Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2940641 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 14, 1960
Filing dateMar 10, 1958
Priority dateMar 10, 1958
Publication numberUS 2940641 A, US 2940641A, US-A-2940641, US2940641 A, US2940641A
InventorsNorrish Kenneth A, White John C
Original AssigneeBridgeport Metal Goods Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid spray dispenser
US 2940641 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 14, 1960 K. A, NORRlsH Erm. 2,940,641

LIQUID SPRAY DISPENSER Filed March lO, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 ATTORNEYS June 14, 1960 K. A, NoRRlsH ETAL 2,940,641

LIQUID SPRAY DISPENSER 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 10. 1958 FIGS FIG.7

INVENTORS.

.n s .m om Nh AW ...mC e nn n .n e0 KJ 62mm, (gpm-5ml ATTORNEYS LIQUID YSPRAY DISPENSER Kenneth A. 'Norrish and John C. White, Bridgeport, Conn., assignors to The Bridgeport Metal Goods Mfg. Co., Bridgeport, Conn., a corporation of Connecticut Filed Mar. 10, 1958,'Ser. No. 720,385

7 Claims. (Cl. 222-183) The present invention relates to a permanent casing for dispensable, valve-operated, pressure-tight containers, and more particularly `to a telescoping casing adapted to operate the container enclosed therein. This .application is a continuation-in-part of a copending application of Kenneth A. Norrish and John -C. White, Serial No. 700,- 875, tiled December 5, 1957.

The present invention has particular utility in the application, as a spray, of perfumes and the like. This method of application is not new and in fact has been widely 'accepted as superior technique. However, the spray devices or atomizers heretofore employed have impeded'its widespread usage.

Spray devices of the conventional vtype employ a dip stick arranged a bottle containing a liquid perfume preparation. The liquid is forced up into the dip stick by means of a squeeze bulb or plunger element, and out a nozzle as a vnely distributed mist. This device is 4relatively bulky, and subject to leakage unless maintained in an upright position. Therefore, for all practical purposes, its usage :is limited to the home. Even there ,fit has found little favor due primarily to the need forrelling the bottle with the liquid preparation. Such operation is at best quite messy resulting in the spreading of a lasting aroma to the immediate area, including Vthe person, and further aggravated by the danger of spilling the expensive liquid.

Accordingly, it is one of the objects of the .present .invention to provide a spray dispenser for perfumes and the ,like having none of the above-enumerated disadvantages. To :this end the invention prescribes the use of a valve-operated, pressure-tight container similar to theconventional aerosol container, for example. This container may be filled with a liquid perfume under pressure so that operation of the valve releases the liquid. Such a container can be inexpensively Vmade and may therefore be sold directly to the consumer as a dispensable item. ln addition, the containers may be made leakproof and quite compact Vso as to be readily portable in a handbag or the like.

To make the use of such container more attractive the present invention provides a permanent casing adapted to operate the container enclosed therein. The casing comprises an open-ended receptacle member for the container and a removable cap member telescopically mated with the receptacle member and variablein position along the telescopic axis. Further, the telescoping members are adapted so that they arrange the container therein with the operating axis of its valve Iin operative alignment with the telescopic axis. in this way relative telescopic movement of Vthe receptacle and cap members may be employed to operate the valve. The liquid thus released from the container may be conducted out of the casing through an opening in the cap member. Advantageously the liquid is conducted through a sharp angular bend so as to break up the uid into a nely distributed mist prior to its release from the cap member. A yplastic conduit -nited States Patent() rice insert .attached to the capmember in alignment with the hole therein and arranged so as to tit overthe `container' valve may be .employed for this purpose.

l(')ne of the primary advantages of the casing of the invention is the simplicity and speed with which it permits perfume'application. The valve in the pressure-tightcontainer will, of course, always besubjectto a reverse pressure tending to maintain it in a l.closed position. The valve maytherefore-be openedsimply -bytelescoping the casing by hand to apply pressure on the valve opposite to that Vnormally in operation. Ordinarily the casing -is of such a size that it maybe conveniently operated with the ythumb while .holding it in the palm of the hand. In this context the 'cap member provides fa large surface area for .the thumb operation. Ftnthermore, the normal reverse pressure on the valve may -be employed -to freturn the casing members to their original positions after lthe temporary operating pressure has been removed.

To prevent slippage of one casing -member Within the other While retaining the removability ofthe cap member, the invention prescribes that there be frictional `engagement between the telescoping members. Unfortunately, the operability of the casing would normally be impeded thereby. This is particularly true for the return operation which is dependent solely upon the normal reverse pressure of the valve. in solving this dilemma the invention provides :a projection extending laterally from the telescoping surface of one of the fcasing members. Further, .the `invention provides a'recess in the telescoping surface of the vother :member which is adapted to mate with this projection. -ln this way telescopic-,movement of the casing members is relatively frictionless whenthe projection is within the limits denedfby'the 'recess By properly proportioning the 4relative axial Ydimensions of the recess and projection this relatively yfrictionless telescoping range may be made vto substantially ycoincide with the range `of axial movement required for the 'operation of the valve. Only outside the limits '.of this recess does the projection 4extending from the one member abut against the -telmcoping surface of the othermember. Thus the frictional engagement required to prevent slippage is provided without imPeding'the operative telescopic movement :of the casing members.

AAdvantageously the faxial flimits o'f the recess are arranged so that ythe projection prevents 'the cap member bot-h `.from slipping out of or into the receptacle member by contact with the upper 1limit or lower limi-t, respectively. A recess without -a lower limit so arranged may also be employed, however, 'due to the support'prom'ded the cap member by the enclosed container.

In addition to the ease of operation 'and compactness as above described, many oher advantages adhere to the casing which forms the present invention. The perfume containing pressureftight container may be conveniently bought as an inexpensive, dispensable, `and leakproof unit. Replacement within the casing is then very simply and quickly effected by removing the cap Vmember from the receptacle member thus avoiding messiness and spillage. Furthermore, the casing can be `Very attractively and inexpensively made of a polished `lustrous metal.

The invention can best be understood lby referring to the lfollowing drawings in which:

Fig. l is a partially cut-away view of an embodiment of a spray dispenser in accordance with the invention;

tFig. 2 is a section of Fig. '1 taken along line Z-2;

Pig. 3 is a sectional view yof the dispenser of Fig. 1 illustrating itsoperation; I

Fig. 4 is a vsection of the casing Vof Fig. 2 'taken along line 4 4;

Fig. 5 is a partially cnt-away view of an alternate dispenser embodiment .in accordance with the invention;

YingY means; and' Fig. y8V is a partialsectionalview'of a dispenser in ac- Lcordance with theginvention showing further alternative Ytelescoping means.`

The invention willtbeY first described in connection with vthe dispenser embodiment illustrated in Figs. 1, 2, 3, and 4; y The casing comprises threebasic units, the receptacle member-,1,Y the cap member 2,Y and the cover member El;V The cover member 3 is Yemployed solely .for protectlitiga-thea cap member `and for presenting an outwardly attractive unit, Aand is removed-during theoperation .of the dispenser as illustrated in Fig. 3. The cap member is telescopically mated within the lreceptacle member and variable along thetelescopic axis which, in this case, coincides vwith thetlinetZYf-Z of Pig. 1.

, The liquid preparation to be sprayed is contained within a dispensable container 4. This container is. inserted within the casingtsimply byV removing the cap member 2, placing the container within the receptacle member, .and replacingtthe cap member. The container is made' pressure-tight. and the-.liquid therein is maintained at a pressure. substantially higher than that of the atmosphere, as,

forexample, is the'liquid within an aerosol container. Release offthe liquid .preparation from the vcontainer is an. opening through which'the pressurized liquid may Y escape. g Y

Inthe invention the operation of valve 5 is Veffected by relative telescopic movement of thecasing members 1 .then effectedrby means of -a plunger valve S. This valveY in its normal position seals thecontainer 4, retaining-the attractive unit. When the container 4 is emptied of liquid, replacement is simply a matter of throwing awaythe dispensable container-and substituting a new container unit within the casing. Y

The invention prescribes that there be frictional engagement between the cap member 2 and the receptacle member 1. Such engagement prevents the onev member from slipping out of the other member, while at the same time permitting removal of the cap member. Unfortunately, however, frictional engagement prevents the smoothV operation of the dispenser unit; particularly that operation which is dependent upon the valve 5 to return the cap member to its normal position, since'the return pressure on the valve may not be suicient toovercomethe frictional restraint. To solve this dilemma the cap member 2 is provided with a projection in the form of a lance 12 extending laterally outward from the cap member. vThis projection is dimensioned to normally abut against the inside surface of the receptacle member, as is best illustrated in Fig. 4, in order toprovide the desired frictionalV engagement. Further, the invention provides an annular depression 13. in the receptacle memberwhich is positioned so as to mate with the projection 12. Thus .when the projection is within-the 'limits defined bythe vdepression 13, the frictional engagement caused by the `projection will ble-removed and the telescopic movement of the casing members will be relatively frictionless. By properly proportioningfthe relative axial dimensions'of the depression .13., and the V'projection' 12 thisV relatively frictionless Vtelescoping range mayY bev made to coincide with the'range of 'axial movement lrequired for the operation of the valve 5. VVInvthis way the dilemma is solved;

since within the Avalve operating range defined by the depression relatively frictionless VtelescopicV movement is provided, ywhile outside the valve'operating, range the projection isV positioned withoutthe `recess thereby providing the frictional engagementrequiredto prevent slippage.

and '2., -Accordingly, the' casing members are adapted to i' arrange the'container 4 with'the operating axis of the valve 5 in operative alignment with their telescopic axis as illustrated Yin Fig. 2. Further, the cap member is provided with a plastic insert 6 havingY aconduit 7 therein designed to lead the liquid out of the cap member, and to direct itpto its desired point of application.. To this end, the insert 6 is positioned with one end ofthe conduit 7 mating with the valve S, while theother end of the. conduit mates witha nozzle 8 forming a liquid-tight external seal withrthe cap member.

that it leads to a smaller opening in the nozzle which thus forms a shoulder across mostof the conduit diameter. These features are `designed therein to convert the It Vwill be noted that i Y the conduit incorporates a'sharp right-angular bendand 0 pressurized liquid escaping from/the containerY 4 into a finely divided mist as illustrated in Pig. 3.

...In its operation the dispenser is held in the hand while pressure is downwardly applied mth the thumb to the top of the cap member to telescope the cap `member within Vthe, ,receptacle Amember. as Villustrated in Fig. 3. .'lhe top of the ,cap member 9 is therefore advantageously shaped to tit the thumb. .The Vcoincidence of the operating axisk of the valveS with the telescoping axis of the casing members depresses the valve within the container 4to release the liquid through thetconduit 7 and'fout of the nozzle 8. as agiinely divided mist.Y Advantageously the base of the container 4 isseparated from the bottom of the .receptacle member by meansv of Va kcushion 10 to facilitatetbe .described operation..y Y f Y The simplicitygand-ease oftoperatlon apparent. The

dispensing of-thcliquid is effected by-providing'operating Vpressure with the Vthumb to telescope the Vcasing as illustrated in'FigfSt. VUpon removalof'the thumb the return pressure continuously acting upon the valve 5 operates to return the cap member to its normal position as illustrated in Fig. 2. -Thecover memberv 3 may .then be replaced asin Fig. 1 to' complete the portable, compact, leakproof,

The depressionY 13 .serves a double purpose inthat Yit provides an annular projection-14ron the outside surface of the receptacle member 1.- This annular Aprojection is advantageously employed as a shoulder against which the covermember 3 may abut when in position. Iuthis context a lance projection 11 is providedon the outside surface of the receptacle member to frictionally'engage the cover 3 thus retaining it ini-position.

Anlembodiment alternative to that described is illustrated in Figs. 5 and 6. This embodiment again encloses a pressurized container 4 -Within a receptacle member 20 and a cap member 21. Again, the valve of the container 4 is matedwithin 'an insert leading to a nozzle 8 while the base of the containeris separated from the bottom of the'receptacle member 20 by a cushion 10. Further, the operation of the container is again effected by relative telescopic movement of the cap member 21-and the receptacle member 20. t v

Y The major diterence inthe instant embodiment lies in the means providing frictional engagement between the two casingmembers while permitting relatively frictionless operative movement. The projection is again in the v wherein the means .forpermitting' relatively frictionless operative movement vcliier in one major respectfrorn those described hereinbefore. y AIn the Y.embodiments Yof Figs. l melige @the ,messes are .axallydimensionsd what their, upper and lower limits prevent the cap member from either slipping into or out of the receptacle member. However, as best seen in Fig. 3 there is very little danger that the cap member 2 will slip into the receptacle member 1 due to the support provided by the enclosed pressuretight container 4. Further, with the container 4 removed, the nozzle 8 may be dimensioned to project beyond the lip of the receptacle member to prevent the cap member from slipping therewithin.

For these reasons annular depressions of the type shown in Figs. 7 and 8, wherein means for preventing slippage of the cap member into the receptacle member are not provided, may also -be employed in the dispenser unit of the invention where preferred. The depression of Fig. 7 is formed by press fitting an annular insert 25 Within a receptacle 24 with the lower edge of the insert arranged to form the upper limit of the depression. In this way, when within the volume defined by the insert member 2S, the projection 27 on cap member 26 will frictionally engage the insert to prevent outward slippage. However, when the projection is below the lower edge of the insert, within the annular depression, substantially non-frictionless telescoping movement is provided to permit the dispenser operation. Since means for preventing slippage of the cap member into the receptacle member is not required, the depression may extend down to the bottom of the receptacle member thereby actually forming a major portion thereof.

In the embodiment of Fig. 8 the necessity `for employing a separate insert is avoided by dimensioning the receptacle member 28 so that the diameter of its upper portion 30 is made smaller than the remainder to form a shoulder 29. The position of this shoulder is arranged to provide the upper limit of the annular depression thus formed. Frictional engagement preventing outward slippage of the cap member 31 is then provided by the receptacle upper portion 3l) and a projection 32, While the depression formed in the remainder of the receptacle member provides the required substantially non-frictionless operative movement.

One of the advantages provided by the embodiment of Fig. 8 is derived hom its use in conjunction with a cover member like that denoted by the numeral 3 in Fig. 1. T'ne annular depression of Fig. 8 forms an annular projection wherein shoulder 29 provides an abutment for seating such a cover member as does the upper limit of the annular projection 14 of Fig. 1. However, the cover member so seated in Fig. 8 produces a dispenser having a smooth cylindrical outside surface unbroken by the inward bend resulting from the `arrangement of the lower limit of the depression of Fig. 1. It will also be noted that such smooth efect may be produced in the embodiment of Fig. 7 by raising the upper edge of insert 25 above that of the receptacle member to form a seat for a cover member therefor.

Wherever the term recess has been used heretofore and is used in the appended claims, it is intended to be generic in nature so as to include within its meaning the depression 13 of Fig. 2, the opening 23 of Fig. 6, and the depressions of Figs. 7 and 8.

Preferred embodiments of the invention have been described. Various changes and modifications may be made in the scope of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.

We claim:

1. For use in combination with a disposable valve-operated, pressurized container of the type having an axially depressible tube at one end forming a combined valve and outlet and normally urged axially outward to a closed position, a permanent casing comprising an open-ended receptacle member for said container, a removable cap member telescopically mated with said receptacle member and variable in position along the telescopic axis, said cap and receptacle members being adapted to support said container with the operating `axis of its valve tube in operative alignment with said telescopic axis, insert means in said cap member engaging the valve tube and forming a passage leading to the exterior of said cap member for the discharge of contents of the container, said insert means having a tube-engaging shoulder for operating said valve upon relative telescopic movement of said cap and receptacle members, one of said members having a recess in the telescoping surface thereof, and a projection extending laterally from the telescoping surface of the other of said members to fit Within the said recess when said cap member is telescopically fitted with said receptacle member, the axial dimensions of said projection and said recs being proportioned to permit relatively irictionless telescopic movement of said cap member relative to said receptacle member substantially throughout the axial operating range of said valve.

2. The combination of claim l, in which the said projection is in ythe `form of a lance.

3. A permanent casing in accordance with claim 1, in which the said recess is in the form of an opening.

4. A permanent casing in accordance with claim 3, in which the said opening is arranged within the said cap member, and the said projection is arranged on the said receptacle member.

5. A permanent casing in accordance with claim 1, in which the said recess is in the form of an annular depression providing a shoulder.

6. A permanent casing in accordance with claim l, in which the recess is formed by an annular insert xed to one of the telescoping members and providing a shoulder for engaging said projection.

7. For use in combination with a disposable, valveoperated, pressurized container of the type having an axially depressible tube at one end forming a combined valve and outlet and normally urged axially outward to a closed position, 'a permanent casing comprising an openended receptacle member for said container, a removable cap member telescopically mated within said receptacle member and variable in position along the telescopic axis, said cap and receptacle members being adapted to support said container with the operating axis of its valve tube in operative alignment with said telescopic axis, insert means in said cap member engaging the valve tube and forming a passage leading to the exterior of said cap member for the discharge of contents of the container, said insert means having a tube-engaging shoulder for operating said valve upon relative telescopic movement of said cap and receptacle mem-bers, an annular depression in the telescoping inner surface of said receptacle member forming an annular projection on the outer surface thereof, a projec tion extending laterally outward from the telescoping outer surface of said cap member adapted to lit within the said depression when the said cap member is telescopically fitted in said receptacle member, the -axial dimensions of said projection and said depression being proportioned to permit relatively irictionless telescopic movement of said cap member relative to said receptacle member substantially throughout the axial operating range of said valve, and a cover member for said cap member adapted to iit over said receptacle member 'in abutting relationship with said annular projection.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,116,752 Stolk Nov. 10, 1914 1,827,396 Luckett Oct. 13, 1931 2,514,516 Root July 11, 1950 2,685,387 Gandy Aug. 3, 1954 2,763,395 Meek Sept. 18, 1956

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1116752 *Oct 31, 1913Nov 10, 1914John M G StolkBox.
US1827396 *Apr 22, 1929Oct 13, 1931American Tobacco CoTelescopically collapsible box
US2514516 *Mar 26, 1946Jul 11, 1950Root Ralph RDuster
US2685387 *Apr 4, 1950Aug 3, 1954Rene GanayCosmetic dispenser
US2763395 *Jun 6, 1952Sep 18, 1956Airkem IncDiffuser devices
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3107826 *Dec 23, 1960Oct 22, 1963Metal Fabrications IncSpray devices
US3128916 *Jul 3, 1961Apr 14, 1964Dior Christian ParfumsSpray with refill aerosols
US3139223 *Dec 22, 1960Jun 30, 1964Metal Fabrications IncSpray dispensing devices
US3157317 *Aug 28, 1961Nov 17, 1964Landers Frary & ClarkHolder for bottles and the like
US3176391 *Dec 28, 1962Apr 6, 1965Hyman ResnickReservoir safety razor
US3189232 *Oct 22, 1962Jun 15, 1965Park Plastics Co IncDispenser for an aerosol container
US3191867 *Oct 23, 1963Jun 29, 1965RevlonAtomizer
US3198399 *Oct 5, 1961Aug 3, 1965Valve Corp Of AmericaHand-held aerosol device
US3216625 *May 25, 1964Nov 9, 1965Calmar IncProtective overcap and stop means for a dispenser
US3236458 *Feb 14, 1963Feb 22, 1966Ramis JeanAerosol apparatus
US3344959 *Jul 29, 1965Oct 3, 1967Faso William JDoor mounted spraying devices
US3429310 *May 5, 1966Feb 25, 1969Sterling Drug IncAerosol inhalating device
US3756467 *Dec 13, 1971Sep 4, 1973Anketell JNight stick
US3964647 *Mar 11, 1975Jun 22, 1976Dearling Harry SSpray dispensing device
US4077119 *Feb 16, 1977Mar 7, 1978Jose Manuel SelleraShaving device
US4220263 *Oct 11, 1977Sep 2, 1980Caruso Albert PCombined holder for keys and protective spray
US4449474 *Aug 13, 1982May 22, 1984Suzi Stone Enterprises, Inc.Personal security device
US4791723 *Mar 6, 1987Dec 20, 1988Jacobson Jeff ADisposable combination razor and shaving cream dispenser with movable cap
US5133130 *Dec 17, 1990Jul 28, 1992Gregory PodolskyShaving device
US5287995 *Apr 9, 1992Feb 22, 1994Redman Kenneth RTear gas defense system
US5305874 *Apr 7, 1993Apr 26, 1994Mclaughlin John HSelf-protection chemical dispenser holder
US5443192 *May 10, 1994Aug 22, 1995Mclaughlin International, Inc.Belt-mounted detachable holster for holding a chemical deterrent canister
US5862960 *Feb 28, 1997Jan 26, 1999S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Aerosol dispenser
US5875934 *Aug 19, 1998Mar 2, 1999S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Replacement cartridge for an aerosol dispenser
US6337052 *Nov 15, 1999Jan 8, 2002The Penn State Research FoundationInsulated specimen container
US8894044 *Aug 17, 2012Nov 25, 2014S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Dispenser
US20030141330 *Jan 25, 2002Jul 31, 2003Mcdonald Kenneth J.Defensive spray container holster
US20140047983 *Aug 17, 2012Feb 20, 2014Paul E. FurnerDispenser
USRE29639 *Jul 6, 1977May 23, 1978Tobe DearlingSpray dispensing device
WO1988006511A1 *Mar 4, 1988Sep 7, 1988Jacobson Jeffrey ADisposable combination razor and shaving cream dispenser with movable cap
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/183, 30/41, 239/573, 220/8, 239/337
International ClassificationA61M11/08, A61M11/06, B65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/384
European ClassificationB65D83/38E