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Publication numberUS2942115 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 21, 1960
Filing dateNov 7, 1955
Priority dateNov 7, 1955
Publication numberUS 2942115 A, US 2942115A, US-A-2942115, US2942115 A, US2942115A
InventorsThomas J O'connell
Original AssigneeThomas J O'connell
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Non-permanent radiation shield structure
US 2942115 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 21, 1960 T. J. OCONNELL 2,942,115

NON-PERMANENT RADIATION SHIELD STRUCTURE Filed Nov. 7, 1955 INVENTOR THOMAS J. OCONNELL BY Wfl7W/W Wi ATTORNEYS NON-PERMANENT RADIATION SHIELD STRUCTURE Thomas J. OConnell, Clinton, Md., assignor to the United States of America as represented by the Secretary of the Navy Filed Nov. 7, 1955, set. No. 545,583

4 Claims. c1. 250-108) (Granted under Title 35, ascent 1952 sec. 266) The invention described herein may be manufactured andnsed by or for the Government of the United States of America for governmental purposes without the payment of any royalties thereon or there'for.-

The present invention relates to interlocking shielding blocks and more particularly to a movable, non-permanent radiation shield structure for hot laboratories or tion and also thick enough to support itself. These blocks have matching male and female surfaces such that they do not need any extra material between the joints to maintain the blocks in a desired position or to prevent radiation from penetrating the joints: An object ofthe present invention is to form a movable, non-permanentradiation shield structure. A further object of the present invention is to'provide a non-permanent shield structure which is self-supporting.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a radiation shield structure with a plurality of interlocking faces along adjoining end surfaces.

A still furthe hobjectof. the present invention is to pros vide a shield block structure with adjoining surfaces which interlock on; turning cornersas .wellas along a straight line; wall. H I

Other and more specific objects of this invention will become apparent; upon a careful; consideration of the following detailed description when taken together withthe accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a sectional view through a preferred modification of this invention,

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of a partial shield structure comprising blocks as shown in the modification (Fig. 1),

Fig. 3 is a sectional view through another modification, and

Fig. 4 .is a perspective view of a partial shield structure comprising blocks as shown inthe modification (Fig. 3).

Referring to the shield structure as shown in Figs. 1 and 2 there are blocks 10 made of cement of any other desired radiation absorption material. -The blocks 10 have straight edge vertical-and horizontal surfaces, vertical end surfaces 11 and 12 of each block are provided with a plurality of equal rectangular faces of which the illustrated block has three faces on each end surface, the ends forming respectively male and female end surfaces. The three faces on the male end surface are formed parallel with the faces on the female surface wherein the central face is formed at a 90 degree angle to the side surfaces and the other two faces on each end are formed at 45 degree angles to the side surface and meeting the 2 central face wherein a 135 degree angle is formed between any two faces of each respective end. When placed end to end, successive blocks interfit with surface 11,"the male end, of one block adjoining surface 12, the female end, of the next successive block to form an interlocking joint to eliminate through cracks at the joints. The construction of the end surfaces of the blocks are for stability and to insure against any radiation passing therethrough. I

It is obvious that radiation would enter the smallest crack between end surfaces but this would' be prevented from penetrating the block by'the thickness of the block at the point the radiation hits the block. As shown at -9 in Fig. 1; the thickness of the block in a straight line from the point that radiation entering the" crack hits the block is the same distance to a side'surfac'e as the thickness of the block; therefore, any radiation entering the crack would be shielded from passing through the block since it cannot turn the corner to follow the crack. The faces of surface 12 fits along the faces of surface 11 in such a manner that radiation cannot pass because the radiation cannot bend around the angular'corner of the joint formed by the adjoining faces of the two end -sur.- faces. When turning corners one block is positioned at a 45 angle with its preceding adjacent block and the next block is positioned at a 45 angle to that block, this I with eight sides having an angle of 135 between adjacent explained above. It is obvious that the polyhedron must have a certain width across opposite faces and the block 22 must be the same width but there is no-l-imit to the length between the surfaces 23 and 24 since it is the faces of the surfaces 23 and 24 that must interlock with the matching faces of the polyhedron and be equal thereto.

The, faces of surfaces'23 and 24 are cut or formed with the central faces at a degree angle to the side surfaces and the outer two faces areon degree angle, such that, they converge.towardthe.centralface to form female end surfaces. These end faces then match the faces on the polyhedron to make a radiation shielding joint. The polyhedron 21 in effect forms two male surfaces that mates with the ends of two adjacent female end surfaces of two separate blocks 22.

In each of the modifications shown the block surface comprising the faces must be vertical and the height is limited by the thickness, to be self-supporting. The blocks can be made for any desired height and thickness, the thickness being preferably large enough to make the assembled shield self-supporting. The blocks are placed with their matching interlocking male and female faces together and since the faces fit so closely together in an interlocking position the shield will be self-supporting without bonding the matching surfaces; therefore, the shield can be a non-permanent structure and adjusted to changing requirements.

The blocks are positioned end to end with the male and female surfaces matching to form a joint that will shield radiation. In the modification shown in Figs. 1 and 2 all blocks have the same shape and opposite faces on each end surface are made parallel; so, when the blocks 3 are positioned end to end the male and female faces match and interlock to form a close fit. In the modification of Figs. 3 and 4, alternate blocks have the same configuration and theaface-surfaces of one block matches the {face surface of'the adjacent block. -In this modification J is necessary'to have two different shaped blocks whereas, in the modification of Figs. 1 and 2, each block has the sameconfiguration and the end of one block matches .an end of another like block. The angle of the faces are qsuchthat in turning corners the blocks are positioned at 45 degree angles :toeach-other and it is necessary to make two such angular joints to complete a 90 degree .turn. This shield structure can be quickly disassembled or 'any portion could be changed by merely removing *blocks at thcidesired location without interfering with the remaining blocks- ZIn-event the blocks :are made of cement or a like material the blocks can include reinforcing rods .cast into the column itself toaid the column in supporting its own weight while in anuprightpcsition; also, reinforcing beads may be inserted along the outer surface edges of the end surfaces to prevent chipping, etc. Eye bolts or eye bolt receptacles may be cast on the center of gravity axis to facilitate movement with a crane.

Obviously many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in the light of the above teaching. ,It is therefore to be understood, that within the St ope of the appended claims, the invention may be practifi d Otherwise than as specifically described.

What is claimed is:

1,. A movable, non-permanent, self-supporting shield structure for harmful radiation comprising radiation ab.- sorption blocks having substantially parallel side surfaces and rnatching male and female end surfaces each :formed by at least three equiangularlydisposed rectangular faces of equal dimensions, the angles between adjacent faces at the end surfaces being equal to about 135 degrees, the angle formed by a side .and the adjacent faces on the male end surface being about 135 and the angle formed by a side and the adjacent end surface of the female .end surface being about 45, said male and female end surfaces of said absorption blocks being adapted to be Positinned innlatching end to end abutting relationship with their center lines linearly disposed to form a straight uniform Wall surface and adapted to be matched angularly at their end surfaces relative to each other to form a second wall structure with abutting surfaces disposed at an angle to said first mentioned wall surface to provide a radiation shield structure with no through cracks, said matching end surfaces providing sufficient thickness at t l -til junction to prevent radiation passage through the crack at the abutting end surfaces.

2,. A movable, -non-perrnanent, self-supporting shield structure for harmful radiation comprising radiation absorption blocks each having substantially parallel side surfaces and male and female end surfaces, said male and female surfaces being formed by at least three equiangularly disposed rectangular faces of equal dimensions and disposed at an angle of about degrees relative to each other, said absorption blocks adapted to be placed in a matching end to end abutting position with their center lines linearly disposed to form a straight wall structure and adapted to be angularly'disposed relative to each other in an abutting position to form asecend wall surface at an angle to said first mentioned wall surface to -provide a radiation shield structure with no through cracks, said matching end surfaces providing sufficient thickness at their junction to prevent radiation passage-through the crack at theabutting end surfaces.

3. A movable, non-permanent, self-supporting shield structure for harmful radiation comprising first and second radiation absorption blocks having matching male and female end surfaces with each of said blocks having substantially parallel side surfaces, 'said male surfaces being formed on the end surfaces of said first block, said female surfaces being formed on the end surfaces of said second block, said and surfaces 'on each of said blocks being formed by at least three equiangularly disposed" rectangular faces of equal dimensions and disposed at an angle 'of about 135 degrees relative to each other, said blocks vadapted to be alternately positioned in matching end to end abutting relationship with their center lines linear-1y disposed to form a straight uniform wall surface and adapted to be positioned angularly in matching abutting relationship to form a second wall surface angle to said first mentioned wall surface to provide a radiation shield structure with no through cracks, said m'atc'hinglend surfaces providing sufficient "thickness at their junction to prevent radiation passage thr'oughtbe crack at the abutting end surfaces.

.4. A movable, non-permanent, self-supporting shield structure for harmful radiation as claimed in claim 1 in which each of s'aidblocks includes an eye bolt in the upper surface on the center of gravity axis to facilitate mavement of said blocks.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS OTHER REFERENCES ODonnell, abstract of Serial ,No. 593,511, 'publishe d January 1, 1952,-654-O.G. 321.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3256440 *Dec 20, 1961Jun 14, 1966Virgil StarkDevices for protection against radioactive fallout
US3614446 *Oct 10, 1967Oct 19, 1971Charles LeutholdProtective brick against radioactive radiations
US3995165 *Dec 9, 1974Nov 30, 1976L. & C. Steinmuller GmbhMethod of and device for screening the source of rays dangerous to human health
US4001998 *Dec 1, 1975Jan 11, 1977Horst W. PollehnPre-fabricated structural elements and method of assembling the same
US4153845 *Aug 24, 1976May 8, 1979Lawrence FavaTransparent radiation wall
US4227968 *Jan 5, 1979Oct 14, 1980Siempelkamp Giesserei GmbhPressure vessel assembly for high-temperature nuclear reactor
US4546583 *Dec 5, 1983Oct 15, 1985Gary HussarModular building construction system
US4588955 *Jun 1, 1983May 13, 1986The United States Of America As Represented By The United States Department Of EnergyTransverse field focused system
US4638166 *Mar 1, 1985Jan 20, 1987Proto-Power CorporationRadiation shield
US4655997 *Nov 25, 1983Apr 7, 1987National Nuclear Corporation LimitedThermal insulation for roof of concrete containment
US4996813 *Sep 21, 1989Mar 5, 1991Kliethermes Jr John CSound block
US5241573 *Jan 8, 1992Aug 31, 1993Thacker Michael SShield apparatus
US5384997 *May 18, 1992Jan 31, 1995The Burns & Russell CompanyColumn and corner composite, mold and method for producing glazed unit for such
US5398474 *Dec 6, 1993Mar 21, 1995The Burns & Russell CompanyWall corner composite, mold and method for producing glazed unit for such
US5536111 *Sep 27, 1994Jul 16, 1996Doernemann; JarettAdjustable erosion control wall
US5548936 *Feb 27, 1995Aug 27, 1996The Burns & Russell Company Of Baltimore CityComposite for turning a corner or forming a column, mold and method for producing glazed unit for such
US6051185 *Dec 18, 1996Apr 18, 2000Sterigenics InternationalApparatus for performing gamma irradiation
US6606835 *Dec 31, 2001Aug 19, 2003Augustin J. BilkaBlocks and walls constructed therewith
US6907705Feb 21, 2003Jun 21, 2005Innovative Concrete Solutions, Inc.Reversible wall block, block wall, and method of wall construction
US7168218Jun 11, 2004Jan 30, 2007David Stalder SpratlenMortarless fence block system
US7667214 *May 4, 2005Feb 23, 2010Worldwide Innovations & Technologies, Inc.Radiation attenuation system
EP0328285A2 *Jan 31, 1989Aug 16, 1989United Kingdom Atomic Energy AuthorityRadioactive waste storage system
Classifications
U.S. Classification250/517.1, 376/287, 976/DIG.340, D25/58, 428/911, 52/284, 52/608, 52/604, D25/113, D24/158
International ClassificationG21F3/04
Cooperative ClassificationY10S428/911, G21F3/04
European ClassificationG21F3/04