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Publication numberUS2941696 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 21, 1960
Filing dateAug 19, 1957
Priority dateAug 19, 1957
Publication numberUS 2941696 A, US 2941696A, US-A-2941696, US2941696 A, US2941696A
InventorsHomm Roger Edwin
Original AssigneeOrtho Pharma Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dispensing container
US 2941696 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 2l, 1960 R. E. HOMM DISPENSING CONTAINER Filed Aug. 19, 1957 INVENTOR P0454 27 wwf/0MM BMWA W ATTORNEY United States 'PatentA DISPENSING CONTAINER Roger Edwin Homin, Neshanic, NJ.,-assignor to Ortho .lharmaceutical Corporation, a corporation of New ersey e Filed Aug. 19, 1957, Ser. No. 678,930

1 Claim. (Cl. 222-136) The present invention relates to a dispensing container of the aerosol type. More specifically, thepresent invention relates to an aerosol container that is divided-into compartments, each compartment containing a special type of solution andan aerosol propellant. A valve communicates with eachV compartment within the container permitting the operator to dispense solutions from each compartment simultaneously.

The general objectV of the present invention is to provide a container-from which a plurality of reacting liquids canA be simultaneously dispensed. One of the'speciic objects of the invention is to provide an improved d-ispenser for reagents that would react and precipitate if present in a single mixture. A container of the type to be described provides a method of applying spray-on bandages and therapeutic agents using as a carrier aerosol sprays.

There has long been a need for dressings that might be easily applied to wound surfaces. Many chemicals are known which will react to form precipitates or release gases and form spongy masses that would be useful in covering a wound. The aerosol container described herein provides a practical and convenient method of simultaneously precipitating and applying the wound dressing.

I am aware that there have been a number of prior proposals for a multiple compartment container adapted to dispense incompatable liquids. However, the present invention is structurally different trom containers described in the prior art and enables one to dispense two or more reactants in aerosol form, the reaction occurning outside of the container as the reagents are propelled toward the target and being completed as the reagents are mixed and combined at the surface of the target.

Another characteristic of the invention is the provision of a valve arrangement that permits the reacting solutions to mix in a manner such that there is no obstruction or clogging of the exit orifice upon repeated spraying.

Other advantages of my invention will become apparent in the ensuing specification and appended drawings in which:

Figure 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of a container embodying my invention.

Figure 2 is an enlarged sectional view of a valve that will simultaneously dispense two aerosol sprays without clogging.

Figure 3 is a longitudinal sectional view of a modilied form of the valve illustrated in Figure 2.

Figure 4 is a longitudinal sectional view of another modification of a dual dispensing valve.

Reacting materials such as a 'solution of pectin and a solution of a calcium salt will form a iibrous precipitate when mixed together and are most useful when applied immediately after mixing. In the dispensing container o my invention such reactants are stored in separate compartments as illustrated in Figure l. Such a container may be constructed -to include a bottom 13, an outer cylinder wall 14, a shoulder or top conical wall memice ber 15 suitably secured to the cylindrical shell 14 or formed integral therewith and an exit valve having a. base 17 and a head section 21. A common wall 20 divides the cylinder 14 into two separate compartments 11 and 12. The base of the exit valve carries two sep# `arate conduits 18 and 19 which communicate with the individual compartments x11 and 12. The conduits 18` and 19 extend to a point adjacent to the bo-ttom wall 13 to' facilitate dispensing the entire contents when the con, tainer is held in a vertical position.

Referring now to Figure 2, the valve comprises twosections, a base 17 and a head section 21. Both sections.

- which force the stops 31 and 32 to seat against the rubber Vwashers 27 and 28. The solid projections 33 and 34 function` as al spring and valveguide. The stops 3,1w

and 432 alsofunction in this manner as they slidingly litv againstthe cylindrical walls 3S and 36 in the valve base 17. When the valve head 21 -is depressed by manual pressure against the tension of springs 35 and 36 the ports 25 and 26 are opened to the conduits 18 and 19 and the contents of compartments "11 and 12 are simultaneously forced by the pressure within these compartments through the orifice 24 where mixing occurs. Some reaction mayvoccur within the orifice 24 but movement through the oriiice is so rapid that the major reaction is effected outside of this oriiice and no clogging occurs.

The modilication of my valve as illustrated in Figure 3 differs trom the design illustrated in Figure 2 in that mixing occurs not in the exit orifice 24 but immediately prior to the point that both liquids enter the exit orifice. Figure 4 is yet another modiiication of my valve in which all mixing of the reactants occurs after the atomized liq uids have left the valve. In this modification the valve head 21 is provided with two onices 37 and 38. 'I'hese oriiices converge to assist mixing.

The use of the container of my invention to apply a fibrous dressing directly to a wound surface is illustrated in the following example.

Example I A two-compartment pressure container is constructed as described above, the volume of each compartment being approximately 300 cc. One compartment was charged with a 2% aqueous solution of alginic acid and the other compartment was charged with a 30% aqueous solution of aluminum chlorohydrol. The container was cooled to about 30 C. and approximately vll0 cc. of an aerosol propellant was added to each compartment. The propellant may be Freon 11, a fluorinated hydrocarbon having the formula CC13F and boiling at 23.7 C., mixed in. equal quantities with Freon 12, a fluorinated hydrocarbonv having the formula CCl2F2 and boiling at 29.8 C. Ten cubic centimeters of this Freon mixture will provide a pressure within each compartment of about 40 pounds per square inch at normal room temperatures.

After each compartment of the container is charged with reactants and the propellant, the valve is aixed and the container is permitted to warm up to room temperature. When the valve is depressed, the solutions of alginic Y acid and aluminum chlorohydrol are expelled as a ne mist which reacts and forms a brous precipitate at the target area.

It will be recognized that the container of the present Y For example, film-formingsolutions such as aqueous solutions of carboxymethylcellulose or methylcellulose" may: be appliedvv simultaneously with solutions of an antif biotic. plasminogen and streptokinase maybe applied in: this manner and will react to form the proteolytic enzyme plasmn, useful in the debnidementy of,A wounds; TheV container may also-be quite useful in applying simultaneously to4 a surface a resin monomer coatingr and a polymerization catalyst, converting thel resin in place to form; a protective coatingat thesurface. Epoxy-resins, for example, as descnibed in Ci'reenleelPatentl No; 2,5851,- 115, form extremely resistantA and impermeable coatings when polymerization of'the-epoxide groupsv is electedf by an active hydrogen compound: such asa polyamine. Mix-f tures of the polyepoxide resinand` polyamine convert rapidily upon mixing and application of such oompositions 'has long been a problem. The container of' my invention provides a practical methody of applyingV anepoxide resin andan amine to a surface simultaneously', conversion of the resin occurringon the surface at the time of application.

While the particular forms of the invention hereinV described are well adapted to carry out the objects of the invention, it is understood that various modications and1 changes may be made without departing from the` principles` of the. invention,y and the inventionincludes all such modifications and changes as come within the vscope of the appended claim. v

What is claimed is:

In a device for dispensing a liquid under pressure, in combination; a cylindrical container divided into two separate compartments by a common wall extending the length of the container; a conduit positioned within each separate compartment; a dual valve operating member having a common exit` erice separately communicating with, two hollow valve members having annular projections slidably positioned within each conduit; valve.` seats at the end of each conduit which contact the annular projections,wheruheV valve members are ina closed position; a horizontal' pont in each valve member disposed References Cited in the tile of this patent-v UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,094,761 Thousand a, Apr. 2 8, 19114` 1,981,446 Apfelbaum Nov. 20,l 1934 2,532,187 Paasche Nov. 2,8, 1950iv

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3022199 *Nov 12, 1959Feb 20, 1962Dow Chemical CoTreatment of felts
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US3269389 *Mar 11, 1963Aug 30, 1966Fisher William LCompartmental dispensing container for nose and throat preparations
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US3289887 *Sep 17, 1965Dec 6, 1966Colgate Palmolive CoDispensing of reactive cleansing materials
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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/136, 424/47, 222/402.24, 222/145.1, D09/448, 239/573, 128/200.19, 239/306
International ClassificationB65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/68
European ClassificationB65D83/68