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Publication numberUS2939306 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 7, 1960
Filing dateJun 2, 1958
Priority dateJun 2, 1958
Publication numberUS 2939306 A, US 2939306A, US-A-2939306, US2939306 A, US2939306A
InventorsTerhune Hugh D
Original AssigneeDu Pont
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Plaiting mechanism
US 2939306 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 7, 1960 H. D. TERHUNE 9,

PLAITING MECHANISM Filed June 2, 1958 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENT OR HUGH D. TERHUNE June 7, 1960 H. D. TERHUNE PLAITING MECHANISM 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 2, 1958 FIG. 2

INVENTOR HUGH s. TERHUNE June 7, 1960 H. D. TERHUNE 2,939,306

PLAITING MECHANISM Filed June 2, 1958 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 FIG. 40 F|G.4b

INVENTOR HUGH D. TERHUNE Unite States atent fiice 2,939,306 Patented June 7, 1960 PLAITING MECHANISM Hugh D. Terhune, Wilmington, Del., asslgnor to E. I. du Pont de Nemonrs and Company, Wilmington, Del., a corporation of Delaware Filed June 2, 1958, Ser. No. 739,363

3 Claims. (Cl. 68-178) The present invention relates to fabric conveying and storage equipment and more particularly it relates to improvements in an apparatus for forwarding and plaiting fabric adapted for use within a J-box.

In the continuous treatment of cloth or fabrics it is frequently necessary to store the fabric between treating operations under given temperature conditions. The fabric is conveniently drawn by a forwarding or draw reel into an enclosed chamber, the interior of which maintains the proper temperature conditions. The fabric is frequently plaited by a mechanism into folds, forming a packed mass, greatly reducing the rate of travel of the fabric through the storage chamber. In operation, the fabric, either in open-width or in rope form, enters the J-box and is stored at a high rate of speed. The stored mass, often wet with treating solution, moves slowing through the large storage chamber without objectionable tension or stress on the fabric.

The combined forwarding and plaiting apparatus should be designed to process fabric at a high rate of speed, in the neighborhood of 250-300 yd. per minute. When operating at high speeds, the design of the apparatus should eliminate malfunctions which could cause the clothto become fouled and entangled within the fabric moving mechanism, resulting in the loss of considerable time. Frequently, malfunctions are initiated by the momentary loss of cloth tension between the fabric moving mecham'sm and the folded fabric level in the J-box.

It is an object of the present invention to provide an apparatus which will forward and plait fabric at a high rate of speed.

It is another object of the present invention to provide an improved forwarding and plaiting apparatus which will smoothly draw and plait fabric at a high rate of speed with a minimum amount of malfunctions.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide a combined forwarding and plaiting apparatus which can be easily installed in a conventional J-box.

The above and other objects are accomplished by a novel design which prevents momentary loss of tension on the fabric while it is being conveyed to the plaiting wings and thereafter folded.

Referring to the drawings:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a J-box showing a fabric-treating apparatus for continuously processing and storing fabric.

Figure 2 is a partial sectional view taken along the lines 22 of the improved fabric-forwarding and plaiting mechanisms mounted in the bonnet of the J-box.

Figure 3 is a perspective view of the mechanism shown in Figure 2.

Figures 4a, b and c are side elevation views of the positional relationship of the plaiting wings to the forwarding roll in various stages of operation.

More particularly numeral 1 refers to a J-box having leg 2 with an entrance through which a continuous length of fabric 6 may be drawn up into the upper portion, referred to as bonnet 3, before being plaited down in storage bin 4 provided "with exit port 5.

The combined forwarding and plaiting mechanism located in bonnet 3 is shown in detail in Figures 2 and 3. Draw reel 7 is mounted on and rotated by axle 8 which is journaled through a pair of identical rotatable sleeves 9 positioned on each side of reel 7. Affixed to each of the sleeves 9 are a rockable arm 10 and a downwardly extending bar 11.

Plaiting wing 12 is connected to and moved by bafs 11 through support 13. Rotation of eccentric wheel 14 operates through drive shaft 15, pivoted to rocker arm 10, to rotate sleeves 9 clockwise or counter-clockwise through a limited arc which alternately raises and lowers plaiting wing 12. Since support 13 is nonrotatable with respect to bars 11, wing 12 oscillates back and forth in a reoccurring manner.

Adjustable lever means rockably connect second plaiting wing 20 to rockable arms 10 so that both plaiting wings are oscillated in unison. As shown in Figure 3, the lever means includes turnbuckles 17 which adjust the spaced relationship of pivot rods 16 and 18 pivoted to rockable arms 10 and rocker bars 19, respectively. The lower ends of rocker bars 19 rigidly retain pivot rod 21, the ends of which extend through and pivot in the side walls of bonnet 3 so that movement of drive shaft -15 rotates sleeves 9 and rocker bars 19 simultaneously, whereupon plaiting wings 12 and 20 are oscillated in unison.

In operation fabric 6 is drawn up through J-box leg 2 by draw reel 7, after which the fabric drops down into the storage bin 4. As the fabric leaves the draw reel, it

is plaited in the storage bin by the synchronized oscillation of wings 12 and 20. The fabric after being piled into a compact mass in the storagebin may then be' i removed through exit port 5 by means not shown.

As shown in Figure 2, the draw reel is positioned within the bonnet so that the reels periphery extends to the centers of the spaces within leg 2 and storage bin 4. The fabric is then drawn smoothly up to the leg and permitted to drop at a point midway between the sides fabric will fall free of contact with the wings when they are in the neutral position, best shown in Figure 4b. Figures 4a, 4b and 4c are views of the plating wings taken from the side opposite that of Figures 2 and 3.

The novel arrangement of the forwarding and plaiting mechanism disclosed herein prevents the fabric from accumulating on the surfaces of the plaiters when the latter are oscillatingf Figures 4a and 4c illustrate maximum limits of travel for the plaiting wings with respect to the draw reel. tacting surfaces of the plaiting wings, even at the extreme oscillating positions of the wings, present extremely steep angles to the direction of fabric travel which minimizes any tendency of the traveling fabric to lose tension. If the fabric becomes slack, it may throw over the rapidly moving reel and become entangled.

The steep angle of the plaiting wings is made possible by using a common axis, .axleii, for both draw reel 7 and plaiting wing 12, thereby permitting the upper edge of the wing to be positioned closely adjacent to the draw reel, with its arc of travel below the point where the fabric drops off the reel. The top edge of the plaiting wing may have a doctor blade 25 bearing lightly on the surface of the reel. The axis of rotation of pivot rod 21, which holds plaiting wing 20, is at the same level as axle 8.

Heretofore, plaiting wings have been placed below the draw reel and oscillated on an axis below the reel. Unfortunately, rapidly moving fabric momentarily loses It is to be noted that the fabric con-' tension after leaving the reel in suchconstructions since the oscillating wings must: move to extreme limits of travel to properly plait the fabric. Extreme oscillation of the wings results in positioning'the wings relatively horizontal whereupon the slack induced to the moving fabriccauses it to overthrow the plaiting wing or become tangled and wrapped up on. the draw reel itself.

The-momentary slackness in the cloth between the plaiting wing and the draw reel is causedby the failureof the wet fabric to fall freelyand continuously into the storage bin by reason of the interruption of the flow of the fabric when the plaiting wings are at the. maximum limits of travel. At this point, the .angle oftheplaiter wing-fabric incidence is sufliciently high to 'permiLa small amount of fabric to pile on the wing.

The combined forwarding and plaiting mechanism prevents any pile-upby positioning the plaiting'wings with respect'tothe draw reel so that a minimum of .contact between the wings and the traveling fabric takes place.

Referring to Figure 3, it is to be-noted that little 'oppor-.

tunity for fabric throw-over or other malfunctioning exists.

V iEccentric wheel 14 is rotated by means which synchronizes its rate of rotation with that of axle 8. The

means shown includes a diife'rential belt driven pulley arrangement betweenshaftj23 and axle 8. Pulley 26 is drivably connected to pulley 24 by belt 25v so that the rate of plaiting will be coordinated with the amount of fabric forwarded to the storage bin by reel 7. The

plaiting wings oscillate in unison at a rate s'utficient to evenly lap the folds of the forwarded fabric against the sides of the storage bin. Additional means of syn-'' chronizing the oscillation of the plaiting wings with the fabric forwarded will suggest themselves to the skilled mechanic. V Y 7 Sprocket22 is driven by any suitable means (not shown) and may be replaced by a pulley adapted to be driven by a belt. Many modifications may be made,

such as the provision of a duplicate-eccentric wheel 14' and drive shaft 15 to each of'the rockable arms and a second sprocket similarto 22 may also be mounted on axle 8 on the other side of reel 7. V

In addition, means for heating the fabric within the J-box may be provided. In my copending U.S. application Serial No. 538,574, filed October 5, 1955, now U.S. Patent No. 2,858,184, issued October 28, 1958, means for passing steam into the free space of the bonnet are disclosed. Such means include a steam inlet with 'distributor and bathe that admits steam above the plaited .fabric seal in the storage bin and a temperature control bulb near the fabric entrance in the J-box leg.

Other features of the above-referred-to copending ap- V plication may be employed in a J-box together with the present invention, such as the inclusion of means for' oscillating and traversing a pot eye to distributefabric m rope form with the fabric entrance and exit port in circularor oblong shape as shown in that application.

Referring again to Figure 3, turnbuckles 17 'are provided to permit adjustment of the spaced relationship of V the plaiting wings by altering the angle of suspension of both plaiting wings. In neutral position the. wings should be adjusted to approximate the arrangement shown in Figure 4b so that fabric moving in the direction of the rotation of reel 7 will fall betweenthe wings without contact. a

' The essential features of the present invention consist in the mechanism located in the bonnet as shown'in the drawings. The arrangement of the forwarding and plaiti for use in a treating and storage J-box wherein fabric is forwarded and plaited at high rates of speed.

The embodiments of the invention in; which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

1. In an apparatus for theforwarding'and plaiting of fabric downwardly into the storage bin of aJ-box, a draw reel mounted on an axle in the bonnet of said J- box, means for rotating said axle and said reel to forward a fabric into the approximate center of said bin, said axle being journaled through a pair of sleeves located on opposite sides of said reel, a rockable arm and a downwardly extending bar affixed to each of said sleeves, a plaiting wing rigidly connected to the lower extremity of said bars'through a support, a second plaiting wing rotatably mounted in said bonnet adjacent said first plaiting wing, the axis of rotation of said second plaiting wing'being atthezsainejlevel as said axle,'.leve-r means rockablyl-connecting,said'second plaiting wing to said arms, nieans'fo'r oscillatingsaid wings'in'unison to receive thedownwardly moving fabric and to plait said fabric within .saidbin, and means for synchronizing the rate. ofoscillationiwiththe speed of rotation ofsaid reel.

2. In agpsrams'irer the :forwarding and plaiting of fabric downwardly into the storage bin of a Jabox, a draw reel mounted onan axle in the bonnet of said .J-

box, means for rotating said axle and said reel to for-.

ward a fabric into the approximate center of said bin, said axle'being journaled through a pair of sleeves located on opposite sides of said reel, a rockable arm and a downwardly extending bar affixed to each of said-sleeves,

a plaitinglwin'g, rigidly connected to' the lower extremity of said: bars-through a support, the upper'edge of said,

plaiting wing beingjuxtaposed with the periphery of said reel,-a secondplaiting wing rotatably mounted in said bonnetadjacent said first plaiting'wing, the axis of rotation of said second plaiting wing being at the same level as said axle, lever means rockably connecting said second plaiting wing to said arms, means for oscillating said wings in unison to receive the downwardly moving fabric and to plait said fabric within said bins, and means for synchronizing the rate of oscillation with ,the speed ofrotation-of said ,reel.

3. A textile treating and storage J-box having an improved fa'bric conveyor and-.plaiter comprising a draw' reel mounted on an axle in the bonnet of said J-box, means for rotating said'axleiand saidreel, said axle beingrjournaled through a;pair ofisleeves locatedon opposite sides of said reel, a rockable armaand a downwardly extending bar affixed to each of-said sleeves, a plaiting wing ,rigidly connected to the lower extremity of said bars through'a support, a' second plaiting wing rotatably mounted in said bonnet adjacent saidfirst plaiting wing, the axis of rotation of said second-plaiting wing being atthe same level as said axle, lever'rneans rockably connecting said second plaiting wing to'said'arms, turnbuckle means for adjusting the spaced relationship of said plaiting wings, means for oscillating said wings in unison, and means for synchronizing the rate of oscillation with the speedof rotation of said reel. I

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,579,563 Gallinger Dec.12 5, 1951 2,691,523 Jesperson Oct. 12, 1954 Rowe Mar/4; 1958

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2579563 *Oct 18, 1947Dec 25, 1951Du PontFabric conveying apparatus
US2691523 *Mar 10, 1950Oct 12, 1954American Linen Supply CoUnwinding and folding machine
US2825556 *Sep 1, 1954Mar 4, 1958Du PontOpen-width fabric piling apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3377825 *Oct 14, 1965Apr 16, 1968Kenzo IwamotoLiquid treating apparatus for a cotton belt
Classifications
U.S. Classification68/178, 493/414
International ClassificationD06B17/00, D06B17/02
Cooperative ClassificationD06B17/02
European ClassificationD06B17/02