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Publication numberUS2940183 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 14, 1960
Filing dateOct 18, 1957
Priority dateOct 18, 1957
Publication numberUS 2940183 A, US 2940183A, US-A-2940183, US2940183 A, US2940183A
InventorsFromberg Aaron J
Original AssigneeFromberg Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Key rack with gauge
US 2940183 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 14, 1960 A. J. FROMBERG 2,940,183

KEY RACK mm GAUGE Filed 001:. 1a. 1957 W1 i //////4 i; {EA-75W INVENTOR.

ATTORNEYS 2,940,183 Ice Patented June 14, 1960 KEY RACK WITH GAUGE Aaron J. Fromherg, Lebec, CaliL, nssignor to Fromberg, Inc, Bakersfield, Calif., a corporation of California Filed Oct. 18, 1957, Ser. No. 691,104

1 Claim. (Cl. 35-50) This invention relates to a keyboard, and more particularly to a gauge device for a keyboard.

The object of the invention is to provide a keyboard which is adapted to be used for Supporting a plurality of key blanks, and wherein the keyboard is provided with a plurality of slots or holes, the slots conforming in configuration or contour to the adjacent key blanks which are supported.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a keyboard which is adapted to be used for supporting a plurality of key blanks, and wherein the key blanks are arranged in groups according to their particular configuration, the keyboard of the present invention being provided with a plurality of slots, the slots being arranged adjacent to the key blanks, and wherein the slots conform in configuration to the adjacent key blanks, so that when a person wishes a duplicate key made from a key blank, then the duplicate key can be inserted in one of the slots so as to make sure that the key fits in the particular slot, and this has the practical effect of insuring that the proper shape or size of key blank will be used when making the duplicate key.

A further object of the invention is to provide a keyboard or support member which is extremely simple and inexpensive to manufacture.

Other objects and advantages will be apparent during the course of the following description.

In the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this application, and in which like numerals are used to designate like parts throughout the same:

Figure 1 is a fragmentary front elevational view illustrating the key supporting board of the present invention. I

Figure 2 is a sectional view taken on the line 2-2 of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a sectional view taken on the line 3-3 of Figure 2.

Referring in detail to the drawings, the numeral 10 indicates a board or support member which is adapted to be used for supporting a plurality of key blanks such as the key blanks 15. The board 10 is adapted to be secured to a supporting structure 11 which may be a wall or the like, and the board 10 is connected to the supporting structure 11 through the medium of securing elements such as the screws 12. Spacer washers 13 are adapted to be interposed or positioned between the board 10 and the supporting structure 11.

Extending outwardly from the board 10 and secured thereto is a plurality of pegs 14, and the pegs 14 serve to support the key blanks 15 from which duplicate keys are adapted to be made. It is to be noted from the drawings, that the key blanks 15 are arranged in groups, so that each group is adapted to consist of key blanks of a particular configuration or contour. Thus, the key blanks in one group difier in configuration from the key blanks in another group.

Arranged above each of the pegs 14 is a slot or hole 16, and as shown in Figure 1 for example, the slots 16 conform in configuration to the 'key blanks 15 which are supported therebelow. In Figure 3, the numeral '17 indicates in broken lines a key which is adapted to be inserted in a particular slot 16, as for example, when a person is getting a duplicate key made to correspond to the key 17. By inserting the key 17 into the slot 16, the key maker can readily ascertain whether or not the proper key blank 15 is being used for making the duplicate key, since the key slots 16 correspond in cross sectional configuration to the key blanks 15 supported therebelow or contiguous thereto.

From the foregoing, it is apparent that there has been provided a board which is adapted to be used for holding key blanks so that there will be less likelihood of a duplicate key being made from the wrong key blank. As shown in Figure 1, a plurality of key blanks 15 are adapted to be supported on the pegs 14 which extend outwardly from the board 10, and the blanks 15 are arranged in groups as shown in Figure 2 for example, and the key blanks in each group have difierent configurations or cross section from each other. Arranged above each of the pegs 14 is a slot 16, and the slots 16 have the same cross section or contour as the cross section of the key blanks 15 supported therebelow. Thus, when a person wishes a duplicate key made, he merely hands the key to be duplicated to the key maker, and such a key is indicated by the numeral 17 in broken lines in Figure 3. The key 17 to be duplicated is then inserted into the slots 16, and when the proper slot 16 is found which conforms to the key 17, then the key maker knows that the proper size or shape of key blank 15 is therebelow. Thus, the possibility of making the duplicate key from the wrong key blank is eliminated.

The parts can be made of any suitable material and in different shapes or sizes.

Thus, it will be seen that there has been provided aboard for use in making duplicate keys. Over each peg 14 on which duplicate key blanks 15 are placed to be ground out by the maker of duplicate keys, is placed or arranged a slot 16 in which the particular duplicate key blank will fit. The purpose of this slot 16 is as previously stated. Thus, due to the multiplicity of keys, the key maker in the past has often made keys from blanks which would not fit into the keyhole. With the keyhole blank, 21 person who has the key which he wants duplicated, would hand the key to the person who is to make the key. The key maker then fits the key such as the key 17 into the slot 16 before taking the blank 15 from the peg 14 underneath the slot 16. In that way, when the customer obtained the new key to duplicate the one which he was using as a model, it will always fit into the keyhole.

I claim:

A duplicate key gauge comprising a body member adapted to be arranged contiguous to a supporting structure, securing elements for connecting said body member to said supporting structure, said body member defining a board for supporting key blanks, spacer members adapted to be interposed between said board and supporting structure, a plurality of pegs extending outwardly from said board and secured thereto, the free ends of the pegs being curved upwardly so as to help prevent accidental separation of the key blanks from the pegs, the other ends of the pegs being of reduced size and being secured to the board, said pegs adapted to be received in apertures in said key blanks, each peg adapted to receive a group of key blanks of a particular configuration and wherein the key blanks in one group differ in configuration from the key blanks in another group, there being a plurality of aligned slots in said board, each of said slots being above, near to and aligned with onc of saidpegs, each of said slots having a configuration which the key slotscorrespond in cross-section or configuration with the adjacent key blanks; V 1 r Reference in the file of a pm:

" UNITED STATES PATENTS Jacobs. Dec. 29, 1891 Stanford Jan. 7, 1921 'Barwood Mar. 13, 1934 Mount Sept. 5, 1939

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US466044 *Mar 3, 1891Dec 29, 1891 Maurice jacobs
US1380747 *Nov 22, 1920Jun 7, 1921Malcolm MacaulayHook-rack
US1950469 *May 16, 1931Mar 13, 1934Leon J BarwoodWasher display gauge
US2172172 *Nov 19, 1936Sep 5, 1939Bassick CoDisplay stand for furniture casters, slides, or the like
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3264462 *Sep 15, 1964Aug 2, 1966Independent Lock CoKey display device
US3322270 *May 5, 1966May 30, 1967Independent Lock CoKey merchandising assembly and key blank therefor
US3718260 *Jan 29, 1971Feb 27, 1973S SharpDisplay device
US4150673 *Feb 3, 1977Apr 24, 1979Pharmachem CorporationCoded entry system for blood bag
US5351409 *Dec 16, 1992Oct 4, 1994Axxess Entry TechnologiesKey identifier method and apparatus
US8215625 *Jun 27, 2008Jul 10, 2012Wu Kuo-ShenKey blank selector
US20090001645 *Jun 27, 2008Jan 1, 2009Wu Kuo-ShenKey blank selector
US20130099641 *Oct 25, 2011Apr 25, 20136251374 Canada Inc.Lockout Cabinet
Classifications
U.S. Classification33/539, 211/85.9, 70/460, 40/657
International ClassificationA47G29/10, A47G29/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47G29/10
European ClassificationA47G29/10