Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2941729 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 21, 1960
Filing dateApr 26, 1955
Priority dateApr 26, 1955
Publication numberUS 2941729 A, US 2941729A, US-A-2941729, US2941729 A, US2941729A
InventorsGoodrie Joseph J
Original AssigneeWrightway Engineering Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hose nozzle with aerator
US 2941729 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 21, 1960 Filed April 26, 1955 J. J- GOODRIE HOSE NOZZLE WITH AERATOR 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 PRIOR ART E PRI'oR ART INVENTOR.

5e )zJ 65062 716,

June 21, 1960 J. J. GQODRIE HOSE NOZZLE WITH AERATOR 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 26, 1955 INVENTOR. JGoodn re States Patent Ofice 2,941,729 Patented June 21, 1960 HOSE NOZZLE WITH AERATOR Joseph J. Goodrie, Lansing, 111., assignor to Wrightway Engineering (30., Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Filed Apr. 26, 1955, Ser. No. 503,898

Claims. (Cl. 239-430) This invention relates to improvements in nozzles for' hoses or the like.

The usual garden hose for ordinary household use is customarily equipped with an adjustable nozzle by means of which the user can regulate both the water output from the hose and also, to a limited extent, the character of the water stream. For example, one common type of hose nozzle utilizes an adjustable needle type valve which when fully open produces a coherent stream of water and when partially closed produces a diverging spray of water. However, with this type of hose nozzle inorder to obtain a fine gentle water spray, as is frequently desirable, the valve means must approach an almost entirely closed position thereby severely restricting the flow rate or volume output from the hose. In other words, it has been impossible to regulate the nozzle to obtain both a fine water spray and a high volume flow rate of water. with the usual hose nozzle heretofore known, the spray which is obtained when the valve means is substantially closed is in the form of a wide angle diverging coneshaped stream which is essentially empty in its center portion so that in effect the spray is merely an annular curtain of water. t a

A primary object of the present invention is to-provide an improved nozzle for hoses or the like which overcomes the aforementioned limitations and disadvantages of the nozzles heretofore in common use.

Another object of the invention is to provide anovel hose nozzle for usewhere a gentle spray or mist is desired.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel hose nozzle which is capable of producing a fine gentle spray while at the same time providing a desired high flow rate from the nozzle.

- A further object of the invention is to provide a novel hose nozzle adapted to produce a fine gentle spray having a full water pattern and without wide angle divergence.

An additional object of the invention is to provide in a hose nozzle novel adjustable means for producing a regulated fine spray of water which is aerated and substantially non-splashing.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a novel combination of an adjustable hose nozzle and an aerating means.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become evident from the subsequent detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein:

Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of a hose nozzle comprising one specific embodiment of the invention and showing in diagrammatic fashion the spray pattern from the nozzle;

Fig. 2 is a' cross-sectional view through the spray taken along the line 2-2 of Fig. 1; t

Fig. 3 is a side elevational view of a conventional hose Moreover, it is common knowledge that nozzle and illustrating in diagrammatic fashion the spray pattern; 1

Fig. 4 is a cross sectional view through the spray as taken along the line 4-4 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a longitudinal sectional view on an enlarged scale of the nozzle structure seen in Fig. 1, the device being shown in closed position;

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view similar-to Fig. 5 but showing the mechanism in open position;

Fig. 7 is a transverse sectional view taken along the line 7--7 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is a side elevational view of a hose nozzle comprising a different embodiment of the invention;

Fig. 9 is a longitudinal sectional view on an enlarged scale of the device shown in Fig. 8, the valve mechanism thereof'heing shown in open position;

Fig. 10 is a view similar to Fig. 9 but showing the valve means in closed position;

Fig. '11 is an end elevational view as seen along the line 11--11 of Fig. 9;

Fig. 12 is a transverse sectional view taken along the line 1212 of Fig. 9; and

Fig. 13 is a fragmentary transverse sectional view as taken along the line 13-13 of Fig. 9.

Referring first to Figs. 1-2 and 5-7, the first embodiment of the invention comprises a pair of elongated inner and outer coaxial tubular members 16 and 17 having coacting threaded portions 18 and 19, respectively, for permitting relative axial adjustment between the two members in response to rotation of one member with respect to the other. The inner tubular member 16 is rigidly secured to an internally threaded cup-shaped connector 21 for detachably securing the nozzle on the usual complementary threaded fitting 22 (Fig. 1) provided on a hose 23. The opposite end of the elongated inner tubular member 16 is closed axially and is formed with an integral breakup plug or element 214 for the purpose hereinafter described. Adjacentthe closed end of the tubular member 16, the wall of the tube is provided with a plurality of enlarged apertures or openings 26 for discharge of fluid therefrom.

The outer tubular element or sleeve 17 normally comprises the adjustable member of the nozzle inasmuch as the inner tubular element 16 is rigidly secured to the hose 23 when the connection 21-22 is tightened. The lower end of the sleeve 17 is flared outwardly or enlarged, as at 27, and has threadedly secured thereon a cup-shaped packing gland or follower 28 having a central aperture 29 through which the inner tubular element 16 extends in axially slidable relation. A mass of valve packing or sealing material 30 of any suitable charac-- ter is disposed within the packing gland 28 in sealing relation around the tubular element 16, and an annular retainer ring 31 is also fitted in the packing gland 28 for holding the packing 30 in place. Obviously, as the outer sleeve 17 is rotated relative to the inner tubular element 16 at the threaded connection 1819 therebetween, the sleeve 17 will move axially relative to the element 16 and during such movement loss of fluid from the inner end of the nozzle is prevented by the packing 30.

At the upper end of the sleeve 17 an inwardly extending flange portion or restriction 32 is provided having a central aperture 33 which functions as a valve seat. A tapered portion 34 is formed on the closed upper end of the tubular element 16 for coaction with the edge of the opening 33, the taper 34 thereby functioning as an adjustable valve member and coacting with the aperture 33 to provide variable orifice means. In Fig. 5," the outer sleeve 17 hasbeen screwed downwardly so that the edge of the aperture 33 seats against the taper 34 thereby fully closing the fluid outlet or orifice means. In Fig. 6, the outer sleeve 17 has been screwed outwardly relative to the tubular element 16 so as to provide maximum annular clearance between the periphery of the aperture 33 and a reduced diameter spool portion 36 on the valve member which is located intermediate the taper 34 and the enlarged break-up plug 24.

For coaction with the break-up plug 24, the outer end of the sleeve 17 has an outwardly flared threaded lip portion 37 to which is detachably secured a short tubular casing 38 surrounding the stem or spool 36 and the plug 24 in annularly spaced relation. The lip 3-7 of the sleeve 17 is also formed'with a plurality of circumferentially spaced openings or ports 39 which serve as air inlets for admitting air to an air and water mixing chamber, designated at 41, within the interior of the casing 38. In the present instance four such ports 39 (Fig. 7) are provided but it will be understood that any desired number of ports may be used. Adjacent the outer end of the casing 38, a circumferential rib 42 having a curved shoulder portion 43 extends around the interior of the casing.

In the operation of the device, water under pressure passes from the hose 23 through the tubular member 16 and the outlet apertures 26 and thence in a generally an nular stream through the open valve means 33-34. As the annular stream of water enters the mixing and breakup chamber 41, outside air is drawn into the chamber 41 through the ports 39 and the water jet with the entrained air then impinges with considerable force against the enlarged break-up plug 24. This violent impingement causes considerable splashing and diversion of the Water stream outwardly against the casing 38 resulting in a very effective break-up and mixing action so that the water is thoroughly aerated and dispersed. The open or unobstructed space at the outlet end of the casing 38 and also the annular space between the casing 38 and the stem 36 with its break-up plug 24 is substantially greater than the area of the annular valve opening when the valve is in its wide open-position as shown in Fig. 6. As a result ofthis relationship, there is no tendency for incoming water to fill the mixing chamber 41 defined between the casing 38 and the stem-plug structure 36-24. Consequently, the stream or jet of water issuing from the open valve means is always surrounded by air and proper impingement and break-up of the water stream with eifective entrainment of air are realized because of the absence of any substantial restrictions to fluid flow downstream from the valve means. As the mixture of commingled air and Water passes beyond the break-up plug 24, part of the mixture impinges upon the curved shoulder portion 43 thereby resulting in further break-up and splashing of the air-water mixture. As the mixture emerges from the open end of the casing 38, it is in the form of a relatively narrow axially directed spray 44 (Figs. 1 and 2 having a very gentle or soft non-splashing action as a result of the high degree of aeration and mixing of the water and air.

As seen particularly in Fig. 2, the water pattern of the spray is substantially uniform and full so that eifective spray action is obtained throughout the cross sectional area of the spray." This is in sharp contrast to the conventional hose nozzle as heretofore described where, as seen in Figs. 3 and 4, the adjustment of the nozzle to provide a fine spray results in a relatively wide angle diverging or conicfl spray which provides merely an annular sheet or curtain 45 of water with the center portion of the spray being substantially empty and ineifective. Obviously, with a spray pattern of this type, it is extremely difficult to obtain effective utilization of the spray such as in the watering of flowers or shrubs or in various washing or rinsing operations.

One very important improvement advantage of the present invention is the fact that an effective gentles'pray isob'tained from the nozzle even through the valve means is open to a very wide extent so as to have a high volume flow rate of the water from the nozzle. 1n the conventional hose nozzle, a fine spray is obtained only when the valve means is closed sufiiciently to provide only a very small opening so that the volume output from the nozzle is seriously reduced. In this connection, it is to be noted that the break-up means, comprising in this instance the enlarged plug 24, is located downstream from the valve means 3334 which controls the flow from the nozzle thereby insuring impingement of the eflluent water from the valve against the break-up means. Furthermore, the break-up means is carried in unitary fashion at the outer end of the valve member so that the position of the break-up plug 24 is changed in unison with a change in position of the valve member relative to the outer sleeve and easing structure 17-38.

In the particular embodiment of the invention illustrated in Figs. 5 to 7, the distance between the breakup plug 24 and the valve outlet 33- varies inversely with the extent to which the valve means is opened. In other words, when the valve means 33-34, is open to only a very slight extent, the break-up plug 24 is positioned at its maximum axial distance from the valve outlet 33. On the other hand, when the valve means 33-34 is wide open as seen in Fig. 6, the break-up plug 24 is 7 located much closer to the valve opening 33. This coordination of the relative position of the break-up plug with the extent of opening of the valve means is important to insure the production of an eifective well aerated gentle spray in all of the adjusted positions of the nozzle. As the valve opening increases, the volume flow rate from the valve means also increases but the fluid velocity decreases. Consequently, the axial retraction of the break-up plug 24 relative to the sleeve 17 and the casing 38 results in more eifective impact or impinge ment of the eflluent Water jet against the enlarged breakup plug 24 at the reduced fluid velocity and also increases the degree of outward deflection or angular divergence of the water against the interior of the casing 38. This will be apparent from the fact that the outwardly tapered enlargement, as indicated at 46, on the break-up plug 24 is located closely adjacent the valve opening 33 in the Fig. 6 position of the nozzle so that the stream of water issuing from the valve opening 33 at the maximum flow rate is immediately and forcibly diverted against the casing 38. Furthermore, the relative retraction of the breakup plug 24 when the valve means is wide open results in an increase in the free or open space at the outlet end of the casing 38 thereby diminishing any flow restriction effects in the casing 38 as the volume rate of flow from the nozzle is increased.

Referring now to Figs. 8 to 13, a somewhat diiferent' structural embodiment of the invention will be described which utilizes the same broad structural principles heretofore described. The nozzle adjustment mechanism involving the concentric tubular inner member and outer sleeve construction is the same as in the first described embodiment and need not be repeated here. The same reference numerals are used to illustrate the parts of the construction which are not changed. The principal difference in the device resides in the valve means for regulating the flow of water from the nozzle and in the means for obtaining break-up and aeration of the water stream. Y

The outwardly flared lip 37 at the outer end of the sleeve 17 does not have the air inlet ports shown at 39 in the previous embodiment of the invention. In addition, thecentral aperture 33 in the inwardly extending flange 32 of the sleeve 17 is formed with a plurality of edgewise recesses or notches 47 so that when the tapered portion 34 on the tubular member 16 is seated against the edge of the opening 33, the eflluent water stream may still pass freely through the unobstructed notches 47. Thus, the

engagement of the taper 34 with the edge of the aperture 33 serves merely as a stop to limit the relative movement of the sleeve 17 on the tubular member 16 and does not function to any substantial extent as a valve means for regulation of fluid flow.

In this instance, a tubular casing 48 is detachably connected to the threaded lip portion 37 of the outer sleeve 17 and is provided with a plurality of lateral slots 49, three being shown in this instance, which function as air inlet ports. A disk member 51 is disposed within the casing 48 upstream from the slots 49 and seats against the end of the lip portion 37 with a gasket 52 interposed therebetween. A slight shoulder 53 on the interior of the casing 48 holds the disk member 51 in assembled position. The disk member 51 has a plurality of apertures 54 and an upstanding integral skirt portion 56 which serves as a valve seat and also as a shield for the air inlet ports 49, as hereinafter described. The outer closed end of the tubular member 16 beyond the taper 34 has an integral stem 57 which extends through the disk 51 and has threadedly connected to its outer end a tapered plug or valve member 58 extending into and coacting with the outlet end of the skirt 56 as a valve means for regulation of fluid flow. The break-up means for the water stream in this form of the invention comprises a disk member 59 having a plurality of narrow radial slots 61, the disk 59 being rigidly attached to the outer end of the valve plug 58 by means of a screw 62 and a washer 63. r

In operation, when the valve means 56-58 is open as in Fig. 9, water flows from the discharge openings 26 in the tubular member 16 through the notched openings 47 and thence through the openings 54 in the disk 51 into the confined zone designated at 64 within the tubular skirt 56. Because of its restricted volume the zone 64 always runs full of water which then discharges through the annular valve opening between the open end of the skirt portion 56 and the tapered valve plug 58 into a mixing zone 66 within the interior of the casing 48. By reason of the outward tapering of the valve plug 58, the efiiuent stream of water from the supply zone 64 is in the form of a diverging annulus which in passing to the outlet end of the casing 48 entrains or draws in air which enters the mixing zone 66 through the lateral ports 49 in the casing 48. During this entrainment of air, the skirt 56 serves as a shield for the air inlet ports 49 and prevents clogging of the latter with water. As the annular stream of water with entrained air discharges from. the nozzle through the slots 61 in the break-up disk 59, the water stream is broken up and efiectively intermixed with the entrained air to provide a spray having the desired soft gentle and non-splashing characteristics. In addition, the spray has the same relatively narrow angle configuration shown in Fig. 1 and the same substantially uniform full water pattern in transverse cross-section as illustrated in Fig. 2.

As heretofore mentioned, the tapered portion 34 on the tubular member 16 coacts with the edge of the opening 33 for limiting the extent of opening movement of the valve means 56-58. This is important since it is necessary that the annular valve opening between the skirt 56 and the tapered valve plug 58 have an area which is always less than the discharge area of the spray through the slots 61 in the break-up disk. With this area relationship thus maintained there will be no tendency for the mixing chamber 66 to fill with water as a result of restrictions to fluid flow downstream from the valve. Thus, the proper air entraining efiect is realized at all times by passage of the annular water jet through the mixing zone 66 and thence through the break-up disk 59-61. The stop action as just described is also important to insure that the break-up disk 59-61 is never disposed beyond the outer end of the casing 48 so that at all times the stream of mixed air and water issuing from the control valve means must pass through the break-up disk regardless of the extent to which the valve is open. In addition, to the stop action by the parts 33-34, the valve position is further limited by abutment of the axial end of the pack-ing gland 28 against the opposed axial end of the cup-shaped connector 21, as illustrated in Fig. 9.

When the nozzle is closed, as shown in Fig. 10, the outer axial end of the skirt 56 makes circumferential contact with the tapered valve plug 58 thereby sealing the valve opening and closing the nozzle. At the same time, it will be noted that in this second embodiment of the invention the distance of the break-up member or slotted disk 59-61 from the valve opening varies directly with the extent to which the valve is open. In this respect the action is directly opposite to the Figs. 5 to 7 embodiment of the invention. Thus, when the valve is completely open as in Fig. 9, the break-up disk 59-61 is at its maximum distance from the outlet end of the skirt 56. On the other hand, when the valve is almost completely closed approaching the Fig. 10 position, the break-up disk 59-61 is closest to the end of the skirt 56. This relationship has been found to be desirable with the slotted disk form of break-up member in order to insure a properly aerated spray having the desired soft gentle nonsplashing characteristics in all positions of the valve means.

Although the invention has been described with particular reference to certain specific structural embodiments thereof, it will be understood that various modifications and equivalent structures may be resorted to without departing from the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a hose nozzle, an inner tubular member having one end adapted tobe connected to a hose outlet, a valve portion adjacent the opposite end of said tubular member,-

an outer concentric sleeve structure surrounding said tubular member and having a transversely extending apertured partition intermediate the ends thereof providing a valve seat portion, said tubular member extending axially through said apertured partition and said sleeve structure being axially adjustable relative to said tubular member for moving said valve seat portion into and out of engagement with said valve portion and thereby regulating the flow of fluid from the nozzle, said sleeve structure having a tubular casing portion at its outermost end defining an enlarged mixing zone downstream from said partition, a breakup element unitary with the outermost end of said tubular member downstream. from said valve portion, said breakup element being within the confines of said mixing zone and downstream from said partition in all axial positions of said sleeve structure, said sleeve structure being provided with air inlet ports in communication with said mixing zone, whereby the efiiuent fluid is mixed with air in said zone and impinges against said element prior to discharge from the nozzle.

2. The device of claim 1 further characterized in that said partition has a central aperture forming said valve seat portion, said valve portion comprises a tapered section on said inner tubular member in upstream relation to said partition, and said tubular member has a reduced diameter extension projecting downstream from said tapered section through said aperture and having a terminal enlargement unitary with its outermost end for providing said breakup element.

3. The device of claim 1 further characterized in that said partition includes an axially extending annular skirt forming said valve seat portion and disposed within said casing portion, and said valve portion comprises a tapered plug portion carried at the outer end of said tubular member in downstream coaxial relation to said skirt.

4. The device of claim 3 further characterized in that said skirt is located concentrically within said casing portion with an annular space therebetween and said air inlet ports are located in the wall of said casing in communication with said annular space and said mixing zone, said ports being shielded by said skirt.

5. The device of claim 3 further characterized in that 7 said breakup element comprises a radially slotted disk carried at the outermost end of said tubular member.

References Cited in the fiie of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,120,620 Mowery June 14, 1938 2,247,310 Rockwood June 24, 1941 2,347,476 Graham Apr. 25, 1944 2,474,332 Scuito June 28, 1949

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2120620 *Mar 27, 1936Jun 14, 1938John N MowerySprinkler head
US2247310 *Jun 29, 1938Jun 24, 1941Gifford D DavisShampoo apparatus
US2347476 *May 28, 1943Apr 25, 1944Graham Harry DHose nozzle
US2474332 *Jan 11, 1946Jun 28, 1949Sciuto Carl CSpray nozzle
US2564060 *Apr 8, 1947Aug 14, 1951Edwin G GettinsAeration sprinkler
US2565554 *Apr 30, 1949Aug 28, 1951Wrightway Engineering CoAerating shower head
US2568515 *Jan 2, 1947Sep 18, 1951Albert T ScheiwerCombined nozzle and coupling member
US2697638 *Dec 1, 1953Dec 21, 1954Robert R AngerNozzle
US2778620 *Sep 30, 1953Jan 22, 1957Joseph J GoodrieWater aerating devices
US2837323 *Jun 16, 1955Jun 3, 1958Wrightway Engineering CoHose nozzle with aerator
GB698691A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3009653 *May 6, 1960Nov 21, 1961Hedeman Robert MMulti-flavor drink dispenser
US3055436 *Jul 27, 1959Sep 25, 1962Lancia Angelo NinoFire extinguishing device
US3063258 *Nov 29, 1960Nov 13, 1962Gen Dynamics CorpMethod of flash cooling vehicle cargo spaces
US3082960 *Dec 27, 1960Mar 26, 1963Swan Harold AFire hose nozzle
US3163363 *Dec 10, 1962Dec 29, 1964Travis Ralph LCombination fog, straight stream, and spray nozzle
US3241773 *Feb 14, 1964Mar 22, 1966Travis Ralph LCombination hose nozzle
US3334818 *Sep 22, 1965Aug 8, 1967Alfred M MoenSwivel spray aerators
US4382044 *Jun 19, 1981May 3, 1983Carroll ShelbyWater purification system employing ozone injection
US4477026 *Sep 30, 1982Oct 16, 1984Imperial Underground Sprinkler Co.For use in impregnating irrigation water with air
US5382389 *Oct 25, 1993Jan 17, 1995Goodine; AllenFoam producing venturi and method of using same
US7971609 *Feb 7, 2005Jul 5, 2011Jvl Engineering Pte Ltd.Water saving device
US8051861 *Jan 13, 2006Nov 8, 2011Tennant CompanyCleaning system utilizing purified water
US8430023 *Feb 17, 2011Apr 30, 2013India HynesAdjustable wine aerator
US20110271846 *Feb 17, 2011Nov 10, 2011Epicureanist LlcAdjustable wine aerator
EP1447161A1 *Feb 14, 2003Aug 18, 2004Alcan Technology & Management Ltd.Spray nozzle
WO1988006492A1 *Jan 14, 1988Sep 7, 1988Gilbert Cyril CrouchA hose attachment
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/428.5, 239/417, 239/506, 239/458, 239/520, 239/408
International ClassificationE03C1/02, A62C31/00, B05B7/04, E03C1/084, B05B1/00, B05B1/26, B05B1/12
Cooperative ClassificationB05B7/04, B05B1/265, E03C1/084, B05B1/12, A62C31/005
European ClassificationB05B1/26A1, A62C31/00B, B05B1/12, E03C1/084, B05B7/04