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Publication numberUS2936139 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 10, 1960
Filing dateApr 8, 1959
Priority dateApr 8, 1959
Publication numberUS 2936139 A, US 2936139A, US-A-2936139, US2936139 A, US2936139A
InventorsLindstrom Oscar L
Original AssigneeLindstrom Oscar L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Resilient non-skid supporting shoes with suction cup
US 2936139 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 10, 1960 o. L. LINDSTROM 2,936,139

RESILIEINT NON-SKID SUPPORTING saoas WITH SUCTION CAP Filed April 8, 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 1 III I 11111!!! 1 W r Y 30 May 10, 1960 o. 1.. LINDSTROM 2,936,139

RESILIENT NON-SKID SUPPORTING SHOES WITH SUCTION CAP 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 8, 1959 01cm? 4. zmoJnea/v BY i ram /5y,

RESILIENT NON-SKID SUPPORTING SHOES WITH SUCTION CUP Oscar L. Lindstrom, Green Bay, Wis. Application April 8, 1959, Serial No. 304,922 8 Claims. (Cl. 248-24) My invention relates to support shoes for typewriters,

adding machines, check writers and similar devices.

shoes caused by transmission through a desk or other supporting surface, and also of preventing the machine placed thereon from sliding or slipping during use.

The principal object of the present invention is to provide a non-skid supporting shoe for receiving the feet of business machines such as typewriters, adding machines and other similar equipment found in ofiices.

A further object of the invention is to provide supporting shoes of the type described which form a resilient support for the feet of the machine placed thereon and a support which is normally locked to the surface upon which it is placed, said support also having means thereon to prevent dust or other sediment from accumulating beneath any portion of the shoe while in use.

A further object of the invention is to provide a nonskid supporting shoe of the type described which has a bottom or supporting pad surface configuration for protecting the same against movement in any one of a plurality of directions.

A further object of the invention is to provide a device of the type described which has spring supported means for holding the feet of typewriters or other business machines resiliently upon a surface, and additional means associated therewith for locking the supporting shoe to the surface.

For a more comprehensive understanding of the invention and the many benefits thereof, reference is had machine supporting position;

Fig. 5 is a bottom view of a modified form of the invention;

Fig. 6 is a cross-sectional view thereof taken on the Fig. 7 is a plan viewof a further modified form of .supporting shoe; and

Fig. 8 is a cross-sectional view thereof taken generally on the line 8-8 of Fig. 7.

In the embodiment of the invention which I have chosen to illustrate and describe the same, I provide an inverted cup-shaped shell or housing 10 which may be formed of metal or plastic or any other suitable material. The housing 10 is preferably formed with a shallow well 12 having a flatbottom 14,the edges of the bottom wall 1 1'4 terminating in upwardly depending shoulders 16 that are then turned downwardly to form the concentriccylindrical enclosing wall 18 of the housing. I provide a hard rubber ring 20 mounted between the side wall 18 and the upwardly turned flange 16 at its upper end, the ring 20 having a knife edge 22 at the bottom thereof so that when the weight of a leg .of a typewriter or other machine is placed on the shoe 10 it will deform to the condition shown in Fig. -4, thus effecting an edge seal about the outer periphery of the shoe.

The shoe may also enclose within the ring 20 a somefittes Patent 0 2,936,139 Patented May 10, 1960 what softer rubber disc 24 that has a medial opening 26 through said opening. The bottom edge of the disc 24 is preferably formed with serrations 30 so that when a weight is placed upon the same they will be deformed generally to the condition shown in Fig. 4. The serrations 30 which prevent sliding of the disc 24 and therefore the shoe 10, are preferably directed in a plurality of opposing directions, and as seen in Fig. 3, which is a bottom view of the shoe, the serrations are directed in four opposing directions, the base of the disc being divided into quadrants as shown. However, while quadrants are shown in the drawing, the base can of course be divided into more different sections if desired, the serrations in each section being at an angle to the other serrations.

The vacuum cup 28 may have a face 32 for suction attachment to a surface, the stem 34 of the same extending upwardly in the bore 26 and the stem in turn having a bore 36 therein within which a hollow tubular member 40 may be mounted. The member 40 has a needle valve 42 engaging a minute opening in the side thereof, the valve being screw-threadedly mounted in a boss 44 extending downwardly from the floor 14 of the shallow Well 12.

From the above description it can be seen that when the foot F of a typewriter or other machine of a similar type is positioned in the well 12 of the shoe which I have provided, the weight will first create a suction grip on the surface of the support for the machine, and in addition the serrations 30 on the lower face of the disc 24 will grip the surface to prevent sliding or other movement of the machine during its operation. Also, the sealing ring 18 has been slightly disfigured to press the edge of the lip 22 into contact with the surface of the support about its entire periphery so that no dust or other sediment can come under the shoe 10.

When it is desired to loosen the shoe from attachment to the support, the needle 42 is operated to uncover the opening in the side of the tube 40 to permit air to enter and break the vacuum so that the cup can be released. As will be seen in Fig. 4, rather than provide the needle valve 42 for releasing the vacuum in the cup 28, I have provided a sealing cap 42a which may be made of rubber or other suitable material, and which may be pressed over the open upper end of the tubular member 40.

In the embodiment of the invention shown in Figs. 5 and 6, I have shown a shell 10a which encompasses a sealing ring 18a, the shell 10a having a shallow well 12 formed with a floor 14a. In this embodiment of the invention I prefer to provide a cushion support for receiving the weight of the machine that may include a disc 50 which has a peripheral row of openings 52 therein and a medial opening 54. The rubber vacuum suction cup 28a extending downwardly through suitable openings 64 in the floor 14a of the well 12.

With this construction the operation of the shoe will be "thesame as that generally described in connection with Figs. 1 to 4 inclusive, the plugs 60 having the bottom face serrations 60a so arranged that they will prevent movement of the shoe in any direction.

'In the embodiment of the invention shown in Figs. 7

and 8, I have provided a shoe which may include a cast metal housing 72that has afioor 74'and raised lips 76 enclosing a shallow well 78 for the reception of the foot F of a machine. The housing 70 has a circular opening 80 beneath the floor 74 which receives a rubber disc member 82 within the periphery of a sideedge 84. Suitable nails or screw members .86 may extend downwardly through suitable openings 88in the floor 74 and disc members 82 so that the shoe may be rigidly fastened to a supporting surface if desired, compressing the resilient disc 82 therebetween.

From the above and foregoing description it can be seen that I have provided a unique and novel non-skid shoe or support for typewriters and other business machines of a type which, without being fixedly yet resiliently supported, would be noisy in operation and would have a tendency to move about on the table or desk if.not otherwise restricted. By the use of the improved nonskid supporting shoe which I have provided, the machine is fixedly yet yieldingly held in a'stationary position, and any tremor or vibration which would result in the use of the machine is disseminated in the rubber supporting discs of the shoe. This creates a more satisfactory working condition in that the operation of the machines will be far more quiet, no re-positioning of the machine is necessary due to sliding, and due to the yielding support the machines will be susceptible to longer usage without becoming broken or worn out.

I contemplate that changes or modifications may be made in the exact details shown and I do not wish to be limited in any particular; rather What I desire to secure and protect by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A non-skid supporting shoe of the type described comprising a cylindrical downwardly facing cup-shaped member having a transverse wall, an upwardly extending peripheral shoulder terminating in a concentric downwardly depending flange, a hard rubber encircling ring mounted in the space between said shoulder and said flange, a softer rubber disc member supported within said ring, an axial opening through said disc member and a rubber suction cup mounted in the transverse wall of said housing and extending downwardly below said disc and hard rubber ring. a

2. A non-skid supporting shoe of the type described comprising a cylindrical downwardly facing cup-shaped member having a transverse wall, an upwardly extending peripheral shoulder terminating in a concentric downwardly depending flange, a hard rubber encircling ring mounted in the space between said shoulder and said flange, a softer rubber disc member supported within said ring, an axial opening through said disc member and a rubber suction cup mounted in the transverse wall of said housing and extending downwardly below said disc and hard rubber ring, said rubber disc having serrations in its bottom wall.

3. A non-skid supporting shoe of the type described comprising a cylindrical downwardly facing cup-shaped member having a transverse wall, an upwardly extending peripheral shoulder terminating in a concentric downwardly depending flange, a hard rubber encircling ring mounted in the space between said shoulder and said flange, a softer rubber disc member supported within said ring, an axial opening through said disc member and a rubber suction cup mounted in the transverse wall of said housing and extending downwardly below said discand hard rubber ring, said rubber disc having serrations in its bottom wall and said rubber ring having an inwardly sloped edge at its lower end.

opening above said top wall, a peripheral row of soft rubber plugs fastened to said disc and extending downwardly therefrom through said opening and a rubber suction cup .fastened to said disc and extending downwardly below said plugs and said hard rubber ring.

5. A non-skid support shoe comprising a cylindrical downwardly opening cup-shaped member having a top wall, a circular side wall having a raised peripheral flange, a top shoulder on said flange and a concentric downwardly depending flange, a hard rubber sealing ring mounted between said flanges and extending downwardly therefrom, said top wall having a circular opening therethrough, a flat disc having a diameter larger than said opening above said top wall, a peripheral row of soft rubber plugs fastened to said disc and extending downwardly therefrom through said opening and a rubber suction cup fastened to said disc and extending downwardly below said plugs and said hard rubber ring, said suction cup having a coiled spring around the same normally forcing its peripheral edge downwardly.

6. A non-skid support shoe comprising -a cylindrical downwardly opening cup-shaped member having a top ,wall, a circular side wall having 'a raised peripheral flange, a top shoulder on said flange and a concentric downwardly depending flange, a hard rubber sealing ring mounted between said flanges and extending downwardly therefrom, said top wall having a circular opening therethrough, a flat disc having a diameter larger than said opening above said top wall, a peripheral row of soft rubber plugs fastened to said disc and extending downwardly therefrom through said opening, a rubber suction cup fastened to said disc and extending downwardly below said plugs and said hard rubber ring, said suction cup having a coiled spring around the same normally forcing its peripheral edge downwardly and said plug members all having serrated ends all directed in different directions.

7. A non-skid supporting shoe of the type described comprising a cylindrical downwardly facing cup-shaped member having a transverse wall, an upwardly extending peripheral shoulder terminating in a concentric downwardly depending flange, a hard rubber encircling ring mounted in the space between said shoulder and said flange, the transverse wall of said cup-shaped member having an opening therethrough, a circular metal plate positioned above the transverse wall of said cup-shaped member, a plurality of downwardly depending plug members connected to said metal plate and extending downwardly through the opening in said wall, a rubber suction cup connected to the center of said plate and extending downwardly therefrom and a coiled spring between said plate and the peripheral edge of said suction cup.

8. A non-skid supporting shoe of the type described comprising a cylindrical downwardly facing cup-shaped member having a transverse wall, an upwardly extending peripheral shoulder terminating in a concentricdownwardly depending flange, a hard rubber encircling ring mounted in the space between said shoulder and said flange and extending downwardly therefrom, the transverse wall of said cup-shaped member having an opening therethrough, a circular metal plate positioned above said transverse wall, a plurality of downwardly depending plug members connected to said metal plate and extending downwardly through said opening, a rubber suction cup connected to the center of said plate and extending downwardly therefrom and a coiled spring between the under side of said plate and the outer periphery of the lips of said suction cup.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,679,461 Worsching Aug. 7. 1928 FOREIGN PATENTS 493,201: Great Britain -o s, 1938

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1679461 *May 17, 1927Aug 7, 1928Richard WorschingAntislipping device for stands and the like
GB493201A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3332647 *Jun 22, 1965Jul 25, 1967Young Sheldon EAdjustable vibration isolator
US3463476 *Apr 18, 1966Aug 26, 1969Chem Products CorpVacuum chuck
US3494279 *Jun 24, 1968Feb 10, 1970Morrow Jack HSupport for use in strapping loads of multiple parts
US3584866 *May 27, 1968Jun 15, 1971Ropak Mfg CoMagnetic conveyor
US3770310 *Jun 21, 1972Nov 6, 1973Aquarius IncMethod and apparatus accommodating panel construction
US3823900 *Apr 20, 1972Jul 16, 1974Commercial De Materiel AeronauSuction security devices
US3863568 *Mar 27, 1972Feb 4, 1975Us NavySuction fastening device
US4126022 *May 26, 1977Nov 21, 1978Luis Bara MarcoLock construction for glass doors
US4269383 *Feb 23, 1979May 26, 1981The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavySuction cup with lateral gripper
US4294424 *Jul 16, 1979Oct 13, 1981Jacques TeissierSuction gripping device
US4421288 *Jan 19, 1981Dec 20, 1983Henry BlaszkowskiSuction cup
US4560216 *Nov 2, 1983Dec 24, 1985Yamaichi Electric Mfg. Co., Ltd.Connector with component removal means
US4770466 *Mar 24, 1987Sep 13, 1988St. John Manufacturing Company, Inc.Headrest
US4856766 *Mar 14, 1988Aug 15, 1989Philips & Du Pont Optical CompanyVacuum apparatus for holding workpieces
US4941635 *May 10, 1988Jul 17, 1990Lan Yung HueiCup-holder stabilizer
US5065973 *Dec 10, 1990Nov 19, 1991Wang Yeong JingSmooth surface fixing setter
US5192043 *Dec 11, 1991Mar 9, 1993Yen C FaMagnetic rubber suction disc
US5381990 *Nov 5, 1993Jan 17, 1995Belokin; PaulReleasable suction cup assembly
US5984401 *Aug 25, 1997Nov 16, 1999Hannah; James DavidPanel attachment member and system
US6244778Jan 21, 1999Jun 12, 2001Richard M. ChesbroughUniversal suction-based connection device
US6463644Apr 29, 1996Oct 15, 2002The Paslin CompanyTool for aligning vehicle fender on vehicle during assembly
US7527567 *May 10, 2007May 5, 2009Ohle Robert DDevice for attaching a soccer ball to a soccer kicking training apparatus
US8025169 *Sep 8, 2008Sep 27, 2011Israel Harry ZimmermanSelf-anchoring beverage container with directional release and attachment capability
US8028850 *Sep 22, 2007Oct 4, 2011Israel Harry ZimmermanSelf-anchoring beverage container with directional release and attachment capability
US8033517 *Jan 21, 2009Oct 11, 2011Wilcoxon Lori ALiquid holding device with releasable suction base
US8096537 *Sep 28, 2006Jan 17, 2012GM Global Technology Operations LLCActive material based suction cups
US8757418Nov 1, 2012Jun 24, 2014Israel Harry ZimmermanSelf-anchoring low-profile container anchor with directional release and attachment capability
US20110220767 *Mar 3, 2011Sep 15, 2011Stewart Anna MPedestal attachable to serving dish with suction cup
WO1996027087A1 *Feb 27, 1996Sep 6, 1996Dominique Louis CharpinSuction cup device
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/616, 269/21, 248/363, 248/362
International ClassificationB41J29/06, F16F1/44, F16B47/00
Cooperative ClassificationF16F1/445, B41J29/06, F16B47/00, F16F2236/045
European ClassificationB41J29/06, F16B47/00, F16F1/44B