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Publication numberUS2934066 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 26, 1960
Filing dateMay 12, 1958
Priority dateMay 11, 1957
Publication numberUS 2934066 A, US 2934066A, US-A-2934066, US2934066 A, US2934066A
InventorsStowasser Heribert
Original AssigneeLohmann Kg
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Metallized bandaging material especially for the treatment of wounds
US 2934066 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent METALLIZED BANDAGING MATERIAL ESPE- CIALLY F OR THE TREATMENT OF WOUNDS Heribert StoWasser, Neuwied (Rhine), Germany, assignor to Lohmann K.G., Fahr am Rhine, Germany No Drawing. Application May 12, 1958 Serial No. 734,405

Claims priority, application Germany May 11, 1957 8 Claims. (Cl. 128-156) The present invention concerns a metallized bandaging material for therapeutic, disinfectant and other purposes in connection with the treatment of wounds. Bandaging materials for wounds in the form of fabrics and foils are known which, due to the particular weaving of the material involved, due to an after-treatment of the respective fiber material or due to backings of absorbent layers allow exudate to pass through or to be absorbed thereby. Also metallic foils for instance smooth foils of silver or aluminum, which by themselves are non-absorbent and therefore do not stick to the exudate have been employed as cover material for wounds. In this connection, metals are used which, due to their chemical properties, do not disturb the healing of the wound and have bactericidal and the healing process promoting properties. The metallic perforated layer which directly faces the wound may be combined in different manners with layers of absorbent material.

In connection with other wound covering and bandaging material, it is known to use metal fabrics or metallized textiles with large meshes which like a lattice network rest upon the wound but because of their smooth surface do not stick to the exudate or granulation. Such metal fabrics or metallized fabrics or textiles must allow the exudate to pass therethrough into absorbent layers of textiles, fleece, or absorbent cellulose. The present invention differs from the above mentioned wound covering or bandaging material in that a metallized bandaging material is employed which comprises an absorbent feltlike compacted fiber fleece with fine pores or capillaries, while the surface of the fibers is covered with a thin metal coating. The absorbing capacity of the thus formed carrier material is determined by the quantity of the deposited metal employed for said metal coating. At the same time the surface layer may be solidified to prevent changes in the form, i.e. to preserve the respective form, whereas the absorption ability or the degree of permeability may be determined by the amount of the metal. If the metal layer upon the individual fiber is not completely closed, also the fiber, as far as it is fluid absorbent, may absorb the exudate. If the metal layer on the individual fibers is completely closed, the capillary absorbing force of the high-porous fiber layers will be effective.

The metallized carrier material may consist of single layer fiber fleeces or multi-layer fiber structures. If greater quantities of exudates are expected to form and to be taken care of, the moisture permeable metallized material has that side thereof which points away from the wound lined or backed with absorbing material such as cellulose etc.

If the material is non-absorbing and consists for instance of polyamide fibers or other synthetic fibers, the absorbing capacity will be restricted to the capillarity of the fiber fleece.

In addition to fiat or plane wound coverings which snugly contact the skin, also articles of feminine hygiene, tampons or the like may be made from fleece material and may be subsequently metallized or, if desired, such material may be made directly from already metallized substances. The present invention will now be explained in connection with the following examples:

Example I A carding fleece treated according to Example I of German Patent No. 902,427 by means 'of cathode dispersion is covered with from 0.1 to 0.5 gram of aluminum per square meter. The metal coating covers the noninterwoven fibers of the fleece on all sides, however, the fiber is still somewhat absorbent. From the thus metallized material, coverings are cut to size in conformity with the respective requirements and placed directly upon the wound. The backing of the material is effected by compressed cellulose.

Example 11 A five-layer carding fleece of polyamide fibers is passed through an apparatus in which silver is evaporated in a vacuum and deposited on said polyamide fibers. The thus evaporated metal penetrates and is deposited upon the entire fleece which latter then represents a non-interwoven but still coherent structure with very fine pores due to which the material will be highly absorbent. Such wound coverings have a completely smooth surface, snugly rest upon the wound and convey the exudate without sticking to the wound. The metallized wound covering is then backed with absorbent layers of cellulose or the like.

The bandaging material or Wound covering produced in the above manner has a completely smooth surface. It is form-preserving, and its coherence is further improved by the metallization at the crossing points of the fibers.

All healing promoting metals, especially bactericidal metals such as silver, aluminum, zinc are suitable as metal coating for the purpose of the present invention. However, also other metals such as earth alkali metals and also metal oxides may be employed in connection with the present invention.

The metallization may be carried out in any convenient manner which will make possible the production of a fine coating and of a proper metering or control of the quantity of metal employed so as to assure a surface of the wound covering of a desired thickness and porosity.

The material is boil-resistant and can easily be kept sterile so that it is particularly well suitable for employment when mass injuries such as in disaster areas are encountered. In this connection, it is especially advantageous that wounds covering a large area can equally Well be treated as small and deep wounds. The metallization assures that the material remains in spread condition without any wrinkles, while on the other hand the metallization effected in the above outlined manner will allow the passage of exudate even when larger area wounds are involved which develop particularly great quantities of exudate. The porosity of a multi-layer fleece may be varied as to the size of the pores or capillaries.

If a fleece is produced from fibers which, due to their inner solidification of the fleece or due to other treatment have a desired curling, this will further increase the porosity of the product. The size of the pores or capillaries may vary for instance from 0.06 to 0.09 millimeter. The thickness of the fibers may amount to approximately 0.02 millimeter so that several hundred individual fibers will cover a square centimeter when the weight of the fleece is approximately 40 grams per square meter.

What I claim is:

1. A metallized bandaging material for the treatment of wounds comprising an absorbent, felt-like condensed fibre fleece with fine pores; and a thin metal coating covering the surfaces of the fibres.

2. A metallized bandaging material for the treatment of wounds comprising an absorbent, felt-like condensed fibre fleece with fine pores; and a thin metal coating covering the surfaces of the fibres, the absorption of said fleece being determined by the amount of coating metal.

3. A metallized bandaging material for the treatment of-wo'unds comprising an'absorbent, felt-like condensed fibre fleece with fine pores, the surface of said fibre'fleece being form-resistantly solidified, by a metal coating covering the surfaces of the fibres.

4. A metallized bandaging material for the treatment of wounds comprising an absorbent, felt-like condensed fibre fleece with fine pores, the surface of said fibre fleece being form-resistantly solidified by a metal coating covering the surfaces of the fibres, theabsorption of said fleece being determined by the amount of coating metal.

5. A metallized bandaging material for the treatment of wounds comprising a backing of absorbent material carrying an absorbent, felt-like condensed fibre fleece with fine pores; and a thin metal coating covering the surfaces of the fibres.

6. A metallized bandaging material for the treatment of wounds comprising a backing of absorbent material carrying an absorbent, felt-like condensed fibre fleece with fine pores; and a thin metal coating covering the V V .4 4 it surfaces of the fibres, the absorption of said fleece being determined by the amount of coating metal.

7. A metallized bandaging material for the treatment of wounds comprising a backing of absorbent material carrying an absorbent, felt-like condensed fibre fleece with fine pores; the surface of said fibre fleece being form-resistantly solidified by a metal coating covering the surfaces of the fibres. i

8. A metallized bandaging material for the treatment of wounds comprising a backing of absorbent material carrying an absorbent, felt-like condensed fibre fleece with fine pores, the surface of said fibre fleece being formresistantly solidified by a metal coating covering the surfaces of the fibres, the absorption of said fleece being determined by the amount of coating metal.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

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Classifications
U.S. Classification602/43, 602/48, 604/358, 428/96, 604/304
International ClassificationA61F13/15, A61F13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61F2013/00255, A61F2013/00863, A61F2013/0091, A61F2013/51095, A61F2013/00936, A61F13/00021
European ClassificationA61F13/00