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Publication numberUS2943243 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 28, 1960
Filing dateMar 13, 1957
Priority dateMar 13, 1957
Publication numberUS 2943243 A, US 2943243A, US-A-2943243, US2943243 A, US2943243A
InventorsRachman Isadore B, Sidney Bobb
Original AssigneeH & L Realty Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wheeled base for electrical instrument or the like
US 2943243 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 28, 1960 1. B. RACHMAN EFAL 2,943,243

WHEELED BASE FOR ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENT OR THE LIKE Filed March 13, 1957 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 jzwerzi 'rs Isadore B. Rae fiman June 28, 1960 l. B. RACHMAN ETAL 2,943,243

WHEELED BASE FOR ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENT OR THE LIKE Filed March 13, 1957 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 04 S H3 -ns IrwEflfDr-S fsaoore 8.3116521? an June 1960 1. B. RACHMAN ETAL 2,943,243

WHEELED BASE FOR ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENT OR THE LIKE Filed March 13, 1957 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Stldzzeg 5056 United States Patent WHEELED BASE FOR ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENT OR THE LIKE Isadore B. Rachman and Sidney Bobb, Philadelphia, Pa., assignors, =by mesne assignments, to H & L Realty 'Corp., Philadelphia, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed Mar. 13, 1957, Ser. No. 645,751

6 Claims. (Cl. 317--99) The present invention relates generally to bases or supports and more particularly to movable bases or supports intended to hold scientific instruments or the like in convenient position for observation and operation.

An object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved construction for a base or support and more particularly a movable base or support for scientific instruments or the like. Another object of the present invention is to provide a wheeled base or support for scientific instruments or the like which can be quickly, easily and inexpensively produced from prefabricated parts, including sheet metal stampings and other standard or easy to fabricate parts and structural elements, and which is constructed and arranged to support the instrument or the like at optimum, and optionally adjustable, position for observation and operation. A further object of this invention is to provide a base or support of the character referred to which also provides safe and accessible storage space for interchangeable elements and spare parts for the scientific instrument or the like being supported. Still another object of this invention is to provide novel means for adjusting the position of the scientific instrument or the like to the particular position best suited to provide optimum observation and control depending on the position of the operator relative to the instrument.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention are apparent in the following detailed description, appended claims and accompanying drawings.

For the purpose of illustrating the invention, there are shown in the accompanying drawings forms thereof which are presently preferred; it being understood however that this invention is not limited to the precise arrangements and instrumentalities disclosed.

Referring to the accompanying drawings in which like reference characters indicate like parts throughout:

Figure 1 is a front perspective view, on a reduced scale, showing an oscilloscope base or support forming one embodiment of the present invention; the base being shown as supporting a complete oscilloscope and also holding an extra interchangeable control unit for the oscilloscope.

Figure 2 is a rear perspective View, on an enlarged scale, of the embodiment of Fig. 1; the oscilloscope and connecting electrical wires being shown in dash-dot lines.

Figure 3 is a fragmentary elevational view looking from the side of Fig. 1; parts being broken away better to reveal the construction.

Figure 4 is a fragmentary front perspective view, generally like that of. Fig. 1 but on an enlarged scale and with the oscilloscope and extra control unit removed.

Figure 5 is a perspective view of one of the leg members.

Figure .6 is a rear perspective View, generally like that of Fig. 2, but showing another embodiment of the inventi on.

' Figure 7 is a vertical cross-sectional view taken generally along the line 7-7 of Fig. 6.

Figure 8 is a horizontal cross-sectional view taken generally along the line 8-8 of Fig. 6.

Figure 9 is a fragmentary front perspective view of the embodiment of Fig. 6, showing the more nearly upright position of the oscilloscope obtained by raising of the rear adjusting mechanism.

Figure 10 is a perspective view, generally like that of Fig. 2 but showing still another embodiment of this invention.

Figure 11 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view taken generally along the line 11--11 of Fig. 10.

Figure 12 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view taken generally along the line 1212 of Fig. 10.

According to one embodiment of the present invention, shown in Figs. 1-5, we may provide a wheeled base or support for a scientific instrument, as for example a conventional oscilloscope 20 having a self-contained removable control unit, for example a pre-amplifier unit, 22 of the plug-in type which can be removed and replaced by a similar interchangeable unit simply by disconnecting an elongated screw-threaded fastening rod 24 whose outer end is provided with an enlarged polygonal head 26 accessible from the front panel 28 of the oscilloscope housing or case 30, as indicated in Fig. 1, and whose inner screw-threaded end screws into an appropriate threaded socket (not shown) provided within the housing 30 to the rear of the unit 22; the elongated fastening rod 24 passing through aligned openings (not shown) provided in the unit 22 slightly above its bottom.

The base or support includes an upper body 32 of sheet metal or the like which may be open at the bottom and includes a front wall 34, best shown in Fig. 4, a back wall 36, best shown in Fig. 2, complementary left and right side Walls 38, and a top wall 40.

The bottom edges of the walls 34, 36 and 38 lie in the same horizontal plane. However, the top edge of the front wall 34 is appreciably higher than the top edge of the back wall 36, while the top edges of the side walls 38 are inclined downwardly and rearwardly from the front wall to the back Wall. Thus, the top wall 40 (which is peripherally supported on the top edges of the vertical walls 34, 36 and 38) lies in a plane which is tilted downwardly and rearwardly from the front wall to the back wall.

Fastened, by screws or otherwise, to the top wall 40 along its back edge are two channel members 42 and 44, with a gap or clearance 46 provided tlierebetween, as best shown in Fig. 2. The upstanding walls (which are normal to the top wall 40) of the channel members 42 and 44 provide supporting surfaces or shoulders for the bottom rear edge of the oscilloscope housing 30, when said housing is placed upon said wall 40, as indicated in Figs. 1, 2 and 3.

The channel member 42 is longer than the channel member 44 so that the gap 46 between them is somewhat ofi center, for example nearer the right side wall of the body 32. The gap is simply to provide clearance for one or more wires leading from power outlets on the back wall to power inlets on the back of the oscilloscope housing 30, so that the relative size of the members 42 and 44 can be varied to place the gap at the point most convenient for the particular make of oscilloscope or other scientific instrument being supported.

Also fastened, by screws or otherwise, to the top wall 40 are left and right side channel members 48, which extend longitudinally along the top wall 40 from its front edge rearwardly to the back channel members 42 and 4'4. The upstanding walls of the side channel members 48 provide supporting surfaces or shoulders for the bottom side edges of the oscilloscope housing 30 and prevent the oscilloscope from slipping olf either side of the body 30 or shifting transversely relative thereto. Strips of rubher 50 may optionally be cemented or otherwise fastened to the top wall 40 adjoining the inner faces of the upstanding walls of the channel members 42, 44 and 48 to provide a shock-absorbing peripheral zone intermediate the top wall 40 and the bottom of the oscilloscope housing 30.

The back wall 36 is provided with a power input socket 52 and a plurality (for example three) of power outlet sockets 54, which may be vertically aligned. When an electric cord 56 is connected between the input socket 52 and an electrical outlet (not shown), it energizes the outlet sockets 54 so that power can be transmitted to the oscilloscope and elsewhere by one or more cords 58, as indicated in dash-dot lines in Fig. 2.

As indicated in Figs; 1 and 4, a pull handle60 may be attached tothe front wall 34 near its top edge and a pair of compartments 62' may be provided, side-byside, for safe storage of additional interchangeable units 22; one such additional unit being shown in the left-hand compartment 62 in Fig. 1 and also being shown in Fig. 3.

Each compartment 62 has a front opening or mouth 64 corresponding in shape to the unit 22, a floor 66, and an upturned flange or stop-shoulder 68 formed at the rear end of the floor 66. A threaded socket 70 is formed in the flange or stop-shoulder 68; the socket being constructed and arranged to receive the threaded inner end of the fastening rod 24. Thus, the additional interchangeable unit 22 can be quickly and easily locked securely in place within the compartment 62 when it is not being used in the oscilloscope. Of course, a second additional unit 22 can be locked within the other storage compartment by simply providing still another fastening rod 24.

The body 32 is supported upon four identical angle iron legs 72, one of which is shown disconnected in Fig. 5. The upper end of each leg, which fits within the body 32 at one of the four corners thereof, is provided with three holes 74 vertically spaced along one of its walls and three similar vertically spaced holes 74 along its other Wall. This permits any of the legs to be positioned interchangeably at any corner of the body 32, with two fastening bolts 76 passing through aligned holes in the back wall 36 or front wall 34 and a single fastening bolt 76 passing through an aligned hole in the side wall 38 (and through the corresponding hole or holes in the juxtaposed wall of the leg).

The lower end of each leg is swivelably mounted upon a caster unit which includes a relatively large Wheel 78 and an upstanding angle iron portion 80 which fits inside the leg and is secured thereto by bolts 82 passing through aligned openings in the juxtaposed walls of the leg and the portion 80.

Two of the caster units 84A may be provided with foot-operated locking brakes 86 of conventional construction mounted on the yoke portions 88, while the remaining two caster un 84B have no brakes. The brakes 86, When locked in conventional manner (with a' shoe portion bearing against the rim of the caster wheel) prevents accidental shifting of the base or support from its desired position. While the brake-containing caster units 84A have been shown as mounted on the legs fastened to the front wall 34, this could be reversed to place the units 84A on the legs fastened to the back Wall 36 instead. It is also possible to equip all four of the legs 72 with brake-containing caster units 84A for greater resistance to shifting, if desired.

1 ,A shelf or pan 90 may be horizontally mounted upon the legs 72 in a plane vertically intermediate the lower edge of the base body 32 and the bottom ends of the legs. The shelf 90 which is useful for holding tools, papers and the like may be of sheet metal with generally rectangular configuration and with four upturned flanges 92 whose ends are fastened to the legs 72 by bolts 94 which pass through aligned holes formed in the juxtaposed portions of the leg walls and shelf flanges.

As indicated in Fig. 1, the downward and rearward inclination of the top wall 40 (upon which the oscilloscope rests) results in the front panel 28 (and its viewing elements and controls) being disposed generally in a plane more or less normal or perpendicular to the line of sight of an operator whose eyes are at an appreciably higher level (by reason of the fact that he is standing or is seated on a tall stool or the like). The particular angle at which the top wall 40 is inclined downwardly and rearwardly from the horizontal (and hence the angle at which the front panel 28 of the generally rectangular oscilloscope case 30 is inclined rearwardly from the vertical) can be set to fit the particular conditions under which the base is to be used. In most cases, the angle can vary from about 45 degrees to about 15 degrees.

In Figs. 6 to 9, there is shown a modified embodiment of this invention, which permits adjustment of the angle at which the oscilloscope or other instrument is supported.

In this embodiment, members 42, 44'and 48 and rubber strips 50 are eliminated from the top wall 40 of the base body 32. Instead, a supporting frame 96 is mounted along the front of the wall 40 by a piano hinge 98. The frame 96 is generally U-shaped with side members 100 extending rearwardly from the hinge 98 and a rear member 102 interconnecting the rear ends of the side members. Each of the members 100 and 102 is of angle iron or the like with an upstanding wall 104 and a generally horizontal bottom wall 106, along which extends a strip 108 of shock-absorbing material, such as rubber. The frame 96 is constructed and arranged tov receive and support the case or housing 30 of the oscilloscope or other instrument. Thus, the rubber-covered bottom walls 106 provide underlying support for the peripheral bottom edges of the case 30, While the upstanding walls 104 prevent lateral or rearward shifting of said case. If desired, the frame 96 could also be provided with a front member (not shown) of similar angle iron construction to prevent forward shifting of the case 30 when, as will be described, the support is adjusted to incline the case front panel forwardly.

A plate 110 is secured to the underside of the bottom wall 106 of the rear frame member 102, as indicated in Figs. 6 and 7; the plate being wider than the member and protruding fore and aft therebeyond. The plate is provided with a pair of spaced parallel grooves extending fore-and-aft to receive a bail or handle as will be described. Fastened to the underside of the plate 110, laterally intermediate the grooves, is an open-ended channel member 1 11 of C-shaped cross-section and inwardly directed lower flanges 113 which extend fore-and-aft relative to the plate 110. Disposed within the channel member is the upper end of a flat supporting bar 112,-having a pin 114 extending transversely therethrough.

The protruding ends of the transverse pin 114 rest on, and are supported by, the inwardly directed flanges 113 of the channel member 111. Extending downwardly from a point somewhat below the upper end of the bar 112, there are a series of spaced holes 116 formed in the bar.

A wire bail or handle 118 is horizontally disposed intermediate the plate 110 and the underside of the bottom wall 106 of the member 102. The bail is generally U-shaped with parallel legs 120 seated within the grooves in the plate. The free ends 122 of said legs 120 are bent, forwardly of the plate 110 to provide astop. The connecting portion 124 of the bail can be pulled out for use as indicated in Fig. 6, and also shown in solid lines in Fig. 7, or can be pushed into flush position when not needed as shown in dash-dot lines in Fig. 7.

Mounted on the outside of the body back wall 36 is a vertically disposed open-ended collar member 126 of generally U-shaped cross-section with an outermost base wall 128, parallel side walls 130, and diverging flanges 132 at the edges of said walls 130. The member 126 is of appreciably thicker and stronger metal than the sheet metal of the body 32. A backing plate 134, also of thicker metal, is disposed on the inside of the body back wall 36. Bolts 136 fasten the member 126 to the backing plate 134; the bolts passing through aligned holes in the ends of the flanges 132, in the intervening sheet metal wall 36, and in the corners of the plate 134, as best indicated in Fig. 8.

The collar member 126 provides a sleeve through which the supporting bar 112 extends and can be moved vertically so as to raise or lower the rear edge of the frame 96 and thereby change its tilt. The horizontal component of travel of the pivoted frame 96 is compensated for by the relative movement of the channel member 111 and the bar pin 1 14 during arcuate motion of the rear frame member 102.

The base wall 128 of the collar member 126 is pro vided with a hole 138, nearer its upper end, corresponding in size with the supporting bar holes 116 and positioned so that, as the supporting bar 112 is shifted vertically relative to the collar member 126, successive holes 116 come into alignment with the hole 138. The wall 36 has a similar aligned hole 139.

The backing plate 134 is provided with a somewhat smaller threaded hole or socket 140 which is in alignment with the hole 138.

A fastening bolt 142 having a polygonal head 144 and a stem 146 which is threaded at its free end as at 148, is constructed and arranged to be inserted through the aligned holes 138 and 116 and 139 (which are somewhat oversize relative to the bolt stem i146) and to have its threaded end 148 detachably connected to the threaded hole or socket 140 in the backing plate 134, as indicated in Figs. 7 and 8, so as releasably to lock the supporting bar 112 in any one of a plurality of vertically raised or lowered positions relative to the collar member 126 and the top wall 40. Obviously, as the frame 96 is raised (by the bail 118) from its lowermost position (wherein it is parallel to and more or less adjacent the top wall 40) its downward and rearward angle of inclination is reduced, until, in the position shown in Fig. 6, and also shown in solid lines in Fig. 9, the frame has almost reached horizontal position and the front panel 28 of the oscilloscope housing is only slightly rearwardly inclined from the vertical. This accommodates an operator whose eyes are at a level only slightly higher than that of the instrument.

By raising the frame 96 even higher, it can be made to reach a position in which it is inclined slightly upwardly and rearwardly, thereby giving the oscilloscope front panel 28 a slight forward inclination to accommodate an operator whose eyes are at a lower level. This lastmentioned position is indicated in dash-dot lines in Fig. 9.

It is apparent that, in order to change the angle of inclination of the frame 96 and the oscilloscope front panel 28, the operator simply holds the bail 118 (to support the rear end of the frame 96) with one hand and, with the other hand, unscrews and removes the fastening bolt 142, after which the bail is raised or lowered to the desired position, wherein a different one of the vertically spaced holes 116 in the bar 112 is in alignment with the holes 138, 139 and 149. The fastening bolt 142 is then reinserted through the holes 138, 116, and 139 and screwed into the hole 140 to secure the frame 96 in its new position. The bail can then be pushed into the flush position shown in dash-dot lines in Fig. 7 to move it out of the way.

The use of relatively heavy and strong metal or the like for the collar member 126 and the backing plate 134 is desirable because the relatively thin sheet metal of the body wall 36 would not ordinarily have suflicient strength to carry the substantial load of the frame 96, the bar 112, and the oscilloscope 20.

As shown in Fig. 9, this embodiment too is provided 6 With storage compartments 62, within which extra interchangeable pie-amplifier units 22 or the like can be securely mounted when not inserted into the oscilloscope; one such unit being shown inserted into one of the compartments 62, in Fig. 9.

Except as hereinabove distinguished, the embodiment of Figs. 6-9 resembles that of Figs. 1-5 described above.

It can be seen that, while more complicated and expensive than the embodiment of Figs. 1-5, the embodiment of Figs. 6-9 has the considerable advantage of permitting ready adjustment of the angle of inclination of the front panel of the oscilloscope to provide optimum viewing and operating position regardless of the position of the operator relative to the oscilloscope.

In Figs. 10, 11 and 12, there is shown still another embodiment of the present invention, wherein the oscilloscope is held in somewhat different, generally enclosed and flush relationship with the base body 32.

Thus, in this embodiment, the top wall 40-A of the body 32-A is formed with a large generally rectangular opening adapted to permit insertion thereinto of the oscilloscope case 30. Integrally formed depending flanges or skirt portions .150 are formed along the side edges of the rectangular opening, while similar depending flanges or skirt portions 152 are formed along the front and rear edges of the opening. The skirt portions 150 and 152, whose side edges are inclined as indicated in Fig. 10 to permit the skirt portions to be struck out integrally from the top wall 41 (during formation of the rectangular opening), serve to provide additional support for the juxtaposed outer surface of the oscilloscope case 31!, as indicated in the sectional views of Figs. 11 and 12 According to this embodiment, the front panel 28-A of the oscilloscope is oversize relative to the remainder of the case 39 to provide a peripheral shoulder or flange 154 which overlies the edges of the rectangular opening in the top wall 40 A, as shown in Figs. 11 and 12. The peripheral shoulder 154 may be detachably secured to the top panel 40-A in any suitable manner, for example by means of screws 156 passing through holes at the corners, as indicated in Fig. 10.

In this embodiment, the narrower body wall 36 becomes the front wall (to which the pull handle 60 may optionally be attached), while the wider body wall 34 becomes the back wall; the oscilloscope panel 28-A now being rotated degrees from the position of the embodiment of Fig. 1.

The body wall 34 may be provided with storage compartments (not shown) like those of the embodiment of Figs 1-5. The power sockets 52 and 54 may be retained on the wall 36, as shown in Fig. 10, or instead they may be shifted to the wall 34 to move the electrical cords out of the way of the operator, In Fig. 10, the breaking caster units 84-A are shown as mounted on the same legs 72 as in the previously described embodiments, that is the legs fastened to the wall 34. Thus, the stabilizing braking action is now exerted at the rear of the wheeled base. Of course, the caster units 84-A and 84B could be interchanged to provide braking at the front of the base.

To provide space for the storage compartments 62 in the wall 34, the vertical dimension of the body 32 can be made sufficiently large to accommodate the compartments below the level of the bottom of the tipped oscilloscope case 30. The compartments 62 can also be located in the wall 36; the front-to-rear dimension of the body 32 being increased somewhat if necessary to accommodate the compartments in front of the tipped oscilloscope case 30.

The front panel 28-A of the oscilloscope case 30 may be provided with a pair of handles 158, whereby the oscilloscope can be conveniently lifted and removed from the body 32, after removal of the screws 156.

The principal advantage of this embodiment is the fact that the oscilloscope is now supported in enclosed flush position relative to the base body 32, thereby protecting it more effectively from dirt and accidental injury.

The present invention may be embodied in other specific forms and, therefore, the above-described embodiments are to be considered in all respects merely as illustrative and not restrictive; reference being made to the appended claims as indicating the scope of this invention.

Having thus described our invention, we claim as new and desire to protect by Letters Patent the following:

1. A base or support for a self-contained electrical instrument or the like comprising an upper body of generally hollow sheet metal construction having a top wall which is inclined from the horizontal at an angle of not more than 45 degrees and also having four vertical walls depending from the top wall and meeting each other generally at right angles, two of said vertical walls being complementary side walls and the remaining two vertical walls being front and back walls of which one has a greater vertical dimension than the other and extends upward to the higher edge of the inclined top wall; four leg members having their upper ends secured to the corners of the body and depending vertically therefrom and serving to support said body in elevated position; a swivelable caster unit or the like mounted at the lower end of each leg member; and a supporting frame hingedly mounted at the upper edge of the inclined top wall and extending along the side edges and the lower edge of the top wall, said frame being constructed and arranged to underlie and support the peripheral bottom edges of the electrical instrument, adjustable supporting means being provided for the lower edge of the frame whereby said edge can be raised from a position generally adjacent the lower edge of the inclined top wall of the base to a position appreciably elevated relative thereto, thereby to change the angle of inclination of the frame and the instrument resting thereon.

2. A construction according to claim 1 wherein the normally lower free edge of the frame can be raised to a level higher than the upper edge of the inclined top wall so as to provide opposite inclination for the instrument, and wherein the supporting frame can be releasably locked in any of a plurality of differently inclined positions.

3. A construction according to claim 1 wherein the supporting means for the frame comprises a vertical bar or the like having a series of vertically spaced holes formed therein, means for connecting the upper end of the bar to the lower edge of the frame, and means for releasably securing the bar to the narrower vertical wall of the body at the level of any one of the holes in said bar, said last-mentioned releasable securing means including a pair of spaced vertical members mounted upon the aforesaid narrower vertical body wall and constructed and arranged to provide a collar or the like through which the bar extends, said spaced members having horizontally aligned holes formed therein, and a bolt or the like constructed and arranged to be removably inserted into said aligned holes and through one of the holes in the intervening bar.

4. A construction according to claim 3 wherein the connecting means for the upper end of the bar is con- 8 structed and arranged to permit horizontal shifting of the frame edge relative to the bar during arcuate movement of the frame about its hinge, said bar being maintained in vertical position by the spaced vertical members between which the bar extends.

5. A construction according to claim 4 wherein the upper connecting means for the bar includes a channel member of generally C-shaped cross-section with lowermost inwardly-directed flanges, said channel member being mounted on the underside of the frame edge and is disposed in a front-to-back direction, and wherein the upper end of the bar extends into said channel member intermediate the flanges, the upper end of the bar being provided with a pair of laterally diverging horizontalpins which extend above and rest upon the flanges of the channel member. 7

6. A base or support for a self-contained electrical instrument or the like comprising an upper body of generally hollow sheet metal construction having a top wall which is inclined from the horizontal at an angle of not more than 45 degrees and also having four vertical walls depending from the top wall and meeting. each other generally at right angles, two of said vertical walls being complementary side walls and the remaining two vertical walls being front and back walls of which one has a greater vertical dimension than the other and extends upward to the higher edge of the inclined top wall; an opening in the top wall into which the instrument fits in substantially enclosed relationship with the front panel of the instrument substantially flush with and parallel to the inclined top wall; the front panel of the instrument being provided with a protruding peripheral flange overlying the peripheral edges of the top wall opening; screws extending through the corners of the instrument front panel flange to the underlying body top wall for removably fastening the front panel of the instrument to the top wall; the top wall of the body being provided with interval depending flanges at the edges of the opening, said flanges being constructed and arranged to abut and support the adjoining surfaces of the enclosed instrument; four leg members having their upper ends secured to the corners of the body and depending vertically therefrom and serving to support said body in elevated positions; and a swivelable caster unit or the like mounted at the lower end of each leg member.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNiTED STATES PATENTS OTHER REFERENCES Tektronix Publication, page 10; January, 1950. Publication-Tektronix, Inc., March 2, 1956.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3596630 *Feb 27, 1970Aug 3, 1971Honeywell IncCalibrating knob for control device
US6095156 *Oct 7, 1999Aug 1, 2000Smith, Ii; Leonard RayBeauty utility cart with sterilizer
US6694896Oct 5, 2001Feb 24, 2004Lee J. MilazzoFoldable table or desk
US8485614 *Oct 28, 2010Jul 16, 2013Metal Fabricating CorporationBase stand with drawer
US20110148264 *Oct 28, 2010Jun 23, 2011Golias Jr Bernard JBase stand with drawer
Classifications
U.S. Classification361/600, 312/313, 312/280, 296/22, 174/560
International ClassificationA47B37/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47B37/00
European ClassificationA47B37/00