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Publication numberUS2932840 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 19, 1960
Filing dateMay 21, 1958
Priority dateMay 21, 1958
Publication numberUS 2932840 A, US 2932840A, US-A-2932840, US2932840 A, US2932840A
InventorsLathrop Henry T
Original AssigneeLathrop Henry T
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cleaning device
US 2932840 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

`April 19, 1950 H. T. LATHROP 2,932,840

CLEANING DEVICE Filed May 2l. 1958 111111111111111111"lll/1p'11.111111111111111"l INVENTOR: HENRY T. LATHROP United States arent O CLEANING DEVICE Henry T. Lathrop, 'Grand Rapids, Mich. Application May 21, 1958, Serial No. 736,766 2 Claims. (Cl. fc5- 136) This invention relates to the construction of cleaning devices, and has been developed primarily as` a tool for cleaning fabrics and upholstery. It has also been found useful in cleaning baseboards, walls, cupboards, and numerous other surfaces. The primary function is that of a dispenser for a liquid cleaning solution carried in a iiexible reservoir which preferably also serves as a handie. The cleaning solution is of the type capable of being foamed, and the structure of the unit is directed toward generating the necessary rate of release of the liquid and at the same time inducing the foam formation as a result of the movements made with the device.

The rate of discharge of the cleaning solution is de termined by the fact that the entire flow must take place through a permeable sponge, with the liquid being admitted to the sponge at a central point on the side opposite from that at which the cleaning operation is conducted. As the solution ows through the sponge under the to-and-fro movement of a mild scrubbing action, a foaming action is induced within the intercellular spaces of the sponge which results in presenting the completely foamed material to the open face of the sponge in contact with the fabric. It is preferable that the sponge block be surrounded by a group of bristles which add somewhat to the effectiveness of the scrubbing movement, and also provide a porous and yielding continement to the edges of the sponge block. The bristles facilitate the admission of air and yet serve to support the movements of the sponge material. The several features of the invention will be analyzed in detail through a discussion of the particular embodiments illustrated in the accompanying drawing. In the drawing:

Figure 1 presents a side elevation of a device showing its position when in use.

Figure 2 is a sectional elevation taken through the central portion of the unit on a vertical plane.

Figure 3 is a section through the unit on a vertical plane perpendicular to that of Figure 2.

Figure 4 is a section of the plane IV-IV of Figure 3.

Figure 5 is a view on an enlarged scale showing the perforation of the adhesive film attaching the sponge to the backing member.

Referring to the drawing, the cleaning unit is shown in its operating position being manipulated by the hand indicated in dotted lines. The reservoir 11 is preferably of a molded plastic material having considerable tlexibility, and is commonly known as a squeeze bottle. There are several well-known materials for such containers, with the specific physical characteristics of the plastic material being selected to avoid any reaction with the contained cleaning solution. The end of the container 11 is normally in threaded engagement with the opening 12 in the housing 13, and a tight threaded engagement will be suicient to establish a liquid seal. The housing 13 is preferably of die-cast construction, and provides a conduit 14 normally communicating with the container 11 and also with the chamber 15 established by the wall 16 in engagement with and extending below 2,932,840 Patented Apr. 19, 1960 ICC the inner surface of the backing member 17 of the brush unit. The chamber 15 includes the perforations 18 and 19 which are disposed in the central area of the unit opposite the cellular porous sponge block 20. The ma terial of the sponge block is preferably of the type referred to as semi-open cellular polyurethane. The backing member 17 may be conveniently formed of the conventional molded plastic material, and is normally fixed with respect to the housing 13 through being pressed firmly into engagement with the surrounding llange 21 which serves as a retaining frame. The backing member 17 has a peripheral ridge 22 for receiving a row of groups of bristles 23 surrounding the sponge block 20. It is preferable that the length of the bristles should be selected to extend slightly beyond the thickness of the sponge block for the best cleaning action. This system tends to provide a support for the sponge so that the bearing action of the scrubbing movement is not can ried exclusively by it, with the net result that a small space normally exists under the sponge for facilitating the foam formation and dispensing. With the arrangement of the bristles shown in the drawing, a flexible retaining wall is established by them extending over the full length of the side of the sponge block for admission of the air necessary to foam formation, :and for establshing a resilient confinement tending to permit the necessary pulsations of the sponge block and yet provide some degree of structural support.

The most convenient manner of attaching the sponge block 2i) to the backing member 17 is through the use of a layer of adhesive as shown at 24. Unless precautions are taken, however, this adhesive will serve to seal olf the perforations 18 and 19 so as to prevent the necessary ilow of cleaning solution into the s ponge. As a subsequent operation after the application of the ad hesive, and before assembling the brush unit to the housing, it is necessary to punch out the material forming the adhesive layer which would otherwise cover over these perforations. Figure 5 illustrates this formation, with the area indicated at 25 being poked through with some convenient instrument to permit the flow of liquid.

The particular embodiments of the present invention which have been illustrated and discussed herein are for illustrative purposes only and are not to be considered as a limitation upon the scope of the appended claims. ln these claims, it is my intent to claim the entire invention disclosed herein, except as I am limited by the prior art.

I claim:

l. A cleaning device, comprising: a housing; reservoir means of flexible material normally connected to said housing and having a configuration to form a handle thereon; a brush unit including a relatively rigid backing member having one surface formed with a peripheral rim extending thereabove and normally fixed with respect to said housing, said backing member having perforations exclusively in the central area thereof, said brush unit also including a rectangular cellular body having communicating cells capable of transmitting liquid therethrough, and adhesively secured to another sur face of said backing member opposite said perforations and communicating therewith, said brush unit also including a group of bristles projecting from said rim and arranged around said cellular body and extending along the sides thereof and having a free length exceeding the thickness of said cellular body; wall means in said housing extending below said one surface and forming with said backing member a chamber surrounding said perforations; and means forming a conduit communicating with said chamber and with said reservoir.

2. A cleaning device, comprising: a housing; reservoir means of flexible material normally connected to said thereon; a brush unit including a backing member hav- Y ing one surface formed with, a peripheral rim extending th'ereabove and normally fixed with respect to said housing, said backing member having perforationsl exclusively in the central area thereof, said brush unit also including a cellular body having communicating cells capable of transmitting liquid therethrough, and adhesively secured to another surface of said backing' member opposite said perforatons and communicating therewith, 10

said brush unit also including a group of bristles pro jecting from said rim and arranged around said cellular body and extending along the sides thereof and having a free length exceeding the thickness of said cellular body; wall means in said housing extending below 'said 15 4 one surface and forming with said backing member a chamber surrounding said perforations; 'and means form-4 ing a conduit communicating with` said chamber and with said reservoir.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,567,764 Davies Sept. l1, 1951 2,617,431 Gaspari Nov. 11, 1952 2,820,234 Rigney Ian. 21, 1958 FOREIGN PATENTS 334,314 Great Britain Sept. 4, 1930 775,900 Great Britain May 29, 1957

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2567764 *Apr 10, 1947Sep 11, 1951Davies Arthur BApplicator head for fountain brushes
US2617431 *Jan 29, 1951Nov 11, 1952Joseph GaspariHair-treating implement
US2820234 *Sep 13, 1954Jan 21, 1958Rigney Robert MHand washing tool for dishes, mirrors and the like
GB334314A * Title not available
GB775900A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3056997 *Mar 23, 1960Oct 9, 1962Blake Cummings Mfg CoDishwashing brush
US3070826 *Mar 14, 1960Jan 1, 1963Sam PaternoFountain scrubbing assembly
US3101506 *Jun 2, 1960Aug 27, 1963Wagner E R Mfg CoSqueezable-handle cleaning device having brush-sponge head
US3181196 *Mar 4, 1963May 4, 1965Lever Brothers LtdHandle operated foam generator and applicator
US3184781 *Feb 4, 1963May 25, 1965Bissell IncAerosol upholstery shampooer
US3256549 *Apr 1, 1964Jun 21, 1966Seaquist Valve CoApplicator-scrubber
US3458263 *Sep 7, 1967Jul 29, 1969Bissell IncShampooer
US3733638 *May 24, 1971May 22, 1973H & G Ind IncPaint brush construction
US5033898 *Apr 23, 1990Jul 23, 1991Williams Curtis CToothbrush with sponge flow control
US5443321 *Jan 6, 1995Aug 22, 1995Dolan; Michael J.Dispensing brush head
US5588176 *Jun 12, 1995Dec 31, 1996Thomas G. SixsmithWater recovery wash brush
US6422778Jan 12, 2001Jul 23, 20023M Innovative Properties CompanySurgical prep solution applicator system and methods
US6672784Apr 16, 2002Jan 6, 20043M Innovative Properties CompanySurgical prep solution applicator system and methods
US7090422Dec 5, 2003Aug 15, 20063M Innovative Properties CompanySurgical prep solution applicator system and methods
US7377710Aug 15, 2006May 27, 20083M Innovative Properties CoSurgical prep solution applicator system and methods
US8664455Jul 30, 2009Mar 4, 2014Honeywell International Inc.Process to manufacture 2-chloro-1,1,1,2-tetrafluoropropane (HCFC-244bb)
US8952208Jun 28, 2010Feb 10, 2015Honeywell International Inc.Method for prolonging a catalyst's life during hydrofluorination
US20040114988 *Dec 5, 2003Jun 17, 20043M Innovative Properties CompanySurgical prep solution applicator system and methods
US20070020029 *Aug 15, 2006Jan 25, 20073M Innovative Properties CompanySurgical prep solution applicator system and methods
US20080267689 *Apr 27, 2007Oct 30, 2008Soller Douglas ALiquid applicator
US20100036179 *Jul 30, 2009Feb 11, 2010Merkel Daniel CPROCESS TO MANUFACTURE 2-CHLORO-1,1,1,2-TETRAFLUOROPROPANE (HCFC-244bb)
US20100299854 *Jul 7, 2008Dec 2, 2010Ignacio Fernandez GonzalezHydro-wash-aspirator
US20100331583 *Jun 28, 2010Dec 30, 2010Honeywell International Inc.Method for prolonging a catalyst's life during hydrofluorination
US20120110765 *Nov 8, 2010May 10, 2012Mony Industrial Co., Ltd.Cleaning brush
DE2729577A1 *Jun 28, 1977Jan 12, 1978Colgate Palmolive CoVerfahren zur fleckentfernung und hierfuer geeignete vorrichtung
EP0154231A2 *Feb 15, 1985Sep 11, 1985Georg Karl Geka-Brush GmbhApplicator for liquid, pasty and powdery products, in particular for cosmetic products
EP0154231A3 *Feb 15, 1985Oct 8, 1986Georg Karl Geka-Brush GmbhApplicator for liquid, pasty and powdery products, in particular for cosmetic products
Classifications
U.S. Classification401/22, 15/114, 401/183, 401/207
International ClassificationA47L13/20, A46B11/00, A47L13/00, A47L25/00, A47L13/22, A47L13/30, A46B9/00, A47L13/10, A47L25/08, A46B9/06, A47L13/26
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/22, A47L13/30, A47L13/00, A46B11/0041, A46B9/06, A47L25/08, A47L13/26
European ClassificationA46B9/06, A47L13/30, A46B11/00C6C, A47L13/26, A47L13/22, A47L13/00, A47L25/08