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Publication numberUS2931058 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 5, 1960
Filing dateApr 22, 1957
Priority dateApr 22, 1957
Publication numberUS 2931058 A, US 2931058A, US-A-2931058, US2931058 A, US2931058A
InventorsCharles B Knudsen
Original AssigneeCharles B Knudsen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf ball washing machine
US 2931058 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 5, 1960 Filed April 22, 1957 C. B. KNUDSEN GOLF BALL WASHING MACHINE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR Char/es B. lfnudqen ATTORNEY April 1960 c. a. KNUDSEN 2,931,058

GOLF BALL WASHING MACHINE Filed April 22, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR Char/es B. Knudsen BY wwa ATTORNEY United rates This invention relates to an improvement in golf ball washing machine and deals particularly with an apparatus useful in washing golf balls which is capable of handling a considerable quantity of these golf balls.

Commercial organizations such as practice driving ranges are often faced with a considerable problem in keeping the golf balls washed and cleaned. In such establishments, the player who wishes to practice purchases a pail of golf balls for use and practices golf shots, driving the balls into a practice field. In many such establishments, a considerable number of people practice simultaneously and as a result, a very large number of golf balls must be available for use. While means have been provided for picking up the golf balls from the practice field while the practicing continues, it is still necessary to have available a suificient number of pails of golf balls to properly accommodate the customers. As it is often necessary to wash these balls between the time they are used by different customers, a very considerable amount of time is often employed in keeping the golf balls clean. This is particularly true if the balls are cleaned one at a time in the usual manner.

A feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a golf ball washing machine which includes a receptacle capable of supporting a large number of golf balls which is provided with an inclined bottom panel so that all of the golf balls are eventually directed to one end of the device. A wheel of large diameter is supported on an axis which is preferably inclined at an acute angle to the horizontal, the lower periphery of the wheel extending close to the bottom of the receptacle. This wheel is provided with spaced pockets near its periphery into which the golf balls may roll, each pocket preferably holding two golf balls although the number of balls contained is somewhat of a matter of choice. The pockets into which the golf balls roll extend entirely through the wheel and the wheel is of a thickness slightly less than the diameter of the golf balls. The wheel preferably rotates over an inclined end of the tank and the balls are held in the pockets by gravity.

During the rotation of the wheel, the balls pass over a resilient mat and beneath a rotating brush. These elements cooperate to wash all sides of the ball clean.

An object of the present invention resides in the provision of a ball washing apparatus which is simple in construction and inexpensive to operate and which is capable of quickly washing a great quantity of golf balls or the like.

A further feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a pocketed wheel designed to receive the golf balls and to carry them into position to be cleaned.

A further feature of the present invention resides in the provision of an apparatus of the type described embodying a resilient pad over which the balls are carried and a rotating brush engageable with the opposite surfaceof the balls. As a result, as the balls are carried over the mat, they are rotated in a manner to cleanly wash the entire surface thereof.

*- atent ice A further feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a device of the character described embodying a baflle between the body of the receptacle into which the balls are placed and the wheel which carries the ball into washing position. The baffle controls the level of the golf balls engaged by the wheel.

,A further feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a golf ball washing apparatus which includes a water tight receptacle into which the golf balls are inserted and which may be partially filled with water which may if desired contain a suitable soap or detergent. The golf balls remain immersed in the solution for a period of time prior to the actual scrubbing operation and as a result the dirt which is collected on the surface of the balls has an opportunity to soak loose when in place.

These and other objects and novel features of my invention will be more clearly and fully set forth in the following specification and claims.

In the drawings forming a part of the specification:

Figure l is a side elevational view of a golf ball washing apparatus illustrating the general arrangement of parts.

Figure 2 is a vertical sectional view centrally through the structure shown in Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a top plan view of the apparatus shown in Figures 1 and 2.

Figure 4 is a perspective view of a baffle used in guiding golf balls to the conveying wheel.

Figure 5 is a perspective view of a support used for supporting the baffle shown in Figure 4.

Figure 6 is a diagrammatic view of a portion of the drive mechanism for operating the scrubbing brush and the conveyor wheel.

The ball washing apparatus is indicated in general by the letter A and is used for washing golf balls, which are indi cated in general by the letter B. The washing machine A is capable of holding a very considerable number of golf balls, the number being determined by the width and depth of the tank or receptacle into which the golf balls are placed.

As is illustrated in the drawings, the machine A includes a rear wall it} having an outwardly directed flange 1-1 at its upper extremity and communicating at its lower edge with an inclined bottom wall 12. The lower edge of the bottom wall 12 communicates with a transversely extending channel-shaped trap 13 which includes a pair of spaced vertical walls 14 and 15, and a generally horizontal bottom wall-l6. Obviously, the bottom wall 16 may slope slightly toward a drain passage 17 which may be normally closed by a valve or by a stopper such as is used in a sink or the like.

The upper edge of the vertical wall 15 communicates with an upwardly and outwardly inclined end wall 19 which forms the end of the receptacle. The inclined wall 19 is provided at its upper edge with an angularly turned flange 20.

A pair of side walls 21 and 22 form side closures for the receptacle, these side Walls being generally trapeziform in shape. The upper edges of the side walls 21 and 2.2 and generally horizontal and are provided with outwardly turned reinforcing flanges 23 and 24 respectively.

A shaft 25 extends through the inclined wall 19 of the tank and acts to rotatably support a wheel 26. As is evident from Figure 3 of the drawings, the wheel 26 includes a solid central portion 27 which preferably presents a smooth upper surface to the golf balls, an outer peripheral rim 29, and a series of angularly spaced radially extending partition walls 30 which divide this portion of the wheel into a series of spaced pockets 31, the partitions 30 connecting the center portion 27 of the wheel with the rim 29 thereof. The body of the wheel 26 extends in substantially parallel relation to the tank wall 19 V and rotates over the surface of this wall.

A supporting structure 32, illustrated in Figures 2 and 5 of the drawings, rests in the channel-shaped trap 13. The supports 32 include a pair of supporting plates 33 of similar shape secured in parallel relation by a spacing rod 34. The upper surfaces 35 of the plates 33 are preferably curved to fit the cooperable surface of the baffle 36 illustrated in Figure 4 of the drawings.

The baffle 36 includes a panel 37 having a generally straight edge 39 designed to extend in edge abutting relation with the lower edge of the bottom panel 12. The center portion of the panel 37 is provided with a generally crescent shaped curved surface 40 which fits the curvature of the outer surface of the wheel 26. As is best shown in Figure 2, a short cylindrical band 4-1 encircles the wheel 26 and is in closely spaced relation thereto. The curved portion 40 of the battle 36 fits snugly beneath the lower portion of the hand 40 to act to guide the golf balls toward the wheel. The curved upper surfaces 35 of the plates 33 extend beneath portions of the curved surface 40 and act to support the baftie in proper relation to the wheel. Generally triangular wings 42 are provided on each side of the panel 37 which include edges 43 designed to extend against the wall 19 on either side of the wheel 26 to direct golf balls downwardly toward the center of the tank. The position of these wings is illustrated in Figures 2 and 3 of the drawings.

A baffie 44 extends downwardly into the tank, the baffle terminating in a downwardly inclined flanged edge 45 which is spaced a suitable distance above the bottom panel 12 of the tank. The bafile 44 extends between the receptacle sides 21 and 22 and is supported by a suitable cross member 46. This bafiie tends to restrict the number of the balls which may roll downwardly into the lower end of the apparatus and against the wheel.

A motor 47 having a connected gear reduction head 49 is mounted upon a suitable framework 50 adjoining the wall 19 of the receptacle. This frame 50 is supported by one or more supporting legs 51. The tank itself is also supported by spaced legs 52 and 53 which may be connected by connecting braces such as 54.,

The motor 47 drives a shaft 55 which extends through the panel 19 exteriorly of the ring shaped flange 41 encircling the Wheel 26. A circular scrubbing brush 57 having a suitable supporting backing member 59 is mounted upon the shaft 55 for rotation in unison therewith. The brushing surface 60 of the brush 57 is substantially flush with the upper surface of the wheel 26.

As is indicated in Figure 6 of the drawings, a sprocket 61 is mounted upon the motor driven shaft 55 and a cooperable sprocket 62 is mounted upon a parallel stub shaft 63 supported beneath the panel 19. The sprocket 61 is small compared to the diameter of the sprocket 62' so that when these sprockets are connected by the chain 64, the shaft 63 will be driven at a substantially slower speed than the sprocket 60. A relatively small diameter pinion 65 is mounted upon the shaft 63 and this pinion meshes with a substantially larger diameter gear 66 mounted upon the wheel shaft 65. Thus, rotation of the motor driven shaft 55 acts to drive the wheel shaft and the wheel 26 at a rate of speed materially slower than the speed of rotation of the brush 57.

An idle sprocket 67 engages the chain 64 between the sprockets 61 and 62 and this idle sprocket is mounted upon an arm 69 which is pivotally supported at 70 to the tation of the wheel so that all surfaces of the balls will be cleaned. Due to the fact that the balls are traveling upon an arcuate path, they are rotated in such a way as to clean the entire surface thereof.

The wall 19 is provided with an opening 72 extending therethrough which communicates with an inclined chute 73. This chute 73 communicates with a tubular chute section 74 which leads to trough shaped guide 75 which extends at substantially right angles thereto. The chute sections 75 may be inclined to direct the balls leaving the apparatus in one direction or another, the chute section being supported by a generally U-shaped supporting member 76 which encircles the center portion of the same.

The operation of the apparatus is believed obvious from the foregoing description. The tank is partially filled with water which may, if desired, contain a detergent or soap. The balls are placed into the tank above the bafile 44 and rolled by gravity toward the lower end of the tank and against the wheel 26. As the wheel rotates, the balls drop into the various pockets in the wheel and are carried upwardly and over the rubber mat 71. At this point, the balls are also engaged by the brush 57 which tends to hold the balls against the rubber mat causing them to rotate in a manner to expose all of the surfaces of the balls to the brush. Thus the balls which have been thoroughly Wetted prior to the scrubbing operation, are cleaned by the brush and are directed to the opening 72. The balls then pass through the outlet chute arrangement and into a suitable receptacle 77 or series of such receptacles, moving beneath the outlet portion of the chute.

It will be noted that the brush 57 overlies the wheel 26 to a considerable extent. As the balls B in the pocket 30 pass beneath this wheel, the rotation of the brush tends to roll the balls inwardly toward the axis of the wheel as they rotate between the brush and the pad 71. This, in effect, turns the balls over to eliminate any unwashed spots. As the wheel progresses, the direction of the force of the brush bristle acting upon the balls also changes; and prior to the time the balls travel completely past the brush the force imparted by the bristles tends to roll the balls outwardly away from the center of the Wheel. Thus the relation of the brush relative to the pockets is of importance.

In accordance with the patent statutes, I have described the principles of construction and operation of my golf ball washing machine, and while I have endeavored to set forth the best embodiment thereof, I desire to have it understood that changes may be made within the scope of the following claims without departing from the spirit of my invention.

I claim:

1. A golf ball washing apparatus including a tank having a bottom on which golf balls may rest, an inclined wall on said tank, a wheel rotatably supported overlying said inclined Wall and extending close to the bottom of the tank, angularly spaced pockets in said Wheel on said bottom for reciving balls contained in said tank, a brush overlying said pockets at a point spaced substantially'from the tank bottom for engaging those balls within the pockets, and means for rotating said wheel in one rotative direction to move said pockets in sequence beneath said brush, said wall having an opening therein registrable with said pockets and through which said balls may roll after engagement by said brush.

2. The construction described in claim 1 and including means rotatably supporting said brush.

3. A golf ball washing apparatus including means providing a sloping bottomand an inclined wall extending upwardly from the lower end of said slopping bottom, a wheel rotatably supported overlying said inclined wall, said wheel extending to a point adjoining the lower end of said inclined wall and cooperating with said sloping bottom, said wheel having angularly spaced pockets therein designed to accommodate golf balls directed thereto by said sloping bottom, a brush overlying said rotatable wheel and in the path of movement of golf balls in said pockets for brushing thereagainst, and means for rotating said wheel to move the balls contained in said pockets into successive engagement with said brush.

4. The construction described in claim 3 and including means rotatably supporting said brush, and means for rotating said brush upon rotation of said wheel.

5. The construction described in claim 3 and in which said inclined wall includes a discharge opening successively registrable with said pockets upon rotation of said wheel after engagement with said brush.

6. The construction described in claim 3 and including a baflle in said receptacle terminating in spaced relation to said sloping bottom and beneath which golf balls may roll by gravity down said sloping bottom.

7. A golf ball washing apparatus including a tank designed to contain a cleaning fluid and including a sloping bottom, a channel-shaped trough at the lower end of said slopping bottom and extending transversely thereof, an upwardly and outwardly inclined wall extending from said trough, a wheel rotatably supported overlying said wall, said wheel having a series of angularly spaced ball receiving pockets therein movable successively into said trough, a brush overlying a portion of said wheel at an elevation above said trough and in the path of balls engaged in said pockets, said inclined wall having an outlet opening therein through which the balls may roll after being carried by said wheel past said brush.

8. The construction described in claim 7 and including means rotatably supporting said brush, and including a resilient mat overlying said wall beneath said wheel over which said balls are carried during engagement with said brush.

9. The construction described in claim 7 and including a bathe in said trough directing balls from said sloping bottom to the surface of said wheel.

10. The construction described in claim 9 and including removable means in said trough supporting said bafile.

11. The construction described in claim 3 and in which the brush is rotatably supported above said wheel under which said balls are carried during engagement with said brush.

12. A golf ball washing apparatus including a fluid tank having a bottom for supporting golf balls and an outwardly inclined wall, a wheel rotatably supported overlying said wall and extending close to said bottom, said wheel having a series of angularly spaced ball receiving pockets therein for receiving balls contained in said tank on said bottom, a brush overlying a portion of said wheel and in the path of balls engaged in said pockets for engaging those balls within the pockets, means rotatably supporting said brush, and driving means connected to said brush and to said wheel for rotating said "brush at a relatively high speed and rotating said wheel at a relatively low speed.

13. The construction described in claim 12 and including a resilient mat overlying said wall beneath said wheel over which said balls travel during engagement with said brush.

14. The construction described in claim 12 and in which said wall includes a discharge opening registrable with said pockets and through which said balls may roll upon registry of said pockets with said opening after passing by said brush.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,531,281 Garbin Mar. 31, 1925 1,594,821 Dulligan Aug. 3, 1926 1,854,433 Warner Apr. 19, 1932 2,540,687 Netterstrom Feb. 6, 1951

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1531281 *Mar 31, 1923Mar 31, 1925William L Gilbert Clock CompanMachine for grinding the ends of arbors for the balance wheels of clocks or similar articles
US1594821 *Jan 29, 1924Aug 3, 1926Us Cartridge CoAutomatic feed device
US1854433 *Jun 2, 1930Apr 19, 1932Warner Joy MFruit washer
US2540687 *Feb 2, 1946Feb 6, 1951Netterstrom Ivan FGolf ball washer
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5331702 *Dec 24, 1992Jul 26, 1994Willsey Charles HGolf ball washing apparatus and method
US5711330 *Aug 11, 1995Jan 27, 1998S.G.D. Co., Inc.Golf ball washer with integral agitator
US5772778 *Oct 5, 1993Jun 30, 1998Baeck; Bengt Adolf EmanuelMethod and means for washing and dispensing of balls
US5794294 *Aug 19, 1996Aug 18, 1998Weidmann; Lawrence W.Apparatus for cleaning play balls
US6021537 *Jun 2, 1998Feb 8, 2000Smith; Warren K.Cleaning apparatus for washing golf clubs and golf balls
EP0264462A1 *Oct 15, 1986Apr 27, 1988Sebastian Messerschmidt GmbH & Co. SpezialmaschinenfabrikBall-cleaning apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/21.2, 15/3.15
International ClassificationA63B47/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2047/046, A63B47/04
European ClassificationA63B47/04