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Publication numberUS2935894 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 10, 1960
Filing dateJun 2, 1958
Priority dateJun 2, 1958
Publication numberUS 2935894 A, US 2935894A, US-A-2935894, US2935894 A, US2935894A
InventorsCoronado-Arce Manuel
Original AssigneeElectro Snap Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Actuator mechanism
US 2935894 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May lo, M. CORONADO..ARCE ACTUATOR MECHANISM Filed June 2, 1958 United States Patent O 'i 2,935,894 ACTUAToR MECHANISM Manuel Coronado-Arce, Chicago, Ill., assigner to lectrollsp Corporation, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illi- Applicaaun June 2, 195s, serial No. 739,171 16 claims. (ci. 745503) This invention relates to actuator mechanisms of Ithe alternate action or so-called push-pus type, and has for its principal object the provision of a new and improved mechanism of rthis kind.A

It is a main object of the invention to provide a pushpush actuator mechanism that is compact in design and reliable in its action. v

Another object of the invention is to provide a pushpush actuator mechanism which is positively locked in operated position and not affected by vibrations.

Another object of the invention is to provide an actuator mechanism the main parts of which travel from normal to operated position solely in translatory motion.

Another object of the invention is to provide an actuator mechanism of the push-push Vtype that is positive in its action both on operation and release.

Another object of the invention is to provide a pushpush actuator mechanism that can be manufactured at low cost without sacrificing quality.

Further objects of the invention not specifically mentioned here will be apparent from the detailed specification and claims which follow, reference being had to lthe accompanying drawings in whichV a preferred embodiment of the invention is shown by way of example and in which: v

Fig. 1 is an elevational view showing the actuator of the present invention applied to an electric switch;

Fig. 2 is a view partly in section, along the line 2 2 of Fig. 4, drawn to an enlarged scale and showing `the actuator in normal position;

Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig. 2, showing the actuator in operated position; and

Fig. 4 is a cross sectional view taken .along the line 4-4 of Fig. 2, looking in the direction of the arrows.

Alternate action mechanisms, commonly called pushpush mechanisms, are frequently used to operate electric switches and other similar devices. Such mechanisms usually include a push button which pressed a first time moves the device from a normal to an operated position. The next pushing of the button reverses the operation,- that is, moves the device from its operated to its normal position. The present invention relates to such an actuator mechanism.

`Push-push mechanisms of the prior art of which I vam aware have frequently incorporated an actuator whose 'movement from normal to operated positionincluded rotation either around theaxis of the actuator or around an axis at right angles thereto. vThe mechanism of the present Vinvention involves only translatory motion inthe travel of its actuator from normal to operated position. Also, in the mechanism of the present invention, the actuator is positively locked or latched in its operated position and isnot affected by vibration. Y

Referring now to the drawings in more detail, the actuator of the present invention'is housed in a bushing 1 having external vthreads 2 and the usual keyway 3 for the reception of a lug Washer by which rotation of the bushing around its axis is prevented when the bushing is v2,935,894 Patented May 19 19,60

mounted upon a panel. The bushing 1 contains an end Wall 4, in the upper surface of which a socket 5 is indented, that part 5 of the end wall 4 beneath the socket containing a circular perforation 6 from which diametrically opposed slots 7 lextend to the outer periphery ofthe socket 5. The bushing thus takes the form of a hollow cylinder partially closed at its lower end. j

Fitted within this cylinder is a sleeve S which is in kthe form of a hollow cylinder the lower end of which sleeve 8 and lbelow this perforationv is an elongated slot 14.

Slidably fitted within the sleeve 8 is an actuator 15 which is cylindrical in form and contains a keyway slot 16 that extends from end to end of the actuator. Projecting radially outwardly from the cylindrical portion yof the actuator is a collar-17 that has sliding t engagement with the inner surface of the sleeve S.

The ,actuator 15 has sliding fit engagement with the portions of the end wall 4 defining the perforations 6 v therein, and this engagement of the actuator with the wall together with the engagement ofthe collar 17 with the sleeve S mainains the actuator concentrically in thesleeve.

Mounted in the -keyway groove 16 of the actuator is a rocker 18 supported upon a pivot 19 and having end portions 20 and 21 which engage the inner surface of the sleeve 8 when the actuator is in normal position. A spring 22, fitted in a groove 23 in the actuator, bears against the rocker 18, tending to rotate it co'uxiterclockwise,l as seen in Fig. `2, around its pivot19.

Mounted outside of the sleeve 8 is a latch 24 that is L-shaped and has one of its legs projecting into the slot 14 in the sleeve. The other leg of the latch contains a perforation in which is seated a ball 25 that projects Y through the opening 13 in the sleeve S into engagement with the collar 17 when the actuator is in normal position. A spring 26 encircles the sleeve 3 and engages the latch 24 and ball 25, and is tensioned to urge these'membrs inwardly towards the center of the sleeve. on the spring 26 projects into the slot 12 in the collar 11 of the sleeve to prevent rotation of the spring around the axis of the sleeve. Y

Mounted in the bushing 1 is a push button 30 that'is equipped with an outwardly extending flange 31 and a centrally located hollow boss 32 that is telescoped into the sleeve 8 and into the hollow portion of which the actutor 15 is telescoped. It will be noted that the lower edge of the boss 32 is beveled, as indicated at 33, and that the adjacent end of the end portion 20 of the rocker 18; beveled at the same angle. A coil spring 34 surrounds the boss 32 and sleeve 3 and is abutted against the colla; -11 on the sleeve and the fiange 31 on the push button 'to urge the push button upwardly, as seen irl-Fig. 2. "A

retaining ring 35, fitted against a shoulder in the bushof the switch abuts against the end of the actuator 1,5.

When it is desired to operate the Vswitch 39, pressure is applied to -t-he push `button 30, moving 4it downwardly.

The beveled end 33 of the boss 32 being engaged with A tongue 27 e assess-1. A e

the end of the rocker 18, moves that rocker downwardly. Since the rocker is pivotally connected to the actuator y15, the actuator is likewise moved downwardly in translatory motion, thereby forcing the operating button 40 of the switch downwardly, as seen in Fig. 2, to effect an operation of the switch. Movement of the actuator 15 downwardly moves the collar 17 out of engagement with the ball 25, permitting that ball to move inwardly through the opening 13 thereby bringing the end of the latch 24, which projects through the opening 14, into engagement with the edge of the collar. Further downward movement of the actuator 15 moves the collar 17 downwardly out of engagement with the latch 24, whereupon spring -26 moves the latch and ball inwardly so that the lower .end ofthe latch 24 overhangs the upper edge of the collar 17 thereby to positively latch the actuator in operated position independently of the push button 30. Downward movement of the actuator 15 is arrested by engagement of the lower surface of the collar 17 with the portions of the end wall 4 of the bushing disposed alongside of the opening 6 therein. This occurs when the collar has moved sufficiently far to permit the latch '24 to be moved inwardly into latching position, at which time the button 40 of the switch 39 will be in its fully operated position and damage to the switch mechanism is thereby definitely prevented.

During downward movement of the actuator 15, the ,end portion 21 of the rocker 18 is moved out of engagement with the tongue 9 on the sleeve 8, thus freeing the rocker for rotation around its pivot 19. As pressure is `removed from plunger 30, spring 34 moves it upwardly land the end 33 of the boss 32 is thus backed away from kthe end of the rocker 18. Spring 22 then rotates the rocker, moving it from the position in which it is shown `in Fig. 2 into the position shown in Fig. 3. It will be `noted that in this latter position, the end portion 20 is positioned entirely within the slot 16.

It will be noted that it is not necessary for the push button 30 to return completely to normal to condition l '4 metal or plastic, within the teachings of the invention.

While the invention is illustrated by showing its connection with an electric switch, such illustration is by way of example only, as the actuator of the present invention may be put to other uses within the teachings of the invention.

While I have chosen to show my invention by illustrating and describing a preferred embodiment of it, I have done so by vway of example only, as there are many modifications and adaptations which can be made by one skilled inthe art within the teachings ofthe invention.

Having thus complied with the statutes and shown and described thepreferred embodiment of my invention, what I consider new. and desire to have protected by Letters Patent is pointed out in the appended claims.

What I claim is:

l. A push-push actuator mechanism comprising: a

hollow Vcylindrical bushing; a hollow cylindrical sleeve the ball 25 outwardly and thereby move the latch 24 outwardly. As soon as the push button has been fully operated, the boss 32 thereon will be sumciently far down in the sleeve 8 to cause the ball to bear against the outer surface of the boss, thereby .to hold it in the outward position in Which it is shown in Fig. 2. As pressure on the push button 30 is released, the spring bearing against the operating button 40 of the switch 39 raises the actuator 15, moving the collar 17 thereon into engagement with the latch 24 and later with the ball 25 as the actuator returns to normal position. Upward movement of the actuator 15 engages the beveled edge of the end portion 21 on the rocker with the bent-over portion 10 of the tongue 9 of the sleeve, thereby to rotate the rocker 18 in a clockwise direction, as seen in Fig. 3, into the position in which it is shown in Fig. 2, this rotation tensioning the spring 22 in readiness for a subsequent operation of the mechanism. As soon as the outer surface of the end portion 20 is moved into engagement with the -inner surface of the sleeve 8, further rotation of the rocker 18 is prevented and the rocker will thus be held in the position in which it is shown in Fig. 2.

Preferably the bushing '1 and the bracket 37 are formed of metal suitably plated for appearances sake and to prevent rusting. The sleeve 8 might likewisey advantageously be formed of metal suitably plated, and the actuator 15 and rocker 18 may be formed either of concentrically iixed in said bushing; a cylindrical actuator concentrically disposed in said sleeve; a rocker pivotally mounted on said actuator and having end portions nor- 'mally engaging the sleeve; a push button iitted in said bushing and extending outwardly therefrom; means for limiting movement of said push button outwardly of said bushing; a hollow boss on said push button telescoped into said sleeve and into Iwhich said actuator is telescoped, said boss engaging said rocker to move the actuator from normal to operated position as the push button moves into the bushing; latch means for holding the actuator in operated position; spring means for moving the end of the rocker engaged by the boss out of the path of the boss; and spring means for moving said push button outwardly of the bushing and into engagement withv said movement limiting means.

2. A mechanism as specified in claim l, in which the bushing contains an end wall having a centrally located -cylindrical socket into which the sleeve projects into periphery of the socket.

4. A mechanism as specified in claim 3, in which the lsleeve contains opposed tongues extending through the slots in the end wall and thence outwardly over the face of the end wall that is remote from the socket -to secure ,the sleeve 4in the bushing.

5. A mechanism as speciiied in claim 4, in which the portions of the end wall against which the sleeve abuts .form opposed shoulders projecting into the sleeve at -the end thereof.

` 6.. A mechanism as specified in claim 5, in which the 'sleeve Acontains a radially outwardly extending collar that engages the bushing and is spaced from the end wall thereof.

7. A mechanism as speciiied in claim 6, in which the -latch means is located between the collar and the end wall of the bushing.

8. A mechanism as specified in claim 7, in which the actuator contains a radially outwardly Yextending collar that engages the sleeve andthe end wall shoulders engage the actuator to guide the actuator during movement longitudinally of the sleeve.

.the actuator -in operated position.

1l. A mechanism as specified in claim 10, in which the latch means comprises: an L-shaped latch one arm of .which projects through a slot in the sleeve'into the path of the actuator collar; a ball projecting .through a second perforation in the sleeve and engaging the actuator and the o-ther arm of 'the latch; and a l-atch spring encircling the sleeve and lengaging the latch and ball to urge the latch means into latching position. Y

12. A mechanism as specified in claim 11, in which the projection on the push button engages -the ball and moves it and the latch outwardly against the tension of the la-tch spring responsive to an operation of the push button to release the actuator from operated position.

13. A'mechanism as speciled inclaim 12, in which the collar on the actuator in normal positionv of the actuator engages ythe ball to hold vthe latch out of the path of the collar and against the tension of the latch spring.

14. A push-push actuator mechanism comprising:l a hollow cylindrical bushing; a hollow cylindrical sleeve fiiXed in said bushing; a cylindrical actuator concentrically disposed in said sleeve; a key groove extending from end to end of lsaid actuator; a rocker disposed in said groove and held therein lay apivot pin located near the midpoint of the rocker, said rocker having end rportions normally engaging the sleeve; a push button fit-ted in said bushing and extending outwardly therefrom; means for limiting movement of said push button outwardly of said bushing; a hollowboss on said push button telescopedv into said sleeve and into which said actuator is telescoped, said boss engaging said rocker to move the actuator from normal to operated position as the push button moves into the bushing; latch means for holding the actuator in operated position; spring means -for moving the end of the rocker engaged by the 4boss out `of .the path of the boss; and spring means for moving said push button outwardly of the bushing and in-to engagement with said movement limiting means.

15. A mechanism as specified inl claim 14, in which, with the actuator in operated position, the spring means moves the end of the rocker adjacent the push button into -the keyway groove and moves the vend of the rocker remote from lthe .push Abutton outwardly beyond `the end of the sleeve.

- 16. A mechanism as specified in claim 15, in which as the actuator moves from operated -to normal position the end of the rocker remote from the push button engages .the sleeve to cause movement ofthe actuator to rotate the rocker on i-ts pivot thereby to move the end of the rocker adjacent the push button out of the keyway groove against the ltension of lthe spring means and into engagement with the sleeve.V

No references cited.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3062071 *Dec 29, 1959Nov 6, 1962Morrow Warren PActuator for triggering system
US3130826 *Oct 12, 1962Apr 28, 1964United Gas CorpLimited-rotation unidirectional drive
US3155789 *Aug 17, 1961Nov 3, 1964Hull Howard LFoot pedal for dimmer switches
US3251240 *Oct 16, 1963May 17, 1966Burroughs CorpMechanical bistable device
US3288973 *Apr 16, 1965Nov 29, 1966Cutler Hammer IncPush-push switch convertible to momentary switch
US3364783 *Aug 10, 1965Jan 23, 1968William H. CoePush button control unit
US3374321 *Apr 22, 1965Mar 19, 1968Gen Motors CorpDirection signal and dimmer switch actuator
US3376088 *Jul 19, 1966Apr 2, 1968BolCabinet drawer and door opener
US3402379 *Mar 14, 1966Sep 17, 1968Korry Mfg CoAlternate latch and unlatch and eject mechanism operated by unidirectional forces
US3694603 *Sep 29, 1971Sep 26, 1972Buttner HoracePush-push switch with improved alternate make and break latching mechanism
US3854785 *Sep 17, 1973Dec 17, 1974Krause Kg RobertActuating device
US3873790 *Sep 13, 1973Mar 25, 1975Hoover CoElectrically actuated floor care appliance having a fluid or pneumatic control arrangement
US5345050 *Jun 1, 1993Sep 6, 1994Caterpillar Inc.Switch actuating assembly
US20110068586 *Apr 14, 2009Mar 24, 2011D. La Porte Soehne GmbhVehicle door lock with inside release lever
Classifications
U.S. Classification74/503, 74/41, 292/DIG.400, 200/520, 74/527
Cooperative ClassificationY10S292/04, G05G5/24