producing longitudinal frame members 2 and 2'. Each partition member possesses a substantially rectangular configuration which has elongated vertically extending parallel front and rear sections, which are connected to frame members 2 and 2', I

. separating means of the type described, each rug, because of the small diameter of metal rod used to form the par tition members, normally would be positioned very close to the rug in the adjacent compartment. When a rack is filled with rugs, it would be extremely ditficult toremove an individual rug from the respective compartments of the rack because of the proximity of the rug to be re moved with adjacent: rugs.

By providing each of the intermediate partitions 9, 11,

12, 13 and 14 with two spaced upright partition members,

a clearance spaceis formed between adjacent compartments (see Fig. 3) which provides adequate finger or hand room to facilitate removal of an individual rug R from a filled rack. As a result, hands may be inserted on diametrically opposite sides of a rolled rug R and the rug may be easily grasped for removal from the rack. The spacing of adjacent compartments also facilitates insertion of rugs into the rack.

' The upright partition members of end partitions 8 and 16 and center partition 12 each desirably is provided with a vertically extending guide rod member, designated 3C, ltiC and 12C respectively, which extends upright between the short top and bottom transverse sections of the. rectangular partition members. rods 3C, 12C and 16C imparts additional strength to the partitions which form the legs of the rack and also serves as a means to facilitate insertion of the rugs into the rack and to preclude distortion or damage to the bottom ends of the rug rolls. Because of the two piece construction of center partition 12, a guide rod 12C is provided in each dle partition 12 form supporting legs which contact the Each of the guide surface uponwhich the rack rests. Because the rack desirably is bottomless, if the person handling the rug rolls is not careful, rug rolls which are inserted in the compartments formed by such partitions may be placed with their bottom ends partly resting on the bottom transverse rod sections of the partitions rather than entirely upon the flat floor surface which supports the rack as is intended. That is, in the absence of the vertical guide rods 8C, 12C and 16C, if a rug roll were tilted longitudinally of the rack during insertion into a compartment formed by either of the partitions 8, 12 or 16, it would be possible for the rug roll to rest partly on the floor and partly on one of the transverse horizontal bottom sections 8D, 12D or 16D which form part of the vertical bottom extension of partitions 8, 12 and 16.

In such case the end of the rug might be torn or deformed due to the weight of the rug resting on the tilted end. The upright guide rods 8C, 12C and 16C eliminate the possibility of a rug resting on any one of the bottom transverse rod sections 8D, 121) or 16D of the partition leg extensions. As a result, each rug rests on a fiat surface and all the weight of the rug is supported by the longitudinal frame members 2 and 2 desirably is lower than the corresponding rear rail of the frame members. By positioning the upper front rail 3 in a lower plane than the upper rear rail 4, it is possible for an elongated rolled linoleum rug to be inclined or tilted relative to the rack during insertion of the rug into the rack. As a result, less head room is required to allow along rug roll to be placed into the rack; that is, less clearance is required between the top of the rack and the room ceiling than would be required if the front and rear rails of the upper longitudinal frame member were positioned in the same horizontal plane. Because rugs displayed in racks of the present invention frequently are quite long, rack structure which allows tilting isdesirable to facilitate insertion of rugs into the rack. The manner of inserting a rolled rug into a rack compartment by inclining the rug roll relative to the rack is schematically shown in Fig. 15.

Because the vertical extensions of end partitions 8 and 16 and middle partition 12 protrude both above and below the adjacent intermediate partitions 9, 11, 13 and 14, racks of this invention are reversible thereby allowing them to be positioned in various display arrangements. The oblique end projections and the bottomless construction of the rack make reversing and rearrangement of a rack possible so that such rack may be connected in various end to end display groupings with other racks.

For example, if the rack shown in Fig. 1 is rotated 180 about an axis extending longitudinally of the rack, the rack then would be resting on the extensions of partitions 8, 12 and 1-6 which originally were the top extensionspthat is, the extensions which are opposite bottom extensions which include transverse sections 8D, 12D and 1613. However, the rear of the rack would still be facing the viewer because longitudinal rail 3' would occupy the position occupied by longitudinal rail 4 as viewed in Fig. 1. Also, as a result of the reversal, the oblique projections on the rack ends would extend in a direction positions merely by rotating it about its vertical or longitudinal axis. The reversible characteristics of the racks of this invention are particularly desirable when the racks are used in the various display arrangements to be discussed hereinafter.

Because of the elongated, relatively narrow nature of each of the racks, it generally is desirable to fasten the same to the floor or wall of a show room to prevent the weight of the elongated rolled rugs R from toppling the rack over when the rack is filled. Figs. 3 and 4 illustrate one manner in which a single rack may be secured to the wall of a show room. The rack may be maintained in place by any conventional fastening means, but desirably an apertured plate 17 having a hook shaped end 18 which fits around the rear rail 4 of the upper longitudinal frame member 2 is used. Plate 17 is secured to the wall by a wood screw 19. A plurality of similar plates may be spaced along the length of the rack and engaged with upper and lower rear rails 4 and 4'.

It frequently is desirable to space the rack from the wall of a room rather than against the wall to provide clearance space for the end of the inclined rug roll and to facilitate insertion of the roll into the rack. This is so because the rack open framework makes it possible to incline the roll to a substantial angle relative to the vertical and to extend the end thereof between rear rails 4 and 4 and beyond the back surfaces thereof before the roll is positioned vertically. 1

Clamping fasteners of the type shown in Fig. 4 may be used to secure the extensions of partitions 8, 12 or 16 to the floor of the room when the rack is spaced from the wall.

In accordance with the invention, a plurality of racks may be arranged in various novel display assemblies to maintain a large number of rugs in easily accessible position.

Fig. 5 illustratesa desirable display grouping which includes two racks arranged in a substantially V-shaped end to end arrangement with the oblique end rails of cooperatively arranged longitudinal projections of the longitudinal frame members 2 and 2' connected together in parallel relationship. If desired, several pairs of racks could be arranged in the V-shaped manner shown in Fig. 5 thereby providing a saw-tooth display grouping. The projections opposite the parallel mating ends of the racks desirably are secured to a supporting wall in any convenient manner, such as by fastening means of the type shown in Fig. 4, to impart stability to the display. To position two racks so that the inclined end rails of the adjacent projecting ends are parallel and downwardly inclined as shown in Fig. 5, it is necessary to manipulate the reversible racks in the manner described previously until such end rails are parallel so that they may be fastened together.

When the racks are positioned in the V-shaped display shown, the racks are connected against separation. De-

sirably the novel and useful connecting and display means illustrated in Fig. 9 is used to secure together the cooperating oblique extremities or end rails of adjacent racks in the display grouping.

The connecting and display means shown in Figs. 9 and l0 desirably comprises an upright staff 21 which is formed from sturdy, yet bendable, metal rod.v Staff 21 includes an angular upper section 22 which extends substantially normal thereto and which has a tip 23 extending upright from the end thereof. Positioned on the upper section 22 and maintained thereon by tip 23 is display means, desirably in the form of a flag member 24, on which may be printed various advertising legends which designate the maker, price and like matter for the rugs positioned in the rack.

Extending from the bottom end of staff 21 and desirably extending at an obtuse angle relative thereto is a lower section 26 which includes clamping means for securing the advertising stalf to adjacent display racks as shown in Fig. Desirably, the angle of inclination of 3' lower extremity 26 relative to staff 21 corresponds substantially to the angle of inclination of longitudinal frame members 2 and 2 of the racks relative tothe horizontal when the racks are supported on a horizontal surface. As aresult, staff 21 is Substantially vertical and parallel to the supply of rugs R positioned in the racks (see Fig. 5). Extending between the end of the lower section 26 and the flag staff 21 is a reinforcing rod member 27 which imparts rigidity to the staff. Flag staii 21, upper and lower sections 22 and 26, and reinforcing rod 27 may be formed from a single rod bent to the configurati shown or from several rod sections connected together by welding or brazing.

Desirably, the clamping means secured to the lower section 26 of the flag staii includes two spaced clamping plates 29 secured thereto by any conventional means, such as welding or brazing. Each clamping plate has a spaced intermediate curved section or channel 3t} positioned on each side of a flat central plate section 31. Flat section 31 of each plate is connected to lower section 26 of staif 21 by welding or brazing. Laterally extending iiat end sections 32 of each plate 29 have holes 33 provided therein. Clamping plates 29 are intended to engage with hat plates 34 adapted to underlie (see Fig. 9) the bottom surfaces of cooperatively arranged projection extremities of adjacent racks and maintain the same connected. 1

Each of the fiat plates 34 has transverse holes therethrough alignable with the holes 33 in clamping plates 2). The curved channels 30 of the clamping plates 29 engage the top portions of adjacent projection extremities of the parallelogram shaped rack frame members with flat plates 34 positioned on the under side of each of such projection extremities. Bolts 36 pass through the aligned openings in plates 29 and 3d (see Fig. 9) and nuts 37 are threaded thereon to retain the adjacent racks in end to end substantially contacting relationship as shown in Fig. 5.

Desirably, the bottom longitudinal frame members 2' of adjacent racks positioned in a V-shaped display also are secured together and clamps of the type shown in Figs. 11 and 12 or in Fig. 14 may be used for that purpose. The clamps of Fig. 14 will be described later. The

clamps of Figs. 11 and 12 include a centrally apertured upper plate 38 having parallel channels 39 spaced on each side of the aperture and a fiat centrally apertured lower plate 4%. Channels 39 are positioned over the end rails or extremities of adjacent lower frame members and fiat plate 40 is positioned against the bottom of the end rails and maintained in place by a bolt 36 maintained in the aligned holes of plates 39 and at) by nut 37. If desired, the clamps of Figs. 11 and 12 could be used to fasten adjacent upper frame members in place of the flag stafi connecting and display means described previously.

Fig. 8 shows a modification of a V-shaped display arrangement which is adapted to be positioned in the corner of a room or the like. In such case, a fastening means of the flag staff type or other fastening means may be used.

Because of the oblique projecting ends provided, adjacent racks may be fitted flush in the corner thereby presenting a neat display appearance while filling the corner and precluding any waste of corner space. If the adjacent racks Were not provided with the oblique projections shown, an unbalanced corner display would result which would require more corner space and present a less neat appearance. However, as described previously, on occasion it is desirable to space the racks from the walls to provide a clearance space to facilitate insertion of rugs. If desired, the racks of the V-shaped display similarly may be spaced from the respective converging walls which form the room corner. When racks are to be connected for positioning in a corner manipulation or reversal of adjacent racks is necessary to bring adjacent end rails into proper parallel relationship to allow connection of the racks by appropriate fastening means.

8 "Another display arrangement is shown in Figs. 6 and 13 in which a plurality of racks are maintained in straight line end to end relationship. In such arrangement, adjacent racks may be secured together with clamps of the type shown in Figs. 11 and 12 or by flag staff display means of the type shown in Fig. 9. If flag staff connecting means are utilized, the upper section 22 thereof may be twistedso that it extends at substantially right angles to the longitudinal axis of the aligned racks, as shown in Fig. 6. The flag staff 21 is formed from sturdy metal rod but such a rod also is deformable to allow twisting thereof if it is so desired.

The oblique arrangement of the end rails or extremities of the'rack projections and the reversible characteristics of the racks also. are desirable when the racks are to be used in a straight line arrangement of Fig. 6. Because the racks are each reversible and usable in several positions relative to a reference surface, the rack oblique projections may be matched for connection together by manipulating or reversing the adjacent racks until the extremities are parallel and positioned properly for securing together. To preclude tipping of the display assembly, fastening means of the type shown in Fig. 4 may be used to secure the racks directly to the wall or to the floor at a location spaced from the wall.

Another embodiment of a display arrangement which may be utilized involves the positioning of four display racks in the arrangement shown in Fig. 7. Such arrangement consists of a substantially diamond shaped island type formation in which oblique extremities of two adjacent racks are secured in substantially contacting parallel relationship while the other contacting ends of theracks are secured in substantially limited contact by fastening means desirably in the form of interfitting clamps of the type shown in Fig. 14.

Each of the clamps comprises a U-shaped member 41, the arms of which have aligned holes therethrough. Bolt 42. desirably extends through the aligned holes of the interfitted clamping members 41 when positioned as shown in Fig. 14 and such bolt is maintained in place by nut 43. When an island display of the type shown in Fig. 7 is provided, it generally is unnecessary to fasten the racks to the fioor or walls of the room in that the island construction itself possesses sufficient stability to preclude toppling of the display when a large number of rugs are positioned in the racks. If desired, flag staff connecting means of the type described previously may be utilized to connect the parallel extremities of adjacent For purposes of illustration, the opposite obliquely extending extremities of the projecting ends of the parallelogram shaped longitudinal frame members 2' and 2 of each of the racks are shown extending at substantially a 45 angle relative to the longitudinal axis of the rack and to the end partitions 8 and 16. This enables positioning of adjacent racks in end to end relationship to form a right angle therebetween whereby the racks may be positioned flush in a corner or spaced from the walls forming the cornerin the manner described previously.

The angle at which the end rails extendyhowevcr, is not critical and may be varied as desired to meet a particular need. For example, with respect to the display arrangement shown in Fig. 5, less floor space would be utilized in such display arrangement if the angle of the oblique end rails of the adjacent racks is substantially less than 45. That is, if such angle is of the order of 30, the racks forming the legs of the V-shaped display may be brought more closely together. When the angle of the oblique end rails is less than 45, the racks of the V-shaped display form anacute angle while an obtuse angle is formed it the angle of the oblique end rails is greater than 45.

The foregoing description discloses one desirable embodiment of a rug display rack of this invention as well as several desirable display arrangements in which the rack may be utilized. Other display arrangements and other structural modifications for the rug display racks may become apparent to one skilled in the art and as a result this invention should be interpreted in light of the appended claims. Furthermore, other materials may be used to produce the racks without departing from the spirit of this invention and other floor coverings, such as carpets and the like, and other elongated objects may be displayed in racks embodying this invention.

I claim:

1. A portable and readily attachable and detachable display rack assembly for maintaining elongated rolled rugs or the like in upright position comprising a plurality of racks each of which is usable independently of the others arranged in end to end relationship; each of said racks comprising longitudinally extending spaced front and rear compartment forming means, a plurality of partition members extending transversely of said comparatment forming means and rigidly connected therebetween and dividing said rack into a plurality of separate upright compartments, and projections extending longitudinally beyond the partition members at opposite ends of said rack, the longitudinal outer extremities of said projections extending substantially parallel to each other and obliquely relative to said end partition members; said racks being arranged in one of various predetermined display groupings with adjacent oblique extremities of adjacent racks being cooperatively positioned in substantially parallel relationship; and removable connecting means engaging such cooperatively arranged projections of adjacent racks to preclude inadvertent separation thereof, whereby said racks may be maintained in said one display grouping for displaying said rugs.

2. A portable and readily attachable and detachable display rack assembly for elongated rolled rugs or the like comprising a plurality of substantially identical reversible open framework racks arranged in end to end relationship; each of said racks comprising vertically spaced longitudinally extending oblique angled parallelogram shaped frame members, a plurality of upright members rigidly interconnected with said frame members and extending transversely therebetween, said upright members providing partitions which divide the rack into a plurality of separate upright compartments each of which is adapted to receive a rolled rug to maintain the same in upright position, the ends of said parallelogram shaped frame members projecting beyond the partitions at opposite ends of said rack with the outermost extremities of said ends extending obliquely relative to said partition; said racks being arranged in one of various predetermined display groupings with adjacent oblique extremities thereof cooperatively positioned in substantially parallel relationship; and removable connecting means engaging adjacent cooperatively arranged extremities of adjacent racks to preclude separation thereof whereby said racks may be maintained in said one display grouping for displaying said rugs.

3. A reversible, multi-position storage and display rack for rolled rugs 'or like objects comprising an open framework rack body defined substantially entirely by metal rods, said body comprising a pair of upper and lower longitudinally extending frame members of substantially equal size each of which is in the shape of an oblique angle parallelogram, a plurality of substantially rectangular partition members extending transversely of said frame members and rigidly secured thereto whereby said rack is divided into a plurality of separate rug receiving compartments each of which has a substantially square longitudinal cross section, certain of said partitions including extensions providing legs for supporting said rack on a horizontal surface whereby said compartments may extend substantially vertically, said longitudinal frame members being substantially parallel to each other and being inclined downwardly toward the front of the rack relative to the horizontal when the rack is supported on such surface whereby rug insertion is facilitated, the ends of said frame members extending beyond the partition members at opposite ends of said racks whereby two spaced generally triangular, inclined projections are provided at each rack end, said rack being adapted to be connected to another similar rack in a display grouping by arranging said rack relative to said other rack so that the projections at adjacent ends of such racks are inclined in the same direction with the outer extremities of such projections positioned substantially parallel to each other.

4. An assembly comprising a plurality of attachable and detachable rug or the like display racks connected together in end-to-end relationship and providing a display rack grouping; each of said racks comprising pairs of longitudinally extending spaced front and rear compartment forming members, a plurality of partition members extending transversely of said compartment forming members and secured therebetween whereby said rack is divided into a plurality of separate compartments, each of said front compartment forming members lying in a plane below and parallel to the plane of its associated rear compartment forming member when the rack is supported on a horizontal surface with said compartments extending vertically whereby insertion of rugs into the rack is facilitated and said rack is imparted with a reversible character, said compartment forming members including continuations thereof which extend longitudinally beyond the partition members at opposite ends of the rack and provide generally triangular projections, the outer extremities of said projections extending substantially parallel to each other and oliquely relative to said end partition members, said projections being inclined relative to the horizontal when the rack is sup ported on a horizontal surface; said plurality of racks being arranged in one of various predetermined display groupings with adjacent oblique extremities of adjacent racks being cooperatively positioned in substantially parallel similarly inclined relationship; and connecting means engaging such cooperatively arranged projections to preclude inadvertent separation thereof whereby said racks are maintained in said one display grouping.

5. The rack assembly of claim 4 wherein the number of racks in said display grouping is at least two and wherein said racks are secured together in a substantially V-shaped arrangement.

6. The rack assembly of claim 4 wherein the number of racks in said display grouping is at least two and wherein said racks are secured together in a substantially straight line arrangement.

7. The rack assembly of claim 4 whereinthe number of racks in said display grouping is four and wherein said racks are secured together in a substantially diamond shaped arrangement.

8. A display rack for rolled rugs or like objects comprising an open framework rigid rack body defined substantially entirely by metal rods, said body comprising pairs of longitudinally extending spaced front and rear compartment forming members, and a plurality of partition members extending transversely of said compartment forming members and rigidly secured therebetween whereby said rack is divided into a plurality of separate compartments, each of said front compartment forming members lying in a plane below and parallel to the plane of its associated rear compartment forming member when said rack is supported on a horizontal surface whereby insertion of rugs into said compartments from the front of the rack is facilitate-d, certain of said partition members including upper and lower extensions above and below said compartment forming members whereby supporting legs are provided, said rack being reversible and positionable on either said upper or said lower extensions agascnse 1 1 whereby rugs maybe inserted-vertically into said compartmentsirrespective ofthe position of said rack.

9. An elongated reversible open framework storage and display rack for rolled rugs or like objects-comprisingvertically spaced elongated longitudinal frame memhers, each of said longitudinal frame members being substantially in the-shape of an oblique angled parallelogram; aplurality-of partitions extending transversely of said longitudinal frame members and dividing said rack into a plurality of separate-compartments; certain of said partitions each comprising two substantially parallel upright members which are spaced from each other, such partition members separating adjacent compartments of said rack and providing finger room vtherebetween to facilitate insertion of objects into and removal of objects from suchadjacent compartments; the ends of said longitudinal frame members-projecting beyondpartitions at pposite ends of said rack and terminating in extremities which extend obliquely relative to such end partitions, whereby said rack may. be cooperatively connected in end to end relationship in various display groupings with other similar racks,

10. A multi-position, reversible metal rod storage and display rack for maintaining elongated objects in anupright position, comprising longitudinally extending spaced front; and rearcompartment forming members, a plurality of partitions extending transversely of said members and spacedly located therealong and fixedly secured thereto whereby a plurality of separate object receiving compartments are provided in said rack, and means projecting longitudinally from opposite ends of said rack whereby said rack may be matingly engaged with another similar rack in a predetermined one of many display groupings; said means comprising at least one projection extending from each of said rack opposite ends, each of said projections including a longitudinal outer extremity which extends obliquely relative to said partitions; the outer extremities of said projections being sec'urabl'e in substantially parallel relationship with an outer extremity of another similar rack when such racks are employed in such predetermined display grouping.

11. The storage and display rackof claim 10 in which a pairof vertically spaced projections extend longitudinally from each of said rack ends, each of said projections being inclined relative to the horizontal when the rack is arranged in operative position with said partitions extending generally vertically.

12. A multi-position reversible metal rod storage and display rack for rolled rugs and like elongated objects comprising vertically spaced elongated longitudinally extending frame members, and a plurality of upright partitions extending transversely of said longitudinal frame members and fixedly secured thereto and dividing said rack into a plurality of separate object receiving compartments; certain of said partitions each comprising two longitudinally spaced partition forming members which extend generally parallel to each other, such partition forming members separating certain adjacent compartments of said rack from each other by a predetermined distance and providing finger room therebetween to facilitate insertion of objects into and removal of objects from such adjacent compartments; at least some of said partitions providing legs for supporting said rack in the operative position on a generally horizontal supporting surface.

13. The storage and display rack of claim 12 in which each of said last mentioned leg providing partitions includes an intermediate guide rod extending upright between said rack longitudinal frame members for precluding tilting of objects positioned in the compartment defined thereby.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 366,051 Weatherley July 5, 1887 454,328 Buchholz June 16, 1891 902,361 Yell Oct. 27, 1908 1,995,574 Metz Mar. 26, 1935 2,222,190 Wolf Nov. 19, 1940

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Referenced by
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US3083836 *Feb 1, 1962Apr 2, 1963Louis GriffFreezer rack
US3104778 *Jan 12, 1961Sep 24, 1963 Wire holder and dispenser assembly
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US4854456 *Aug 10, 1988Aug 8, 1989Lee Juang JRack structure for balls and related equipment
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US20060108307 *Aug 11, 2005May 25, 2006Kin Henry AMerchandiser assembly
US20090078660 *Sep 30, 2008Mar 26, 2009Kin Products, Inc.Merchandiser Assembly
US20100032390 *Feb 11, 2010Kin Products, Inc.Rug display system
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/44, 211/60.1, 211/106, 211/181.1, D06/678.4
International ClassificationA47B81/00, A47F7/17, A47F7/16
Cooperative ClassificationA47F7/175, A47B81/007
European ClassificationA47B81/00E, A47F7/17B