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Publication numberUS2936591 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 17, 1960
Filing dateMar 14, 1958
Priority dateMar 14, 1958
Publication numberUS 2936591 A, US 2936591A, US-A-2936591, US2936591 A, US2936591A
InventorsEdward Leipert
Original AssigneeEdward Leipert
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vibration absorbing assembly for marine engines
US 2936591 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. LEIPERT iMay `17,- 1960 VIBRATICN ABSORBING ASSEMBLY FOR MARINE ENGINES Filed March 14. 1958 INVENTOR.

EDWARD LEIPERT ATTORNEY rUnited States Patent VIBRATION ABSORBING ASSEMBLY FOR MARINE ENGINES Edward Leipert, West Hampton Beach, N.Y. Application March 14, 1958, Serial No. 721,514 7 claims. (C1. 60-97) This invention relates to marine propulsion devices and specifically to resilient vibration land sound absorbing mountsfor said structures. This application is a continuation-in-part of an application led January 20, 1958, by Edward Leipert and given Serial No. 709,976.

Presently known inboard marine propulsion devices employing horizontally mounted engines have their motors secured directly to the hull of the boat. The motors are usually attached at four or more points to the boat. As a result, even though resilient mountings are employed, much of the vibration and noise generated in the engines and propulsion devices is transmitted to the boat with consequent unpleasant eiects.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a novel, single end mounted, motor support structure for horizontally disposed small marine engines which will simplify installations and eliminate, within the end mounting, the transmission of vibrations to the hull of the vessel.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide'a resilient mounting for the motor and drive section of a marine propulsion device which will insulate these parts from the supporting structure which is irmly fastened to the vessel.

A further object of the present invention is to balance and secure the motor units about the support section to eliminate bending stresses at the rubber mountings that would arise due to the weight of the overhanging motors.

Another object of the present invention is to support the motor units of the marine propulsion device in such a manner as to create substantially a shear stress only, on the rubber mountings.

A feature of the present invention is its resilient mounting means whereby the motor -section is joined to the drive section of the propulsion device and both are rubber isolated from the main supporting structure by the said resilient mounting.

Another feature of the present invention is the elimination of metal to metal contact between the main-supporting structure of the propulsion device and the engine with its propeller drive unit.

Still another feature of the present invention is the use of a truss bar to tie the engines together and form a structural member with the rigid gear housing as the lower member.

A further feature of the present invention is the use of a structurally rigid gear housing journaled into the rubber supported motor end mount to form a backbone upon which the engine and driving structures are secured.

The invention consists of the construction, combination and arrangements of parts, as herein illustrated, described and claimed.

In the accompanying drawing, forming a part hereof is illustrated one form of embodiment of the invention and in which: l

Figure l is a rear View partially cut away of a complete embodiment of the propulsion device showing the vibration absorbing mounts in accordance with the present invention.

Figure 2 is a sectional view taken on line 2-2 in Figure l, looking in the direction of the arrows.

Referring to the drawing, and particularly to Figures 1 and 2, 10 indicates the hull of the boat in which there is secured a rigid main support housing 11. The housing 11, which may be made of metal, is incorporated into the stern structure of the boat which is cut away to receive the said housing. The housing 11 is provided with side walls 12, a top wall 13, and a partial bottom wall member 14.

Opposed openings 15 are provided in the spaced side walls 12 and a plate 16 is bolted over each of the openings 15. The plates 16 are cut away as indicated at 17 to receive therethrough the bell housing 18 of the motors 19.

The portion of the bell housing 18 which is received within the opening 17 of the plate 16 is made in two parts 18, 37 (as shown in Figure l) for purposes of assembly. When the two parts of the bell housing 18, 37, are secured together, by the bonding therebetween of the resilient member 21 which is part of the vibration absorbing mounting assembly, they perform as a unitary structure. The vibration absorbing mounts 21 which may bo made of rubber, neoprene or the like, are carried on each side of the plate 16 adjacent the opening 17. The Vibration absorbing mounts 21 substantially fill the space between the bell housing 18 and the plate 16. The opening 17 in the plate 16 is of a diameter somewhat larger than the outside diameter of the bell housing member 37, where the bell housing member 37 extends through the opening 17. As a result of the difference in diameters, the bell housing members 18, 37, are carried within the opening 17 of the plate 16 without any metal to metal contact between the plate 16 and the housing 18 as indicated at 38 in Figure l.

A rigid gear housing structure 22 is journaled within each bell housing 18. The gear housing 22 is formed with opposed outwardly extending bearing members 23 which extend well within the bell housing 18 as indicated at 24. Because of the rigidity of the gear housing 22 and the length of bearing surface within the bell housing 18, the bearing members 23 of the gear housing 22 act as a backbone from which the motors 19 receive support. In addition, the bearings 23 serve to prevent, to a large extent, the tendency of the motors 19 to compress the lower portion of the vibration absorbing mounts 21 due to the overhanging weight of said motors since they are supported only at their inboard ends. By reducing the compression upon the vibration absorbing mounts 21, substantially only shear forces will be present on the said mounts, thereby causing them to operate at their greatest eiciency as vibration absorbing structures.

The gears 25, by means of which the propeller drive shaft 26 is rotated, are driven through a suitable coupling 27 which interconnects the motor 19 with the said gears 25.

The coupling 27 is carried within the motor bell housing 18 by a suitable support structure 28.

The drive gears 25 consist of spaced vertically disposed gears 29 which are in mesh with a horizontally disposed gear 30. The horizontal gear 30 is connected to the splined upper portion of the propeller drive shaft 26 as indicated at 31.

The outwardly extending bearing members 23 are carried, trunnion fashion, within the long bearing surfaces 24 ofthe bell housing 18 in the side walls 12 of the housing 11 and permit the entire propeller drive section gear housing 22 to swing upon the bearing surfaces. n this manner, the propeller gear housing and the propeller 32 can swing upwardly out of the path of an under water obstacle or object in order to prevent damage to the marine propulsion device.

Further vibration and shock absorbing properties are built into the structure herein disclosed by the use of a rubber lined thrust bearing 33 which is carried within the bottom plate 14 of the housing 1-1 adjacent the lower tubular housing 34 of the propeller drive section assembly.

The lower housing 34 may be rotated for steering by means of spur gear 35 without disturbing either the motors i9 or the gear housing 22.

As a further means of removing any bending forces from the vibration mounts 21, there is provided a truss bar 36, which interconnects both of the motors 19 and forms in eiect a truss there between. Where heavy motors are employed the truss 36 will substantially eliminate any tendency of the motors to sag on either side of .the propulsion device.

While the embodiment illustrated has shown two motors 19 disposed in opposed relationship with respect to the gear housing, it is within the purview of the present invention to employ only one motor and to mount other engine accessories such as a battery, gasoline tank, starting mechanism, etc., on the opposite side of the motor.

In the event that only a single motor is used, the accessories will be employed to balance the weight of the motor and the hereinabove described shear forces on the vibration mount will be achieved.

From the foregoing it will be seen that there has been provided a vibration and sound absorbing structure for a marine propulsion device in which the motors are disposed on either side of the propeller drive shaft and in which all vibration coming from the motors and the drive mechanism are insulated from the vessel to achieve quiet trouble free performance.

Having thus fully described the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent of the United States is: A l. A vibration absorbing assembly for an end mounted marine engine and propulsion device comprising, a rigidly secured main housing, side walls on said housing, opposed openings in the side walls of said main housing, a first and second resilient vibration absorbing member within said openings and secured therein, a motor for the propulsion device, an end bell housing on said motor, said motor end bell being bonded to the irst resilient member, whereby the motor is secured to the main housing solely through the first resilient member, a gear housing in the main housing, outwardly extending bearing mem bers on said gear housing extending through the main housing openings and means including the second resilient member to support the motor upon the said bearing members.

2. A vibration absorbing assembly foran end mounted marine engine and propulsion device comprising, a rigidly secured main housing, side walls on said housing, opposed openings in the side walls of said main housing, a resilient vibration absorbing member within each of said openings and secured thereto, spaced horizontally disposed motors for the propulsion device, an end bell housing on each of said motors, said motor end bells being bonded to the resilient member on each side of the housing, whereby each of the motors is secured to the main housing solely through the resilient member, a gear housing in the main housing, outwardly extending bearing members on said gear housing extending through the main housing openings, and means to support the motors upon the said bearing members.

3. A vibration absorbing assembly for an end mounted marine engine and propulsion device comprising, a rigidly secured main housing, side walls on said housing, opposed openings in the side walls of said main housing, a plate member overlying each of the openings and secured to the housing, an opening in each of the plate members, a resilient vibration absorbing member within each of said plate openings and secured on both sides of the plate adjacent thereto, spaced horizontally disposed motors for the propulsion device, an end bell Yhousing on each of said motors, said motor end bells being bonded to the resilient member on each side of the housing plates, whereby each of the motors is secured to the main housing solely through the resilient member, a gear housing in the main housing, outwardly extending bearing members on said gear housing extending through the main housing plate openings, and means to support the motors upon the said bearing members.

4. A vibration absorbing assembly for an end mounted marine engine and propulsion device comprising, a rigidly secured main housing, side walls on said housing, opposed openings in the side walls of said main housing, a resilient vibration absorbing member within each of said openings and secured thereto, spaced horizontally disposed motors for the propulsion device, an end bell housing on each of said motors, said motor end bells being bonded to the resilient member on each side of the housing, whereby each of the motors is secured to the main housing solely through the resilient member, a truss member interconnecting said motors above the gear housing, a gear housing in the main housing, outwardly extending bearing members on said gear housing extending through the main housing openings, and means to support the motors upon the said bearing members.

5. A vibration absorbing assembly for an end mounted marine engine and propulsion device comprising, a rigidly secured main housing, side walls on said housing, opposed openings in the side walls of said main housing, a plate member overlying each of the openings and secured to the housing, an opening in each of the plate members, a resilient vibration absorbing member within each of said plate openings and secured on both sides of the plate adjacent thereto, spaced horizontally disposed motors for the propulsion device, an end bell housing on each of said motors, said motor end bells being bonded to the resilient member on each side of the housing plates, whereby each of the motors is secured to the main housing solely through the resilient member, a truss member interconnecting said motors above the gear housing, a gear housing in the main housing, outwardly extending bearing members on said gear housing extending through the main housing plate openings, and means to support the motors upon the said bearing members.

6. A vibration absorbing assembly according to claim 2 in which the outwardly extending bearing members are journaled within the bell housings to permit the gear housing to swing Within the main housing without a metal to metal contact with said main housing, and support the opposed motors in horizontal alignment.

7. A vibration absorbing assembly for an end mounted marine engine and propulsion device comprising, a rigidly secured main housing, side walls on said housing, opposed openings in the side walls of said main housing, a plate member overlying each of the openings and secured to the housing, an opening in each of the plate members, a resilient vibration absorbingv member within each of said plate openings and secured on both sides of the plate adjacent thereto, spaced horizontally disposed motors for the propulsion device, an end bell housing on each of said motors, said motor end bells being bonded to the resilient member on each side of the housing plates, whereby each of the motors is secured to the main housing solely through the resilient member, a truss member interconnecting said motors above the gear housing, a gear housing in the main housing, outwardly extending bearing members on said gear housing extending through the main housing plate openings, and means including a bore in each bell housing into which the aforementioned gear housing bearing members extend so as to support the motors.

(References on following page) 6 References Cited in the le of this patent 2,229,153 Ware I an. 21, 1941 2,324,542 Schon July 20, 1943 UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,389,778 Feddm et a1. Nov. 27, 1945 1,076,416 Gammeter Oct. 21, 1913 2,504,988 Kronlund Apr. 25, 1950 1,899,490 Wiedmann Feb. 28, 1933 5 1,963,432 Baudot :une 19, 1934 FOREIGN PATENTS 2,046,558 Hussman July 7, 1936 256,151 Switzerland Feb. 16, 1949

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1076416 *Oct 21, 1913John R GammeterDriving mechanism.
US1899490 *Apr 2, 1932Feb 28, 1933Zahnradfabrik FriedrichshafenMechanism for driving propellers
US1963432 *Jan 22, 1932Jun 19, 1934Francois BaudotEngine set
US2046558 *Aug 22, 1931Jul 7, 1936United States Gypsum CoBoat construction
US2229153 *Dec 11, 1939Jan 21, 1941Packard Motor Car CoTransmission
US2324542 *Sep 14, 1942Jul 20, 1943Marmon Herrington Co IncDual transmission control
US2389778 *Jan 14, 1942Nov 27, 1945Bristol Aeroplane Co LtdPower plant for aircraft
US2504988 *Sep 4, 1945Apr 25, 1950Kronlund Raymond WInternal-combustion engine with demountable power units
CH256151A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3025823 *Dec 29, 1958Mar 20, 1962Tenney William LOutboard motor construction
US3083678 *Dec 30, 1959Apr 2, 1963Leipert EdwardMarine propulsion devices
US4111003 *May 17, 1977Sep 5, 1978Sundstrand CorporationHydraulic transmission drive assembly with noise attenuation means
US4583953 *Jun 6, 1985Apr 22, 1986Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki KaishaOutboard motor
US4686868 *Jun 5, 1986Aug 18, 1987Heidrich GuentherSoundproofed gear box
Classifications
U.S. Classification74/606.00R, 440/111, 181/207, 440/52, 244/34.00R
International ClassificationF16F1/38
Cooperative ClassificationF16F1/38
European ClassificationF16F1/38