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Publication numberUS2935170 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 3, 1960
Filing dateJul 14, 1955
Priority dateJul 14, 1955
Publication numberUS 2935170 A, US 2935170A, US-A-2935170, US2935170 A, US2935170A
InventorsHolstein Alvin W, Marr Elmer S
Original AssigneeNat Vendors Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin controlled apparatus
US 2935170 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 3, 1960 A. w. HOLSTEIN EIAL 2,935,170

com CONTROLLED APPARATUS Filed July 14, 1955 3 Sheets-Sheet l I H61. Q

y 1960 A. w. HOLSTEIN ET AL 2,935,170

COIN CONTROLLED APPARATUS Filed July'l4, 1955 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 y 1960 A. w. HOLSTEIN ET AL 2,935,170

I com CONTROLLED APPARATUS Filed July 14, 1955 s Sheets-Sheet a 19, 19a. .spacers 21, 21a, 21b, 21c and plates 23, 23a.

nited States Patent O CDEN CGNTRGLLED APPARATUS Alvin W. Holstein, Lemay, and Elmer S. Marr, St. Louis, Mo assignors, by mesne assignments, to National Vendors, Inn, a corporation of Missouri Application July 14, 1955, Serial No. 522,021

8 Claims. (Cl. 194-49) This invention relates to coin-controlled apparatus, and more particularly to apparatus of this class for use in a vending machine to control the dispensing of items of difierent prices, and capable of accepting various coins and various combinations of coins.

Among the several objects of the invention may be noted the provision of coin-controlled apparatus adapted to register the total value of coins deposited in the apparatus, which is wholly mechanical, without any electrical components; the provision of apparatus of this class which is capable of accepting coins of various denominations (nickels, dimes and quarters, for example), and which is adapted to register the total value of any combination of coins deposited in the apparatus; and the provision of apparatus of this class which is economical to manufacture and reliable in operation. Other objects and features will be in part apparent and in part pointed out hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises the constructions hereinafter described, the scope of the invention being indicated in the following claims.

In the accompanying drawings, in which one of various possible embodiments of the invention is illustrated,

Fig. 1 is a view in elevation of an apparatus constructed in accordance with the invention, parts being broken away;

Fig. 2 is a plan view of Fig. l; and,

Figs. 3, 4 and are sections taken on lines 3-3, 4--4 and 5-5, respectively, of Fig. 2.

Corresponding reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views of the drawlugs.

Referring to the drawings, a coin-controlled apparatus embodying the principles of this invention is shown to include a main plate 1 carrying a coin chute assembly 3. A plate 5 is located outward of the coin chute assembly 3, being secured to the plate 1 by fasteners which include spacers 7. The assembly 3 provides three coin chutes 9, 11 and 13, side-by-side. Chute 9 is for nickels, chute 11 for dimes, chute 13 for quarters. The assembly 3 comprises outer plates 15 and 15a (see Fig. 1), spacers 17, 17a, 17b, 170 (see Fig. 3), a first set of intermediate plates 19, 19a, spacers 21, 21a, 21b, 210 (see Fig. 4), a

. second set of intermediate plates 23, 23a, and spacers 25, 25a, 25b, 250 (see Fig. 5).

The nickel chute is defined by plates 15, 15a, spacers 17, 17a, 17b, 17c and plates The dime chute is defined by plates 19, 19a,

The quarter chute is defined by plates 23, 23a, spacers 25, 25a, 25b, 25c and the main plate 1.

Plates 15 and 15a, 19 and 19a, 21 and 21a define an arcuate slot 27 which, as shown in Figs. 1 and 3-5, ex-

.tends for about 180 from a point about half-way up the right-hand edge of the assembly 3 to a point adjacent the lower end of the right-hand edge of the assembly 3. The chutes 9, 11 and 13 have portions 9a, 11a and 13a, re-

spectively, following the arc of slot 27, and portions 9b,

111: and 13b, respectively, which diverge away from the I chute.

are of slot 27. The slot 27 passes out of register with the chutes 9, 11 and 13 at points 90, 11c and 130, respectively. The chutes are formed so that point 110 is below point 90, and point 130 is below 110.

It will be understood that the apparatus will generally be used in a vending machine having a slot for nickels, dimes and quarters. Coins deposited in the slot will enter a coin selector and slug rejector device (not shown) which operates to deposit nickels in the nickel chute, dimes in the dime chute and quarters in the quarter The coin selector and slug rejector device also acts to reject coins of improper denominations (pennies) and spurious coins. Coin selector and slug rejector devices suitable for the purpose are well known: see, for example, US. Patent 2,292,628. p

A stud 29 is mounted in the plate 5 at the center of the are of slot 27 and extends toward the plate 1. This stud serves as a pivot for a lever 31 having a finger 33 at its left end as shown in Fig. 1 which extends across all three of the coin chutes 9, 11 and 13 through the slot 27. The right end of the lever is connected by a link 35 to a totalizer generally designated 37. The totalizer 37 is shown as comprising a ratchet 39 on a shaft 41. A lever 43 is rotary on the shaft 41. The link 35 is connected to the lever 43. The lever 43 carries a pivoted driving pawl 45 for the ratchet. A holding pawl for the ratchet is indicated at 47. The ratchet 39 is biased to rotate clockwise as viewed in Fig. 1 by a spiral return spring 49 to a zero position determined by the engagement of a pin 51 on the ratchet 39 with a fixed stop 53. The lever 31 normally occupies the position shown in Fig. 1 wherein finger 33 is located some distance above point 90 where slot 27 passes out of register with the nickel chute. This position of lever 31 is determined by its engagement with a fixed stop 54;

A nickel, dime or quarter deposited in the respective chute 9, 11 or 13 falls in the chute to the point where it engages the finger 33. It is then engaged by a coin-driving means generally designated 55, and driven downward in its respective chute with sufiicient force to swing the lever 43 counterclockwise as viewed in Fig. 1 against the bias of the totalizer return spring 49. The coin-driving means comprises a spider member having a hub 57 mounted on the stud 29, and three arms 59 radiating from the hub at 120 intervals, with a drive finger 61 at the outer end of each arm adapted to travel through the arcuate slot 27. A pinion 63 is fixed on the hub 57. At 65 is shown a spring motor having a gear 67 in mesh with the pinion 63. The bias of the spring motor on the pinion 63 and spider 55 is counterclockwise as viewed in Fig. 1.

A gear 69 is fixed on the hub 57. This gear 69 meshes with a pinion 71'ro'tary on a stud 73. The diameter of the pinion 71 is one-third that of the gear 69. The pinion 71 has a radial arm 75. This arm 75 is engageable with a downwardly extending finger 77 at the right end of a latching lever 79 as viewed in Fig. 1. Lever 79 is pivoted at 81 and biased toward latching position by a spring 83. A shaft 85 carries a disk 87 having a pin 89 engageable with the left end of the latching lever. A lever 91 consisting of a length of stiff wire has one end fixed to the shaft 85 and has a finger 93 at its other and free end which extends into an arcuate slot 95 in the coin chute assembly, across all three coin chutes. The slot 95 extends downward from near the upper end of the coin chutes and at its lower end curves away from the chutes as indicated at 96. A spring 97 connected to the disk 87 biases the lever 91 to a retracted position deter mined by engagement of the finger 93 with the upper end of the slot 95 (see Fig. 1). Slot 95 intersects slot 27.-

The arrangement 'is such that any coin (whether a nickel, dime or quarter) falling in its respective chute engages the finger 93 and swings the lever 91 downward against the bias of the spring 97. The coin drives the finger 93 downward until the coin engages the finger 33 on lever 31. Upon downward swing of the lever 91, pin 89 engages the left end of the latching lever 79 and rocks lever 79 counterclockwise against the bias of spring 33.

. This results in the finger '77 at the right end of the latch- 7 ing lever 79 being raised clear of the arm 75 on pinion 71.

lutiontand before pinion 71 has completed a full revolution). When the spider member (and gear 69) complete a third of a revolution .(and pinion 71 completes a full revolution), the arm 75 on pinion 71 strikes the 'finger 77 and this arrests the rotation of the spider member (and gear 69), after the finger 61 which initially occupied position A has rotated to the position indicated at B, and the finger at B has moved to the position indicated at C, and the finger at C has moved to A.

Operation is as follows:

Assuming that a nickel is deposited in the nickel chute 9, it engages the finger 93, swings the lever 91 downward, and comes into engagement with the finger 33 on the lever "31. Upon the downward swing of the lever 91, the latching-lever 79 is rocked to release the arm 75, as above described, and this frees member 55 to be driven in counterclockwise direction as viewed in Fig; 1 by power lever 31 counterclockwise as viewed in Fig. 1, thereby moving the link 35 upward and rocking the lever 43 counterclockwise. The driving pawl 45 thereupon acts to rotate the ratchet counterclockwise against the bias of the return spring 49. The amplitude X (see Fig. 3) of the swing of lever 31, which is determined by the spacing of finger33 from po'int 90 when the finger 33 is in its 7 normal position, is such as to efiect stepping of the ratchet through a one-tooth interval. The holding pawl 47 maintains the ratchet in the position to which it has been stepped. Assuming that another nickel is deposited in the nickel chute, the ratchet will be stepped up an other one-to'oth interval in exactly the same manner, and so on for any additional nickels up to the range of the ratchet. 'Each step of the ratchet thus represents a fivecent increment.

Assuming that a dime is deposited in the dime chute 11, like a nickel, it engages the finger 93, swings the lever 91 downward, and comes into engagement with the which is determined by the spacing of finger 33 from point 110 when the finger 33 is in its normalposition,

is twice X and hence suchaas to effect stepping of the ratchet through a two-tooth interval (a total of ten cents). The holding pawl 47 maintains the ratchet in the position to which it has been stepped. Assuming that another dime is deposited in the dime chute, the ratchet will be stepped up another two-tooth interval in exactly the same manner (a total of twenty cents). If a nickel is deposited following a dime, the ratchet will be further stepped a one-tooth interval (a total of fifteen cents).

Assuming that a quarter is deposited in the quarter chute 13, like a nickel or a dime it engages the finger 93, swings the lever 91 downward, and comes into engage ment with the finger 33 on the lever 31. Upon the downward swing of the lever 91, the latching lever 79 is rocked to release the arm 75, as above described, and

this frees member 55 to be driven in counterclockwise direction as viewed in Fig. 1 by power derived from the spring'motor 65, in the same manner as in the case of a nickel or dime deposited in the nickel or dime chute. The member 55 rotates. through a third of arevolution as above described. The drive finger 61, which initially Z (see Fig. 5) of the swing of lever 31, which is determined by the spacing of finger 33 from point 130 when the finger 33 is in'its normal position, is five times X 7 and hence such as to eflfect stepping of the ratchet through a five-tooth interval (a total of twenty-five cents). The holding pawl 47 maintains the ratchet in the position to which it has been stepped. Assuming that another quarter is deposited in the quarter chute, the ratchet will be stepped up another five-tooth interval in exactly the same manner. If a nickel is deposited following a quarter, the ratchet will be further stepped a one-tooth interval (a total of thirty cents). If a dime is deposited following a quarter, the ratchet will be further stepped a two-tooth interval (a total of fthirty-five cents).

The rotation of the ratchet 39 through different fractions of a revolution corresponding to diiferent amounts deposited may be utilized in various ways to control the vending machine in which the coin apparatus is used. For example, the rotation of the ratchet may be utilized to release locking means in the vending machine. It will be understood that suitable means (not shown) will 7 be provided for releasing the holding pawl 47 at the finger '33 on the lever 31. Upon the downward swing of.

the lever 91, the latching lever 79 is rocked to release the arm 75, as above described,and this frees member to be driven in counterclockwise direction as viewed in Fig. 1 by power derived from the spring motor 65, in the same manner as in the case of a nickel deposited in the nickel chute. The member 55 rotates through a third of a revolution as above described. 'The drive finger 61,

which initially occupied the position A, comes into engagement with the dime and drives it downward in the dime chute. "33 to rock the totalizer actuating lever 31 counterclock- The dime thereupon acts against the finger counterclockwise against the bias of the return spring 49. The amplitude Y (see Fig. 4) of the swing of lever 31,

termination of a vending cyclefor resetting the ratchet to its zero position. tive 'of various suitable means for biasing the coindriving spider 55 in coin-driving direction. This spring motor may be manually periodically wound. It is also contemplated that it be maintained wound by having a connection thereto from the dispensing mechanism of the vending machine so that the spring is rewound on Part of a linkage for accomplishing such winding of the spring is indicated in dotted lines at 99 in Fig. 1.

In view of the above, it will be seen that the several objects of the-invention are achieved and other advantageous results attained.

As various changes could be made in the abovecom structions without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

We claim:

1. Coin apparatuscomprising a coin chute assembly The spring motor 65 is representat providing first and second coin chutes for coins of a firs and a second denomination, said chutes being located side-by-side, means for driving a coin along a portion of its chute, said coin-driving means being biased in coin-' driving direction, means for holding the coin-driving means against movement under the bias, means actuated by the weight of a coin falling in its chute for releasing said holding means, said chute assembly having a slot traversing both of said chutes, a lever pivoted on an axis transverse to the planes of the chutes having a finger extending laterally across the chutes from one side of the chute assembly through said slot, an indexing means operable by said lever, said finger being engageable by a coin being driven by said driving means in either chute and being driven thereby in an arcuate path for swinging the lever in one direction, said lever being biased in the opposite direction to a retracted position, and being movable in said one direction away from said retracted position by a coin travelling in either of the chutes, and said chutes being so formed in relation to the arcuate path of said finger as to guide a coin of the first denomination in the first chute to disengage from the finger after this coin has moved the finger a first distance and to guide a coin of the second denomination travelling in the second chute to disengage from the finger after this coin has moved the finger a second distance with the ratio of said distances corresponding to the ratio of the value of the coins.

2. Coin apparatus as set forth in claim 1 wherein said coin-driving means comprises a rotary member having angularly spaced coin-engaging means extending across the chutes through said slot, and wherein there is provided spring means tending to rotate said rotary member in coin-driving direction.

3. Coin apparatus comprising a coin chute assembly providing a nickel chute, a dime chute and a quarter chute, said chutes being located side-by-side and closely adjacent one another, said chute assembly having a slot traversing all the chutes, a lever pivoted on an axis transverse to the planes of the chutes having a finger extending laterally across all three of the chutes from one side of the chute assembly through said slot, an indexing member operable through one step for a nickel, two steps for a dime and five steps for a quarter, said finger being engageable by a nickel, dime or quarter travelling in its respective chute and being driven thereby in an arcuate path for swinging the lever in one direction, said lever being biased in the opposite direction to a retracted position, and being movable in said one direction away from said retracted position by a nickel, dime or quarter travelling in its respective chute, said nickel chute being so formed in relation to the arcuate path of said finger as to guide a nickel to disengage from the finger after the nickel has moved the lever through an angle such as to drive the indexing member through one step, said dime chute being so formed in relation to the arcuate path of said finger as to guide a dime to disengage from the finger after the dime has moved the lever through approximately twice said angle so as to drive the indexing member through two steps, and said quarter chute being so formed in relation to the arcuate path of said finger as to guide a quarter to disengage from the finger after the quarter has moved the lever through approximately five times said angle so as to drive the indexing member through five steps.

4. Coin apparatus as set forth in claim 3 wherein the nickel chute is formed so that the arcuate path of the finger passes out of register with the nickel chute at a point determining said angle, and the dime chute is differently formed so that the arcuate path of the finger passes out of register with the dime chute at a different point determining twice said angle, and the quarter chute is still difierently formed so that the arcuate path of the finger passes out of register with the quarter chute at still a difierent point determining five times said angle.

6 t 5. Coin apparatus comprising a coin chute assembly providing a'nickel chute, a dime chute and a quarter chute, said chutes being located side-by-side and closely adjacent one another, means for driving a coin along a portion of its chute, said coin-driving means being biased in coin-driving direction, means for holding the coindriving means against movement under the bias, means actuated by the weight of a coin falling in its chute for releasing said holding means, said chute assembly having a slot traversing all the chutes, a lever pivoted on an axis transverse to the planes of the chutes having a finger extending laterally across the chutes from one side of the chute assembly through said slot, an indexing member operable by said lever through one step for a nickel, two steps for a dime and five steps for a quarter, said finger being engageable by a coin being driven by said coindriving means in any one of the chutes and being driven thereby in an arcuate path for swinging the lever in one direction, said lever being biased in the opposite direction to a retracted position, and being movable in said one direction away from said retracted position by a coin being driven by said coin-driving means in any one of the chutes, said nickel chute being so formed in relation to the arcuate path of said finger as to guide a nickel to disengage from the finger after the nickel has moved the lever through an angle such as to drive the indexing member through one step, said dime chute being so formed in relation to the arcuate path of said finger as to guide a dime to disengage from the finger after the dime has moved the lever through approximately twice said angle so as to drive the indexing member through two steps, and said quarter chute being so formed in relation to the arcuate path of said finger as to guide a quarter to disengage from the finger after the quarter has moved the lever through approximately five times said angle so as to drive the indexing member through five steps.

6. Coin apparatus as set forth in claim 5 wherein said coin-driving means comprises a rotary member having angularly spaced coin-engaging means extending across the chutes through said slot, and wherein there is provided spring means tending to rotate said rotary member in coin-driving direction.

7. Coin apparatus comprising a coin chute assembly providing first and second coin chutes for coins of a first and second denomination, said chutes being located sideby-side, means for driving a coin along a portion of its chute, said coin-driving means being biased in coin-driving direction, means for holding the coin-driving means against movement under the bias, means actuated by the weight of a coin falling in its chute for releasing said holding means, said chute assembly having a slot traversing both of said chutes, a movable member having a portion extending across the chutes from one side of the chute assembly through said slot, an indexing means operable by said movable member, said portion of said movable member being engageable by a coin being driven by said driving means in either chute and being driven thereby in one direction for moving said member in one direction, said member being biased in the opposite direction to a retracted position, and being movable in said one direction away from said retracted position by a coin travelling in either of the chutes, and said chutes being so formed in relation to the path of movement of said portion of said member as to guide a coin of the first denomination in the first chute to disengage from said portion after this coin has moved said portion a first distance and to guide a coin of the second denomination travelling in the second chute to disengage from said portion after this coin has moved said portion a second distance with the ratio of said distances corresponding to the ratio of the value of the coins.

8. Coin apparatus comprising coin chute means for coins of a first and a second denomination, means for driving a coin along a portion of said chute means, said coin-driving means beingbiasedin coin-driving-idirec- .tio'n, means for holding the coin-'driving means against movement under the bias, means actnatedby the weight of a ,coin fallinginsaid chute means for releasing said holding means, a movable member .engageable by a coin being driven by said driving means and adaptedto'be driven thereby in one direction, said member being biased in the opposite direction to a retracted position, an indexing means operable by said member, said chutem'eans being so formed in relation to the path of movement of said member as to guide a coin of thefirst denomination to disengage from said member after this coin hasmoved said member a first distance and to guide a coin of the second denomination to disengage from said member with the said distances qr sp n ing to the ratio of the value of the coins." v V References Cited in the file pf-this patent 7 V UNITED STATES PATENTS,

449,024 Allin Marga-1891 2,170,270 Thatcher Aug. '22, 1939. 2,276,449 Andres Mar.,17, 1-942 2,329,926 Michaels Sept. 21, 194-3 2,625,250 Hale -2 Jan. 13,1953 2,639,016 York May 19,1953 2,769,023 Loew Oct. 30, 19 56 FOREIGN, PATENTS 7 Great Britain "Jan. 1, 194;

Patent Citations
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US449024 *Oct 12, 1888Mar 24, 1891 allijn
US2170270 *Dec 2, 1937Aug 22, 1939Pitney Bowes Postage Meter ComCoin operated mailing machine
US2276449 *May 19, 1939Mar 17, 1942Automatic Instr CompanyMultiple coin receiver
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3100035 *Dec 14, 1960Aug 6, 1963Rock Ola Mfg CorpCredit accumulator
US4583630 *Sep 25, 1984Apr 22, 1986Bernard KalishmanCoin chutes for a coin apparatus
US5310035 *Sep 23, 1992May 10, 1994Revenco CorporationPaper and coin currency totalizer for an existing vending machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification194/227, 184/84
International ClassificationG07F5/20
Cooperative ClassificationG07F5/20
European ClassificationG07F5/20