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Publication numberUS2945372 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 19, 1960
Filing dateMar 3, 1958
Priority dateMar 3, 1958
Publication numberUS 2945372 A, US 2945372A, US-A-2945372, US2945372 A, US2945372A
InventorsReed Roland D
Original AssigneeEvelyn Reed, Phyllis R Gunter
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Door latch mechanism
US 2945372 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 19, 1960 R. D. REED DOOR-LATCH MECHANISM 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 3, 1958 IN V EN TOR. fofmza fl Feed July 19, 1960 R. D. REED DOOR LATCH MECHANISM 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 3, 1958 m T. m m

July 19, 1960 R. D. REED 2,945,372

DOOR LATCH MECHANISM Filed March 3, 1958 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR.

July 19, 1960 R. D. REED 2,945,372

DOOR LATCH MECHANISM Filed March 3, 1958 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 United States Patent DOOR LATCH MECHANISM Roland D. Reed, Rensselaer, Ind., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Evelyn Reed and Phyllis R. Gunter Filed Mar. 3, 1958, Ser. No. 718,917

11 Claims. (Cl. 70-92) The present invention relates to door latch mechanisms and in particular to a new and improved panic or emergency exit latch mechanism. This application is a continuation-in-part of my application Serial No. 471,- 689, filed November 29, 1954, and now abandoned.

Panic locks or latch mechanisms are used in schools, factories, theaters, halls, churches and other buildings where it is customary to assemble large numbers of people to permit the gathered people to open the doors from within the building, for exit purposes, usually in an emergency, even though the doors be locked against entrance from the outside. Designed for installation on an outwardly swinging door of a building, a panic lock or latch of this character includes an actuator of substantial size disposed on the side of the door which faces the interior of the building when the door is closed. Preferably, the actuator extends across the major portion of the width of the door. In any event, the actuator is operative through the panic latch to unlock the door upon movement of the actuator toward the door by an individual or by the outwardly surging force of an alarmed crowd.

To facilitate passage in either direction through a door at hours when the door locking action of a panic lock on the door is unnecessary, it is desirable to equip the panic lock with dogging structure for temporarily holding the lock in inoperative position. Panic locks of this character, including the dogging means used to hold the locks in inoperative position, are subject to great stress and severe abuse in the public and semipublic buildings in which they are installed most commonly.

One object of the invention is to provide an improved panic lock of the above character in which a unique and highly simplified construction aflords exceptional strength capacity in operation and provides for convenient dogging of the lock in unlocked position in a manner which renders it virtually immune to damage from abuse.

Another obect is to provide an improved panic lock as recited in the previous object in which operation of a simple dogging control renders the lock actuator temporarily rigid with the lock and hence rigid with the door to which the lock is attached, thereby facilitating use of the actuator for swinging the door and increasing the inherent resistance of the lock to abuse. A related object is to minimize the actuator movement required for normal operation of the lock.

A further object is to provide the features recited in the above objects in a panic lock having an improved and exceptionally compact construction which is particularly well adapted to be mounted on a narrow door stile.

An additional object is to provide an improved panic lock as recited in the previous objects in which the working parts are mounted in a casing in such manner that neither the support nor the operation of the working parts is disturbed by removal of a casing cover which fully exposes all the internal structure of the lock.

Another object is to provide a new and improved panic lock which is simple and rugged in its construction, is inexpensive to manufacture, and is easily mounted on a door.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a pair of doors equipped with the panic lock of the present invention;

Fig. 2 is an elevational view, partially broken away and into section, of one panic lock illustrated in door-locking position;

Fig. 3 is a plan view, with the case cover broken away and showing the bolt in locking position;

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 3 but showing the bolt in dogged or retracted position;

Fig. 5 is a horizontal sectional view taken substantially in the plane of the actuator bar and showing the bolt in dogged or retracted position;

Fig. 6 is a vertical sectional view taken substantially along the line 66 of Fig. 3, looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 7 is a vertical sectional view taken substantially along the irregular line 7-7 of Fig. 3, looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 8 is a vertical sectional view taken substantially along the line 8-8 of Fig. 3, looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 9 is a perspective View of a typical key used to operate the dogging mechanism;

Fig. 10 is an elevational view showing a modified embodiment of the invention, partially sectioned, mounted on a narrow door stile;

Fig. 11 is a vertical sectional view of the modified structure taken along the line 11-11 of Fig. 10;

Fig. 12 is a transverse sectional view taken along the line 12-42 of Fig. 10;

Fig. 13 is a transverse sectional view taken along the line 1313 of Fig. 10;

Fig. 14 is a longitudinal sectional view taken along the line 14-14 of Fig. 13 and showing the positions of internal parts when the lock is dogged in unlocked position; and

Fig. 15 is a transverse sectional view taken along the line 15-15 of Fig. 14.

In the drawings the panic lock is indicated in its entirety by the reference character 10 and is applied to an exit door 12 mounted in a suitable and conventional casement 14. The panic lock includes a locking mechanism 16, a keeper 18 which is mounted on door jamb 20, and an actuating member 22.

The operating mechanism 16 is mounted in a casing 24 which includes a base 26 and a removable cover 28 which may be bronze castings. The base which has a generally rectangular shape is fastened to the outer stile 30 of the door 12 by wood screws 32 extending through bottom portion 25 of the base 26 adjacent the four corners thereof. The base includes a pair of outstanding end walls 34 and 36, the end wall 36 having an aperture 38 to accommodate bolt 40. The shape of the end walls is most clearly seen in Figs. 6 and 8, and each has a pair of concave edges 35 terminating in short straight edges 37 at the bottom portion 25. The end wall 34 is also apertured opposite the aperture 38, at 42, to accommodate lever 44 of the actuating means 22. The base is provided with a pair of brackets or shelves 46 extending between and integral with the walls 34 and 36 and having an inner irregular edge 48 spaced from the bottom of the base 26, as most clearly seen in Fig. 4. The shelves or bracket members 46 are disposed in a horizontal position parallel to the floor and are spaced apart a distance equal to the vertical dimension of the openings 38 and 42.

The cover 28 has a flat outer portion 29 integral with concavely curved portions 62 which fit snugly against the end wall curves 35. Short straight sides 31 fit against the wall edges 37, and the cover 28 is removably secured to the base 26 by four screws 33 threaded through suitable apertures in the side 31 and into the bottom portion 25 of the base.

The bolt 40 is formed with an inner recess 50 (Fig. to define a bottom lip 52 for engagement with the keeper 18, and with an upper lip or shoulder 54 (Fig. 5) facing toward said casing base 26. At the juncture between the faces of the bolt 40 and the lip 54 a pivot pin 56 extends through an aperture 58 in the bolt and through corresponding aligned apertures 60 in the shelves 46 to mount the bolt 40 therebetween for pivotal movement on a vertical axis. The pin 56 is prevented from falling free of the shelves 46 by the arcuate portions 62 of the casing cover 28. It is not essential, therefore, that the pin 56 have a drive fit with either the locking bolt 40 or the shelves 46.

The bolt 40 is biased to locking position by a coil spring 63 carried on a rod 64 and acting between a bifurcated lug 66, outstanding from the base bottom 25, and the side wall 68 of the bolt 40. The forward end of the rod 64 is pivotally connected to the bolt 40 by a pivot pin or screw 70, and at its opposite end is provided with a push plate or head 72. The outer movement of the rod 64 under the influence of the biasing spring 62 is limited by projecting finger 136 of a key-operated cam 74 which lies between the bifurcated lug 66 and the push plate 72. The function of this cam 74 will be described hereinafter. A washer 76 interposed between the spring 62 and the bifurcated lug 66 prevents the spring from becoming entangled or engaged therewith.

The locking bolt 40 is retracted from locking position by the actuating lever 44 which has a forwardly extending finger or tongue 78 projecting into the bolt recess 50 and engaging beneath the lip 54 and an outwardly extending arm 80 which projects through an opening 82 in the cover 28 and the opening 42 in the wall 34. The lever 44 is pivoted to the shelves 46 by a vertical pivot pin 84 which extends through an aperture 86 in the lever and aligned apertures 88 in the shelves 46. The pin 84, like the pin 56, is prevented from falling free of the shelves by the curved portion 62 of the cover 28. It will be noted that the pivot pin 84 lies between the finger or tongue 78 and the arm 80 of the lever and on an axis parallel to the pivotal axis of the bolt 40.

The lever is biased in such direction as to move the arm 80 away from the face of the door and the tongue or finger toward the bottom of the casing by a spring 89 confined between a spring keeper 90 formed on the bottom 25 of the casing and a spring keeper 92 on the inner face of the lever 44, the spring acting at a point on that side of the axis of the pivot pin 84 away from the finger 78 and toward the arm 80 thereof. It will be observed that the effect of the biasing spring 89 is the same as that of the biasing spring 62, that is, to move the operative parts of the panic bolt in such direction that the bolt 40 is moved into locking position (Fig. 3). It is clear, of course, that since the bolt 40 and lever 44 are not physically interconnected or tied together, the bolt 40 may be moved from locking position to retracted position to permit the door to close as the lip 54 lifts away from the tongue or finger 78.

The outer end of the actuating lever 44 is bifurcated at 94 to receive between the arms thereof tongue 96 of an actuating bar 98, the bar 98 being pivoted to the lever 44 by a pin 100 extending through aligned holes in the parts 94 and 96 and fixed to one of them by a set screw (not shown). It is preferred that the actuating bar 98 be tubular and that the tongue 96 be formed on a fi g 102 secured to that end of the bar 98 adjacent the actuating lever 44. The opposite end of the bar 98 is fitted into a socket 102 formed on a pedestal 104 secured by screws 106 to the inner stile 108 of the door 12. Fig. 2 clearly shows that the bar 98 has a sloppy or loose fit within the socket 102, so that a slight amount of lateral motion is permitted together with the longitudinal motion of the bar.

It is clear that when anyone presses against the lever 44 or the bar 98, these two elements will move directly toward the door 12 in a horizontal plane parallel to the floor, and that this movement is accompanied by a lifting or outward movement of the tongue 78 to retract the bolt 40 from locking position and to permit the door to be swung outwardly. A simple action is thereby provided with a direct connection between the actuating lever 44 and the locking bolt 40 to effect an easy opening of the door.

It is frequently desirable that the locking bolt 40 be secured in retracted position. This is particularly desirable when the panic bolt is mounted on doors in a school building which serve for two-way trafiic. In such cases the doors would have conventional closing devices on them and would be provided with handles on their outer faces for ordinary uses. However, if the doors are to function for two-way traffic, the panic lock must be rendered temporarily inoperative to lock the door.

The present invention contemplates the use of a novel dogging device 110, shown as an Allen screw 112, screwed into a threaded aperture 114 in the tongue portion of the lever 44 between the tip of the tongue and the pivot pin 84 with the inner end of the screw adapted to abut against an upstanding boss or pillar 116 integral with the base bottom 25 (Fig. 5). The boss is formed with an inclined face 118 against which the outer end of the screw 112 may bear. The screw 112 is prevented from complete withdrawal from the lever 14 by upsetting or marring the threads of the aperture 114 at 120. When the screw 112 is turned inwardly, so as to project a substantial distance into the casing 24 from the inner face of the tongue 78, the tongue 78 is pushed outwardly, thereby pulling the bolt 40 in the clockwise direction about the pivot pin 56 as seen in Figs. 3, 4 and 5, the latter two figures showing the bolt in retracted or dogged position in which the bolt lip 52 positively engages the side of the pillar 116.

Fig. 9 shows a key 122 having a hexagonally shaped shank 124 and a flat end 126 which is adapted to be carried by the custodian of the building who will screw the Allen screw into the lever 44 when it is desired temporarily to render the panic bolt inoperative by retracting the bolt 40, and will screw it outwardly when it is desired to lock the building against ingress.

An Allen screw is shown in the drawings because it is a well known type of screw. However, it is likely that different types of screws would be used in order to prevent vandals from using a wrench to set the Allen screw in the position shown in Fig. 5, and therefore the key 122 could be made to complement the shape of the screw 112.

The locking bolt 40 can be operated by a conventional key-operated cylinder or barrel lock 128 mounted in opening 130 in the door stile 30, which has a rearwardly projecting tongue 132 engaged in a slot 134 in the cam 74, the cam being formed with a finger 136 which lies between the bifurcated lug 66 and the push plate 72 on the rod 64. When the tongue 132 is turned in the clockwise direction (Fig. 7), the push plate 72 is moved to the right, the rod 64 is withdrawn, and the bolt 40 is retracted. This permits the door to be opened.

The cylinder lock is mounted by means of screws 138 on a conventional mounting plate 140 which is accommodated within a recess 142 in the door side face of the case bottom 25. As seen in Fig. 5, the cam 74 is formed with a sleeve bearing 144 so that it is freely rotatably .5 mounted in the case bottom 25 and is not readily disengaged therefrom. It will also be noted that this cam 74 has a simple action with respect to the bolt 40, acting directly upon the head 72 of the rod 64 which is pivotally connected at its opposite end to the bolt 40.

The panic lock is readily mounted on the door 12, and the only holes that must be made are those for the cylinder 128 and the mounting screws 32 and 106. The cylinder 128 is mounted first so that the tongue 132 projects from the inner face of the door. The pedestal 104 is mounted on the door stile 108, and the casing base 26 and the complete operating mechanism 16 are mounted on the stile 30, care being taken to insert the far end of the actuating bar 98 into the socket 102 and the tongue 132 into the slot 134. Lastly, the cover 28 is secured to the base 26 to enclose the operating parts. The keeper 18 may be mounted on the jamb either before or after mounting the device on the door. It takes but a very few minutes to mount the panic lock 10 in position for use. One of the advantages of this panic lock is that it can easily be a replacement for one of the devices now in use because no modification of the door structure is required.

It is believed the operation of the panic lock 10 is readily understood from the foregoing description, and that it is appreciated that the objectives claimed for the device are attained.

A modified embodiment 150 of the invention, shown in Figs. 10 to 14, is provided by an exceptionally compact construction which is particularly well adapted for mounting on a very narrow door stile 152, Fig. 10. As will presently appear, the working parts of the modified lock 150 are supported in a very narrow, elongated casing 154 which is mounted on the door stile 152 so that the casing extends longitudinally alongside the keeper edge of the stile (the left edge in Fig. 10). As will presently appear, the horizontal or transverse Width of the casing 154 is limited internally to the minimum space required .to accommodate a swinging bolt 156 which coacts with a keeper (not shown) generally similar to the keeper 18 shown in Fig. 3.

The casing 154 itself comprises a narrow rectangular base 158 secured to the stile 152 by screws 160, Figs. 10, 11, and 14, located inwardly of the peripheral edge of the base. The longitudinal side edge of the base 158 adjacent to the keeper edge of the door stile 152 is integral with a longitudinal side wall 162 of the casing which extends outwardly from the .base as shown in Figs. 10, 11, and 13. A central notch 164 in the casing side wall 162 extends all the way down to the base 158, as shown in Figs. 10 to 12, .and has substantial width just suflicient to accommodate the previously mentioned bolt 156.

In general, the construction. and shaping of the bolt 156, Fig. 12, is similar to that of the bolt 40, Fig. 5, used in the previously described form of the invention. A pivot pin 166 in an outer apex of the bolt 156 is supported at opposite ends, Figs. 10 to 12, in a pair of bracket lugs or supports 168 integral with the outer edge of the casing side wall 162 and projecting over the base 158 on opposite sides of the notch 164. Centrally recessed from the side opposite the keeper side 162 of the casing, the dog 156 extends from the pivot 166 toward the base 158 as shown in Figs. 12 and 15. The base end of the dog is formed by an arcuate abutment 170 defining an .arcuate keeper abutting surface 172 facing generally toward base 158 and having a center of curvature coinciding with the axis of the dog pivot 166. The keeper abutment portion 170 of the dog is reenforced at its lower edge by a narrow horizontal web 173 and at its upper edge by a wider horizontal web 174, both webs forming parts of the dog as shown in Fig. 14.

Thus supported on the pivot 166, the dog 156 is swingable between an operative keeper engaging position, Fig. 12, in which substantially the entire abutment portion 170 projects beyond the base 158, and an inoperative or retracted position, Fig. 15, in which the dog is swung into the casing 154 so that it does not project beyond the casing wall 162. The dog 156 is urged outwardly to its operative position, Fig. 12, by a coiled compression spring 176 which engages a medial portion of the dog just below the upper web 174, Fig. 14. The opposite end of the spring 176 engages a spring seat 178 formed on a portion of the base 158 aligned with the dog and projecting outwardly from the side of the base opposite the casing side wall 162, as shown in Figs. 11 and 12.

Outward swinging movement of the dog 156 is terminated by an upwardly projecting stud 180 on the base end of the web 174 which engages the free end of an unlocking arm 182 that rests against the casing side wall 162. The opposite end of the arm 182 connects with the operating tongue 184 which projects centrally through the upper portion of the base 158 from a cylinder lock 186 in the door stile, Fig. 11. Counterclockwise rotation of the tongue 184, Fig. 10, causes the arm 182 to swing the dog 156 inwardly to its retracted position.

Aside from the auxiliary unlocking action of the cylinder lock 186, the bolt 156 is swung inwardly to its retracted position by the direct positive action on the bolt of a lock operating lever 188 swingably mounted on one end of the base 158 opposite the arm 182 for pivotal movement about an axis perpendicular to the bolt pivot pin 166.

As shown in Figs. 10, 11, 13, and 14, a flat, rounded fulcrum portion .190 of the lever 188 is received in an outwardly open longitudinal notch 192 in the lower end wall 194 of the casing 154. The thickness of the wall 194 longitudinally along the base 158, Fig. 14, is approximately equal to the transverse width of the base, Fig. 10. Portions of the end wall 194 on opposite sides of the slot 192, Fig. 13, form supports for opposite ends of a heavy pivot pin 196 extending through the fulcrum portion of the lever 188.

From the fulcrum portion 190, one end of the lever 188 extends outwardly from the casing 154 and longitudinally beyond the casing in a direction opposite from the bolt 154, as shown in Figs. 10 and 11, to connect with a horizontal actuator or handle 198. The opposite or bolt end of the lever 188 is shaped as shown in Figs. 11 and 14 to form a sturdy bolt releasing finger 200 which projects from the fulcrum portion 190 of the lever into underlying relation to an actuating shoulder 202 on the bolt 156. The shoulder 202 is located between the bolt webs 172, 174 and projects over the base 158 in generally parallel relation to the keeper abutment 170 on the bolt.

It is particularly noteworthy that the lever finger 200 is elongated to the extent that the distance from the axis of the lever pivot 196 to the area of contact between the finger 200 and the bolt shoulder 202, Fig. 14, is substantially three times the distance from this same contact area to the axis of the bolt pivot 166, Fig. 15. Consequently the angle through which the lever 188 must be swung about the pivot 196 to retract the bolt 156 from its fully extended position is reduced approximately to one-third of the angle of movement of the bolt between its operative and inoperative positions.

The lever 188 is biased clockwise in a bolt extending direction, Fig. 11, by a compression spring 204, Figs. 11 and 13, located within a recess 206 in the end Wall 194. One end of the spring 204 reacts against a protruding portion 208 of the base 158, while the other end of the spring engages a spring seat 210 formed on the edge of the lever fulcrum portion 190 which faces the base 158.

Like the first form of the invention previously de scribed, this modified form of the invention can be rigidly dogged in inoperative position in a manner which positively eliminates lost motion or movement of the basic working parts of the lock. For this purpose a dogging screw 212 is threaded through a bore 214 extending through the fulcrum portion 190 of the lever 188 toward the base 158 on the finger side of the pivot pin 196, as shown in Figs. 11 and 14. The outer end of the key 212 is socketed for rotation by the key 122, Fig. 9. To dog the lock in released position, the screw 212 is rotated to engage an opposing portion of the base 158 and swing the finger 200 outwardly to the position shown in Figs. 14 and 15. This action swings the dog 156 inwardly until the keeper abutment 170 engages an abutment portion 216 of the base 158, which projects outwardly on the side edge of the base opposite the side wall 162, Figs. 12 and 15. Thus the mutual engagement of the dog abutment 170 and base abutment 2'16 positively limits inward movement of the dog and positively stops swinging movement of the lever 188 by the screw 212 which positively engages the base 158. In this manner both the lever 188 and the dog 156 are rigidly held in fixed positions by structure rigid with the base 158.

At the upper end of the casing 154 a thin end wall 218 integral with the base 156 extends outwardly only part way to the outer edge of the casing side wall 162.

The casing 154 is completed by a removable cover 220 which includes a side member 222 extending longitudinally between the end walls 194 and 218 of the easing, an end element 224 (Fig. 14) complementing and extending the previously mentioned end element 218, and a fiat top plate 226 overlying the casing side 162 and extending across the casing in parallel relation to the base 158. A slot 228 in one end of the cover plate 226 provides clearance for the lever 188 as shown in Fig. 10.

Preferably opposite side walls and opposite end walls of the casing 154 are inclined toward each other from the base 158 to the top plate 226 as shown in Figs. 10, 11 and 12. It is noteworthy that the overall size of this attractive casing 154, which is particularly well suited for mounting on a narrow door stile, is minimized to the extent that the height and width of the casing are only slightly greater than the corresponding dimensions of the locking dog 156 as this element appears in Fig. 15.

Moreover, it is evident that upon removal of the easing cover 220 the working parts of the lock remain fully supported on the base 158 and fully operative while at the same time being fully exposed for inspection and servicing in the unlikely event that it should be necessary.

While I have shown preferred embodiments of my invention, it will be apparent that variations and modifications thereof may be made without departing from the underlying principles and scope of the invention. I therefore desire, by the following claims, to include all such variations and modifications by which substantially the results of my invention may be obtained through the use of substantially the same or equivalent means.

I claim:

1. A panic lock for exit doors, comprising a casing having a base adapted to be secured to a door and having a pair of horizontally disposed shelves, a locking bolt, means pivotally mounting said locking bolt between said shelves, means biasing said bolt to project from said easing into locking position, an actuating lever, means pivotally mounting said actuating lever between said shelves, said locking bolt having an inwardly facing recess bounded by an overchanging lip and said actuating lever having a forwardly extending tongue projecting into said recess and engageable with the underside of said lip, said actuating lever having an arm projecting from said casing on that side of its pivotal mounting opposite said tongue which, when depressed, causes said tongue to withdraw said bolt from locking position, means acting between said actuating lever and said casing base biasing said lever to locking position, an upstanding boss on said base adjacent said actuating lever tongue, and a key operated member threaded through said tongue and movable against said boss to cause said tongue to withdraw said bolt and to hold it in withdrawn position.

2. In a panic lock for exit doors, the combination comprising, a mounting bracket adapted to be secured to a door, a locking bolt pivotally mounted on said bracket on a first fixed axis, an actuating lever pivotally mounted on said bracket on a second fixed axis and having a finger engageable with said bolt and movable away from the door to withdraw said bolt from locking position, means biasing said bolt to locking position, and a dogging device carried by said finger and movable to one position to move said finger away from the door and to hold said bolt in withdrawn position, said dogging device comprising a screw threaded through said finger and a fixed part on said bracket against which an end of said screw acts when turned in such direction as to move said finger away from the door.

3. In a panic lock for exit doors, the combination comprising a casing including a vertical base having a keeper end thereof and extending rearwardly from the said keeper end, support means integrally formed on said base and projecting rigidly from one side thereof, a locking bolt located generally at said keeper end of said base, a pivot swingably supporting one end of said bolt on said support means in spaced relation to said base, said bolt extending from said pivot therefor toward said base, the base end of said bolt defining a keeper engaging surface generally perpendicular to a radial line from said pivot, a spring mounted on said base and interconnected with the base end of said bolt to urge the latter to a locking position projecting beyond the keeper end of said base, said bolt being swingable rearwardly from said locking position to an unlocking position retracted substantially within said casing, an abutment pillar integral with said base and projecting rigidly from said one side thereof in the path of rearward swinging movement of said bolt to positively engage the rear side of the base end of said bolt upon retraction of the bolt to said unlocking position thereof, an operating lever, a pivot on a medial portion of said lever swingably supporting the lever on said support means rearwardly of said bolt pivot, said bolt defining an actuating shoulder thereon located rearwardly of said bolt pivot and facing toward said base, said shoulder having a radial spacing from said bolt pivot which is less than half the distance between said bolt pivot and said lever pivot, said lever having a finger projecting into engagement with the base side of said bolt shoulder, a dog threaded into said lever on the finger side of said lever pivot and oriented to project upon rotation of the dog into positive engagement with said pillar to pivot said finger away from said base and swing said bolt rearwardly into positive engagement with said pillar whereby both said bolt and said lever are rigidly secured against swinging movement in either direction about the respective axes thereof, and said lever including an actuating arm projecting rearwardly from said casing in generally parallel relation to said base.

4. In a panic lock for exit doors, the combination comprising a casing including a vertical base, support means integrally formed on said base and projecting rigidly from one side thereof, a locking bolt located generally at a forward end of said base, a pivot swingably supporting one end of said bolt on said support means in spaced relation to said base, said bolt extending from said pivot therefor toward said base, the base end of said bolt defining a keeper engaging surface thereon, a spring mounted on said base and interconnected with said bolt to urge the base end thereof to a locking position projecting beyond said forward end of said base, said bolt being swingable rearwardly from said locking position to an unlocking position retracted substantially within said casing, abutment means integral with said base and projecting rigidly from said one side thereof, said abutment means having at least a portion thereof located to positively engage the rear side of the base end of said bolt upon retraction of the latter to said unlocking position, an operating lever, a pivot on a medial portion of said lever swingably supporting the lever on said support means rearwardly of said bolt pivot, said bolt defining an actuating shoulder thereon located rearwardly of said bolt pivot and facing toward said base, said shoulder having a radial spacing from said bolt pivot which is less than the distance between said lever pivot and said shoulder when said bolt is in said unlocking position, said lever having a finger projecting into engagement with the base side of said bolt shoulder, a dog carried by said lever on the finger side of said lever pivot and selectively movable into positive engagement with said abutment means to rigidly hold said finger away from said base and to rigidly hold said bolt in positive engagement with said abutment means, and said lever including an actuating arm projecting from said casing.

5. In a panic lock for exit doors, the combination comprising a casing including a vertical base, support means integrally formed on said base and projecting rigidly from one side thereof, a locking bolt located generally at a forward end of said base, a pivot swingably supporting one end of said bolt on said support means in spaced relation to said base, said bolt extending from said pivot therefor toward said base, the base end of said bolt defining a keeper engaging surface thereon, spring means mounted on said base and interconnected with said bolt to urge the base end thereof forwardly to a locking position projecting beyond said forward end of said base, said bolt being swingable rearwardly from said locking position to an unlocking position retracted substantially within said casing, abutment means integral with said base and projecting rigidly from said one side thereof, said abutment means having at least a portion thereof located to positively engage the rear side of the base end of said bolt upon retraction of the latter to said unlocking position, said bolt defining an actuating shoulder thereon located rearwardly of said bolt pivot and facing toward said base, an operating lever, a pivot on the medial portion of said lever swingably supporting the lever on said support means rearwardly of said bolt pivot, said lever having a finger projecting into engagement with the base side of said bolt shoulder, a dog threaded into said lever on the finger side of said lever pivot and oriented to project upon rotation of the dog into positive engagement with said abutment means to pivot said finger away from said base and swing said bolt into positive engagement with said abutment means whereby both said bolt and said lever are rigidly secured against swinging movement in either direction about the respective axes thereof, and said lever including an actuating arm projecting from said casing.

6. A panic lock comprising, in combination, a base, a detachable cover therefor, a locking bolt defining a keeper engaging surface on one end thereof, pivot means on said base independent of said detachable cover and supporting said bolt for swinging movement between a retracted position and an extended position in which the keeper engaging surface end of the bolt protrudes beyond the base, spring means supported by said base and coacting with said bolt to urge the latter to said extended position thereof, said bolt including an actuating shoulder thereon, said bolt shoulder and said extended position of the bolt being located on opposite sides of said bolt pivot means, an actuating lever, pivot means on said base pivotally supporting said lever, said lever including a handle projecting away from said base, a finger on said lever extending from said lever pivot means into underlying relation to said bolt actuating shoulder and coacting with said bolt actuating shoulder to urge said bolt to said retracted position, and a dogging element threaded through said lever on the finger side of said pivot means therefor to engage fixed structure on said base and move said finger against said shoulder to swing said bolt into its retracted position and rigidly to hold it in fully retracted position by pressure of said dogging element against said base structure.

7. A panic lock comprising, in combination, a base, a locking bolt swingably mounted on said base for movement between a retracted position and a keeper engaging position projecting beyond the base, an actuating shoulder on said bolt, an operating lever pivotally mounted on said base, said lever including a handle portion projecting away from said base and a finger extending into engagement with said bolt shoulder to swing the bolt to its retracted position as an incident to swinging of said lever which moves said finger against said shoulder, a dogging element threadedly supported through said lever for engagement with structure on said base to react on the lever and swing the latter in a direction which retracts said bolt and rigidly to hold said bolt in fully retracted position by pressure of said dogging element against said base structure, and spring means interconnected with said bolt to urge the latter toward said extended position thereof.

8. A panic lock comprising, in combination, a base, a locking bolt swingably mounted on said base for movement between a retracted position and a keeper engaging position projecting beyond the base, an actuating shoulder on said bolt, an operating lever pivotally mounted on said base, said lever including a handle portion projecting away from said base and a finger extending into engagement with said bolt shoulder to swing the bolt to its retracted position as an incident to swinging of said lever which moves said finger against said shoulder, a dogging element threadedly supported through said lever for engagement with structure on said base to react on the lever and swing the latter in a direction which retracts said bolt, said base including rigid stop means positioned to engage said bolt when the latter is in fully retracted position thereof and positively preclude further retracting movement of the dog, whereby said stop means and the pressure of said dogging element against said base structure rigidly hold said bolt in said fully retracted position, and spring means coacting with said bolt to urge the latter toward said extended position thereof.

9. A panic lock comprising, in combination, a casing including a base and a detachable cover therefor, a bolt defining a keeper engaging abutment thereon, pivot means supporting said bolt on said base independently of said cover for swinging movement between a retracted position within said casing and an extended position in which said abutment extends beyond said casing, an actuating shoulder on said bolt, an operating lever, means pivotally supporting said lever on said base independently of said cover for swinging movement about a pivotal axis, said lever including a handle portion projecting away from said casing, said cover having an opening through which said lever extends, a finger on said lever projecting into side engagement with said bolt shoulder to swing said bolt toward said retracted position upon swinging of said lever in one direction, spring means supported on said base independently of said cover and coacting with said bolt to urge the latter toward said extended position thereof, said base including a stop thereon positioned to engage said bolt when the latter is in fully retracted position and positively to preclude further retraction of the bolt, and a manually operable dogging element carried by said lever on the finger side of said lever axis for engagement with structure on said base to react on said lever positively to hold said bolt against said stop, access to said dogging element being had through said cover opening.

10. A panic lock for doors having narrow stiles comprising, in combination, a narrow rectangular casing including a base and a cover therefor, a locking bolt, means projecting from said base and pivotally supporting said bolt for swinging movement about an axis spaced from said base and extending along one longitudinal side of said casing in parallel relation thereto, said bolt extending from said axis toward said base and defining a keeper engaging abutment on the base end thereof, a spring coacting with said bolt to urge the latter toward an extended position in which said abutment extends beyond said casing, a manual operating lever, means on one end of said base pivotally supporting said lever for swinging movement about an axis generally perpendicular to said bolt axis, said lever including a handle portion projecting away from said casing, a shoulder on said bolt, a finger on said lever projecting into side engagement with said shoulder to swing said bolt inwardly to a retracted position within said casing as an incident to swinging of the lever in one direction, and a dogging element carried by said lever on the finger side of its pivotal axis for engagement with fixed structure on said base to react on the lever to hold the latter in an extreme position in said one direction which holds said bolt in said retracted position.

11. A panic lock for doors having narrow stiles comprising, in combination, a narrow rectangular casing including a base and a cover therefor, a locking bolt, means projecting from said base and pivotally supporting said bolt independently of said cover for swinging movement about an axis spaced from said base and extending along one longitudinal side of said casing in parallel relation thereto, said bolt extending from said axis toward said base and defining a keeper engaging abutment on the. base end thereof, a spring coacting with said bolt to urge the latter toward an extended position in which said abutment extends beyond said casing, a manual operating lever, means on one end of said base pivotally supporting said lever for swinging movement about an axis generally perpendicular to said bolt axis, said lever including a handle portion projecting away from said casing, a shoulder on said bolt extending to the side of said bolt axis generally opposite from said one longitudinal side of said casing, a finger on said lever projecting into underlying engagement with said shoulder to swing said bolt inwardly to a retracted position within said casing as an incident to swinging of said lever which moves said finger outwardly from the base, said base including a rigid stop thereon positioned for engagement by said bolt when the latter is in fully retracted position to positively preclude further retraction of the bolt, and a dogging screw threaded through said lever on the finger side of the lever axis for engagement with fixed structure on said base to react on the lever to hold said finger outwardly from said base in a position which holds said bolt in positive engagement with said stop.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,067,241 Foss July 15, 1913 1,357,007 Smith Oct. 26, 1920 1,721,489 Prinzler July 16, 1929 1,898,505 Soemer Feb. 21, 1933 2,350,092 Bock May 30, 1944 2,752,773 Abelson et a1. July 3, 1956

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3025095 *Apr 25, 1960Mar 13, 1962Christensen Donald CBar-type door opener
US3271982 *Aug 14, 1964Sep 13, 1966Emhart CorpDoor lock
US3319986 *Feb 18, 1965May 16, 1967Emhart CorpTop latch unit
US3530695 *Jul 22, 1968Sep 29, 1970Emhart CorpDogging mechanism for emergency exit lock
US3614145 *Aug 19, 1970Oct 19, 1971Von Duprin IncDogging device for panic exit latch and actuator assembly
US4895399 *Mar 18, 1988Jan 23, 1990Blumcraft Of PittsburghPanic handle for doors
US5169185 *Mar 6, 1992Dec 8, 1992Republic Industries, Inc.Panic exit device featuring improved bar movement and fail safe dogging
US5340171 *Jan 22, 1992Aug 23, 1994Republic Industries, Inc.Door latch control apparatus with independent actuators
US6601881 *Oct 3, 2001Aug 5, 2003Julian MandellPush-action door release device and method of installing the same
US6953211 *Mar 31, 2003Oct 11, 2005Savio S.P.A.Anti-panic opening system for doors
US7000958 *Jan 20, 2004Feb 21, 2006Gilbert GarzaAssist device for a door handle and latch assembly
US8915523 *Oct 3, 2011Dec 23, 2014Scott Christopher TillmanPanic hardware dogging release device
US20030222461 *Mar 31, 2003Dec 4, 2003Savio S.P.A.Anti-panic opening system for doors
US20050156440 *Jan 20, 2004Jul 21, 2005Gilbert GarzaAssist device for a door handle and latch assembly
US20120133156 *Oct 3, 2011May 31, 2012Scott Christopher TillmanPanic Hardware Dogging Release Device
Classifications
U.S. Classification70/92, 292/92, 292/336.3, 292/226
International ClassificationE05B65/10
Cooperative ClassificationE05B65/1073, E05B65/1093, E05B65/1066
European ClassificationE05B65/10L2A, E05B65/10L2B