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Publication numberUS2939454 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 7, 1960
Filing dateAug 27, 1957
Priority dateAug 27, 1957
Publication numberUS 2939454 A, US 2939454A, US-A-2939454, US2939454 A, US2939454A
InventorsDavid L Lichtenstein, Buncher Earl, Ernest P Fedorka
Original AssigneeMiracle Sage Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Therapeutic unit
US 2939454 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 7, 1960 D. LICHTENSTEIN ET AL 2,939,454

THERAPEUTIC UNIT 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Aug. 27, 1957 i 2 m2 sew NQN E E v Q LwE mm fi VA w 5 ATTQZNEYS June 7, 1960 D. LICHTENSTEINV ETAL 2,939,454

THERAPEUTIC UNIT 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 27, 1957 o I 7 7 QwM 1 6 Q m M M.

PQWEE Eva-5 INVENTORS DAVID L. LlCHTENSTE-(N;

ERNEST P. ceocnzmm BY EARL BONCHEE ATTQRN EYS United States Patent rrmnarnorrc UNIT David L. Lichtenstein, McKeesport, Earl Buncher,,P ittS burgh, and Ernest P. Fedorka,',Elizabeth, Pa., assignors to Miracle-Sage Corporation, a corporation of Pennsylvania Z Filed Aug. 27, 1951, Ser. No. 680,486'

1 Claims. (Cl.-128 -33).

This invention appertains to improvements in therapeutic units which are used for-stimulating the flow of blood and relaxing tired muscles in the human body and for exercising the body to strengthen the muscles and the nervous. system and to alleviate circulatory disturbances.

An important object of the present invention is to provide a portable unit, having the above purposes and advantages, which maybe easily transported and used on a chair seat or back or as a foot rest.

A further important object of the present invention is to provide an extremely rigid, durable and effective vibratory therapeutic unit, which is made of a size that can be easily transported and can be used by a person while in a sitting or reclining position. v

A further important object of the present invention is to provide a vibratory therapeutic unit, which is in the nature of a cushion, and which is formed with'a vibration creating means and a vibration transmitting means, that is so arranged and disposed that vibratory impulses are evenly transmitted throughout the entire unit in a positive and firm manner so that the entire unit will impart vibratory impulses of the same even and firm intensity, throughout its entire width and length, to the portion of the body of the person engaging the unit.

Another important object of the present invention is to provide a therapeutic vibratory unit, which includes a body that is tapered from one end to its other end in a manner so that it can be disposed against the back of a chair and can be engaged by the back of a person in a comfortable and restful position.

A further important object of the present invention is to provide a therapeutic vibratory unit, which essentially comprises a body including opposing rigid side frame members and having opposing ends, one of the ends hav ing a cylindrical housing disposed transversely thereof and within which a vibration creating means is operatively mounted, the vibrations from such means being transmitted by the side frames, which also provide a rigid support for the unit and prevent the unit from becoming deformed out of shape, due to pressure of the body or due to accidental means.

A further important object of the present invention, consonant with the foregoing object, resides in the provision of cross bars between the side frames, such cross bars being disposed adjacent the ends of the body, and serving as supports for coil springs, which extend longitudinally between the ends of the body and are disposed adjacent the front wall thereof, so that the front wall of the unit evenly transmits the vibratory impulses, while the rest of the unit is not subjected to undue vibrations.

The foregoing and ancillary objects, including the provision of a compact, exceptionally sturdy, effective and dependable therapeutic vibratory unit, are attained by this invention, the preferred embodiment of which is set forth in the following description and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure 1 is a side elevational view of the therapeutic unit of this invention, showing the 'same in one manner we 7 1C of use, wherein the unit is seated against the back of a chair, with the user having his back resting against the front of the unit; 7

Figure 2 is a view in perspective of the therapeuti unit, with portions thereof broken away to illustrate the interior construction and particularly to illustrate the means for transmitting the vibratory impulses evenly and firmly throughout the unit;

Figure 3 is a longitudinal sectional view taken on line 3-3 of Figure 2'; and

Figure 4 is a longitudinal sectional view taken on line 4-4 of Figure 3.

Referring now more particularly to the accompanying drawings, the therapeutic vibratory unit 10 includes a pair of opposing rigid side frame members 12 and 14,

which are interconnected and held apart in spaced relation by cross rods 16 and 18. As shown particularly in Figure 4, each of the side frame members includes a straight rod 20, which is formed integral at its ends with semicircular end portions 22 and 24, that are formed integral with an inclined rod 26, which extends inwardly from the end 24 to the end 22. The end portion 24 constitutes the major end, while the end portion 22 constitutes the minor end. 1 Thus, the side frame members are formed from a one-piece rod, which is of a substantially looped configuration, having a semicircular major end 24, which is larger in size, and a semicircular minor end 22. The rod 20 constitutes the back of theside frame members, while the rod 26 constitutes the front thereof, as will be more fully described. The interconnecting and rigidifying cross rods 16 and 18 are disposed between the side frame members 12 and 14 adjacent the major and the minor ends 24 and 22, respectively. Suitable bracing rods 28 are provided between the rod sections 20 and 26 and extend from their ends, which are disposed substantially adjacent the cross rods 16 and 18, to a point intermediate the length of the front rod section 26, as shown in Figure 4.

The side frame members 12 and 14 and their asso ciated bracing and cross rods 16 and 18 constitute a frame or a body, which is also composed of a flexible covering 30, that encircles the end portions and also overlies the side frames so as to substantially completely close the side frames and provide a chamber 32. The covering 30 may be formed from any suitable material, such as plastic, fabric or the like and constitutes the exterior of the unit.

A cylindrical housing or casing 34 is transversely disposed at the major end of the, body and is secured at its ends within the major'end portions 24 of the side frame members, as shown in Figure 2. The opposing ends of the housing 34 are provided with end walls 36 and 38, which are centrally apertured, as at 40, to ventilate the housing to the atmosphere. It is to be noted that the covering 30 substantially overlies the end plates 36 and 38, except for openings 42 formed in the covering in alignment with the apertures 40 for ventilation purposes.

A ring or collar 44, which is preferably formed from wood or similar material, is fixed by screws 46 concentrically within the housing 34 and, preferably, adjacent the center thereof. An electric motor 48, which is of conventional construction and operation, is securely held within the ring 44 and is provided on its armature shaft 50 with an eccentric weight 52, which constitutes a source of vibratory impulses. The motor is energized from a suitable power source through the medium .of conductors 54, which are passed through the aperture and the end plate 38. (For the purpose of controlling the magnitude of the vibratory impulses, a rheostat 56 is provided and is operatively connected in the conduc tors 54 in order to control thespeed of the motor 48;

The outer peripheral portion of the cylindrical casing" or housing '34 is encased or enclosed by a semicircular pad '58,which 'ispreferably formed of multi-cellular resilient material and the covering 30 encircles or envelops the pad 58, as shown in Figure ,4. In suitable fashion, a semicireiilarpad er) of material similar to the pad 58 isprovided to definethe'ininor 'end of "the body and is disposed around the end portion 22 of the side frame members.

i .A web-likerein'forcingsheet '62 of suitable material is secured to the rear ro'd "sections 20 of "the side frame members and extends longitudinally and transversely thereof from the housing 34 upto the center 'of the minor end portions 22 of the side frame members. The reinforcing sheet 62 is disposed parallel with and substantially adjacent 'tothe backwall '64-'o'f the covering 30.

It can be seen that, when the motor 48 is energized, the eccentric weight 52 set up vibratory impulses, which aretransmitted to the housing 34 to the rigid side frame members 12 and 14 and by such side frame members are transmitted throughout the unit. To assist in the transmission of the vibrations, coil springs 66 are provided and the springs are disposed and arranged so that they extend in parallel and trean'sversely spaced relationship longitudinally of the unit.

The opposiug'ends of'thecoil springs are anchored on bars '68 and 70 which extend transversely of the side frame members and are suitably secured to the front rod sections 26 thereof. Ihe cross bars 68 and 70 are disposed transversely of the body at the opposing ends thereofand'are spaced inwardly 'from'the ends, as shown in .Figure 4. .A resilient pad '72 overlies the coil springs and .is interposed between the springs and the front wall 74 of the cover 30. "The opposing ends of the pad are suitablysecured to the outer faces of the cross bars '68 and 70.

For thermal purposes, a heating element, which may be in the nature of a heating coil 76, is disposed within the chamber, which is defined by the rear and front walls, 64 and 74, respectively, of the cover. The heating element is energized by conductors '78, which are provided with a suitable switch means 80, as 'shown'in Figure 2.

In one use of thetherapeu'tic unit, as shown in Figure 1, the unit is disposed against the back 82 of a conventional chair and is arranged so that the major end thereof rests on the seat of the chair, with the minor end extending upwardly. The unit, in such environmental use, has its straight back wall 64 resting against'the back 82 of the chair with its front wall inclined upwardly and inwardly so as to provide a very restful and comfortable support for the back'of a user. The vibrations created by the eccentric weight 52 are transmitted through the housing 54 to the side frame members and to the springs 66, which evenly and firmly transmit the vibrations throughout the unit and particularly over the front wall 74 thereof so as to impart a very uniform, firm but gentle vibration to the back of the body of the user, thereby imparting a soothing relaxing effect upon the body. The desired rate of vibratory oscillation may be adjusted by means of the rheostat 56 and the switch 80 may be used to control the heating element 76.

It is to be particularly noted that the side frame members and associated interconnection and bracing constitute a body, which is also composed of the covering 30. The body is shaped so that it has a major and a minor end, being composed of a straight back wall and a front wall which is inclined inwardly from the major end to the minor end. This particular shape is of importance, as shown in Figure l, in providing a very restful support for a user, particularly when the unit is used when aper'son is in a seated position on a chair.

The unit may also be used when a person is in a reclining position and, in such instance, the major end will provide a pillow and will permit the body of the user to be reclined in a very restful and well-supported position. Inihe latter respect, the side frames will give the desired rigidity to the unit so as to provide a very firm support for "the "body 'of the user. The side frame members also prevent the accidental deformation of the unit which could Well occur, if the unit were of a supple cushion type.

It can thus be seen that the therapeutic units or vibrator can be easily and elfedtiv'el'y used for stimulating the flow of blood and --relaxing the tired muscles in the human body and for exercising the body to strengthen the musclesin' the nervous system and may be also effectively used'in conjunction w ith re'ducing exercises or treatments to effect aiessin weight.

While the preferred embodiment and environmental "use of the. therapeutic unit has been-described and illustrated herein, other forms and environmental uses may be realized as come "within dhe scope and spirit of the appended claims.

Having thus described this invention, what is claimed is:

1. A therapeutic unit com rising a body having a straight back wall 'and semicircular ends and a front wall inclined inwardly irom'one end to the other end and including substantially triangular open, rigid side frame members, a cylindrical housin transversely mounted in and extending across the one end, vibration creating means operatively mounted "in the housing, cross bar's Secured between the side frame members adjacent the 'ends, coil springs extending longitudinally of the body and having ends anchored tothe cross bars, said body being composed of a flexible "covering member forming a chamber within which the 'spr'ings are disposed, said flexible covering member enclosing the housing and the side frame members and said ends being defined by sctnicircular r'esilient pads enclosed by the flexible member and one o'f sai'd pads enclosing the outer peripheral portion of the housing, and said springs and cross bars being coplanar and lying adjacent the front wall and a resilient pad overlying the springs and interposed between the front wall and the springs.

2. A therapeutic unit comprising a body having a straight back wall and semicircular ends and a front wall inclined inwardly from one end to the other end and including substantially triangular open, rigid side frame members, a cylindrical housing transversely mounted in the one end, vibration creating means operativ'elymountd in and extending across the housing, c'r'oss bars secured between the side frame members adjacentthe ends, coil springs extending longitudinally of the body and having ends anchored to the cross bars, said body being composed of a flexible coverihg'inember forming a chamber within which the springs are disposed, said flexible covering member enclosing the housing and the side frame members and said ends being defined 'by semicircular resilient pads enclosed by the flexible covering member and one'of said pads enclosing the outer peripheral portion of the housing, and said springs and cross bars being coplanar and lying adjacent the front wall, and reinforcing means extending between the side frame members adjacent the back Wall of the body.

3. A therapeutic unit comprising a pair of substantially rigid, open triangular side frames disposed in spaced, parallelrelationship, each of said frames having a rounded major end and a rounded minor end, said ends of each frame being connected by straight rear bars and diagonally extending front bars that slope from the major end to the minor end, transverse bars connecting the side frames and secured to the front bars adjacent the ends of theframes, coil springs connected at their opposing ends to the transverse bars and arranged in parallel, transverse] y spaced relation and forming a resilientfront wall,- a cylindrical housing mounted between and fitted in the inner surfaces of the major ends of the names, vibration creating means operatively mounted in the housing, and a flexible covering, enclosing the frames and overlying the resilient front wall'and forminga rearwall.

4. A therapeutic unit comprising a pair of substantially rigid, open triangular side frames disposed in spaced, parallel relationship, each of said frames having a rounded major end and a rounded minor end, said ends of each frame being connnected by straight rear bars and diagonally extending front bars that slope from the major end to the minor end, transverse bars connecting the side frames and secured to' the front bars adjacent the ends of the frames, coil springs connected at their opposing ends to the transverse bars and arranged in parallel, transversely spaced relation and forming a resilient front wall, a cylindrical housing mounted between and fitted in the inner surfaces of the major ends of the frames, vibration creating means operatively mounted in the housing, and a flexible covering enclosing the frames and overlying the resilient front wall and forming a rear wall,

and a reinforcing sheet connected between the straight rear bars of the frames and forming a rear wall for the housing, with the covering overlying the reinforcing sheet.

5. A therapeutic unit comprising a pair of substantially rigid, open triangular side frames disposed in spaced, parallel relationship, each of said frames having a rounded major end and a rounded minor end, said ends of each frame being connected by straight rear bars and diagonally extending front bars that slope from the major end to the minor end, transverse bars connecting the side frames and secured to the front bars adjacent the ends of the frames, coil springs connected at their opposing ends to the transverse bars and arranged in parallel, transversely spaced relation and forming a resilient front wall, a cylindrical housing mounted between and fittedin the inner surfaces of the major ends of the frames, vibration creating means operatively mounted in the housing, and a flexible covering enclosing the frames .and overlying the resilient front wall and forming a rear wall, each of said frames being composed of a one-piece, rod member and brace means being provided between the front and rear bars of each of the frames.

6. A therapeutic unit comprising a pair of side frame members disposed in spaced apart, parallel relationship, each of said frame members having a front bar and a rear bar and opposing ends, cross bars connecting the frame members and secured to the front bars adjacent the ends, coil springs extending between the cross bars and disposed in parallel spaced relationship and defining a resilient front wall, means connecting the rear bars of the frame members, a vibrating means operatively mounted between adjoining ends of the frame members and a fabric type covering enclosing the frame members, ends and front and rear walls.

7. A therapeutic unit comprising a pair of side frame members disposed in spaced apart, parallel relationship,

reach of said frame members having a front bar and a rear bar and opposing ends, cross bars connecting the frame members and secured to the front bars adjacent the ends, coil springs extending between the cross bars and disposed in parallel spaced relationship and defining a resilient front wall, means connecting the rear bars of the frame members, a vibrating means operatively mounted between adjoining ends of the frame members and a fabric type covering enclosing the frame members, ends and front and rear walls, and a thin resilient pad interposed between the covering and the coil springs.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,222,175 Bobrick Apr. 10, 1917 2,425,655 Tomkins Aug. 12, 1947 2,800,897 Ross July 30, 19,57 2,833,276 Murphy May 6, 1958

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1222175 *Apr 28, 1916Apr 10, 1917Mayo A BobrickAuxiliary seat-back.
US2425655 *Mar 22, 1944Aug 12, 1947Edwin H TompkinsTherapeutic device
US2800897 *Jul 23, 1953Jul 30, 1957John H RossPillow with vibratory and heating means
US2833276 *Aug 17, 1954May 6, 1958Owen K MurphyMotor operated kinesitherapy device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4006739 *Nov 7, 1975Feb 8, 1977Wahl Clipper CorporationBack massager
US4174708 *Oct 31, 1977Nov 20, 1979Coffin Harry ABack massager
US4592345 *Dec 14, 1983Jun 3, 1986Wahl Clipper CorporationBack massager structure
US5286046 *Nov 25, 1991Feb 15, 1994Homecrest Industries IncorporatedGeriatric chair
US6256818 *Sep 24, 1999Jul 10, 2001Angela Y. HughesHeated massage pillow
Classifications
U.S. Classification601/57, 5/653, 5/915, 5/421
International ClassificationA61H23/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61H2201/0207, A61H2201/0149, A61H2201/0228, A61H23/0263, Y10S5/915, A61H2205/081
European ClassificationA61H23/02R2