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Publication numberUS2945408 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 19, 1960
Filing dateMay 28, 1956
Priority dateMay 28, 1956
Publication numberUS 2945408 A, US 2945408A, US-A-2945408, US2945408 A, US2945408A
InventorsEdward H Terlinde
Original AssigneeEdward H Terlinde
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Harmonica and microphone pick-up therefor
US 2945408 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 1960 E. H. TERLINDE 2,945,408

HARMONICA AND MICROPHONE PICK-UP THEREFOR Filed May 28, 1956 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 4 INVENTOR Edward/6K m/lhde BY Wad ATTORNEY y 1960 E. H. TERLINDE 2,945,408

HARMONICA AND MICROPHONE PICK-UP THEREFOR 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 28, 1956 ATTORNEY United States Fatent O HARMONICA AND MICROPHONE PICK-UP THEREFOR Edward H. Terlinde, 184 W. 7th St., St. Paul 2, Minn.

Filed May 28, 1956, Ser. No. 587,602

4 Claims. (Cl. 841.04)

This invention relates to an improvement in electric harmonica and deals particularly with a support for use in conjunction with a harmonica and which embodies a microphone and a volume control, tone control, or both, which may be used in conjunction therewith.

During recent years it has become common practice for musicians to electrify musical instruments of various types. Electric harmonicas which include some means of picking up the sound from the reeds of the harmonica have been produced. For the most part, these instruments are extremely costly and are usually practical only for the most experienced harmonica players. Horn-type devices have been produced which may be attached to harmonicas of usual construction and which act to some extent to amplify the sound to some extent. However, a device of this type cannot produce the same results as a microphone or a similar apparatus which picks up the sound and directs it to an amplifier to produce sound of any desired volume. A purpose of the present invention lies in the provision of an attachment for a harmonica of usual design which transforms the microphone into an electric harmonica at relatively nominal cost.

A feature of the present invention lies in the fact that my electric harmonica has all of the desirable features of extremely expensive devices with few of the same disadvantages. The attachment is such that the sound issuing from the reeds of the harmonica pass into a horn-like body which may be provided with an open end and a closed opposite end. The microphone is preferably positioned adjoining the closed end of the horn-shaped body to pick up the sound and to direct the sound to a suitable amplifier. By placing one hand over the open end of the horn, the sound issuing from the harmonica may be suitably mufiied or muted to produce a variation in tones desired by the player.

'A further feature of the'present invention lies in the fact that the harmonica attachment is made so that it can be used in conjunction with harmonicas of various sizes and shapes. Harmonicas of the type used in conjunction with the attachment are usually made in substantially standard sizes, there being two common lengths and two common widths or thicknesses. The present attachment is designed to accommodate all of these common sizes.

A further feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a removable baffle which maybe used to blend the various sounds issuing from the reeds of the harmonica as they are directed toward the microphone. The microphone is usually located near the lower pitched reeds of the harmonica, and accordingly the sound waves from these reeds travel a shorter distance to the microphone than the higher pitched reeds of the harmonica. As the harmonica is positioned to direct the sound waves toward a longitudinal Wall of the horn-shaped body an effective blending of the tones may be accomplished. However, if the higher notes of the harmonica are to be emphasized, a diagonal baffle is provided within the hornshaped body, this bafile being closer to the harmonica at rims m2 ice 2 the end thereof where the higher notes are located and farther from the harmonica at the low note end thereof.

The baflle thus acts as a sounding board to reflect the sound waves toward the microphone in a manner to tend to emphasize the higher notes and to soften the force of the lower notes.

These and other objects and novel features of the present invention will be more clearly and fully set forth in the following specification and claims.

In the drawings forming a part of the specification:

Figure 1 is a longitudinal sectional view through my electric harmonica, showing the arrangement of parts therein.

. Figure 2 is a perspective view of the harmonica attachment with the harmonica omitted to better illustrate the construction thereof.

Figure 3 is a cross sectional view through the harmonica, the position of the section being indicated by the line 3-3 of Figure 1.

Figure 4 is a cross sectional view through the harmonica, the position of the section being indicated by the line 44 of Figure 1.

Figure 5 is a perspective View of an insert which may be added in the event a shorter harmonica unit is employed in conjunction with the attachment.

Figure 6 is a sectional view through a portion of the harmonica attachment showing a modified form of halide construction.

Figure 7 is a sectional view through a modified form of construction.

Figure 8 is an end View of the construction shown in Figure 7.

The electric harmonica is indicated in general by the letter A and includes a harmonica unit 10 and a harrnonica attachment 11. The harmonica unit 10 is of a common type sold in volume in music stores throughout the country. These harmonica units are usually in four common sizes, although professional models which are considerably more expensive vary from these common sizes. The present attachment is designed for use with harmonicas which are produced in the common sizes mentioned although, obviously it could be adapted to other shapes and sizes. The common sizes of harmonicas include units of two different lengths and units of two different thicknesses. The present attachment is designed to accommodate all of these sizes;

In general, the attachment 11 includes an elongated horn-shaped body which is usually provided with slightly tapered walls 12 although in some instances the bodies are cylindrical in form and are provided with a bell-shaped end. The elongated horn-shaped body is provided 'with an open end 13 usually provided with an encircling ringshaped reinforcing flange 14. The other end of the elongated body 12 is provided with a closed end 15.

A volume control unit 16 is mounted upon the closed end 15, such volume controls usually including a threaded shank 17 which extends through an axial aperture 19 in the closed end 15 and which is provided with a clamping nut 20 which acts to clamp the volume control in position. The shank 17 is usually tubular in form and accommodates a shaft 21 which may be rotated to change the volume. A knob 22 is mounted upon the shaft 21 to simplify the operation of this shaft.

An internally extending groove or head 23 encirclesinwardly extending head 23 to properly locate the microphone.

An expandable ring 27 which may be of elastic or resilient material is engaged between the microphone fiange 26 and the inwardly extending bead 24 to anchor the microphone in place. A rubber ring such as that commonly known as an O-ring has been found very effective for this purpose, as a ring of this type tends to lessen the vibration'between the horn-shaped body and the microphone.

As is indicated in Figures 2, 3 and 4 of the drawings, an elongated slot 29 is provided in the wall of the horn extending in a direction generally parallel tothe axis of the elongated body 12. This slot 29 is of proper length and width to accommodate the largest of the common sizes of harmonicas. As is indicated in Figures 1, 3 and 4 of the drawings, a strap 30 extends longitudinally of the slot129 and extends generally parallel to the axis of the tubular body 12. This strap 30 is connected at its ends by connecting portions 31 and 32 to the body 12 at the ends of the slot 29. In the event the horn-shaped body is formed of sheet metal, the strap 30 is formed by drawing inwardly a portion of the metal which would otherwise be cut away in the formation of the slot 29. The strap 30 is preferably no greater in width than the block-shaped body 3-3 to which the various reeds of the harmonica are secured so that this strap does not interfere with the passage of sound waves from the harmonica to the interior of the tubular body.

As is indicated in Figures 2, 3 and 4 of the drawings, an elongated flange or lip 34 extends along an edge of the slot 29, this lip 34 preferably extending outwardly from the body 12 and terminating in an inturned extremity 35 designed to engage against the surface of the harmonica It). The harmonica is usually provided with side plates 36 and 37 which diverge from the block-shaped body 33 toward the side of the harmonica from which the sound waves are emitted. Because of this arrangement, the harmonica unit may be grasped outwardly of the widest portion thereof and thereby held firmly in place.

An adjustable clamping plate 39 is supported on the tubular body 12 on the side thereof opposite the flange or lip 34. This clamping plate 39' is preferably shaped similarly to the flange or lip 34 and is designed to engage the opposite side of the harmonica unit 10. The clamping plate 39 is provided with an arcuate end 40 extending along the edge of the clamping plate opposite that which engages the surface of the harmonica. This end or edge 40 is of proper diameter to fit the surface of the tubular member 12. Clamping screws such as 41 extend through slots 42 in the clamping plate 39, the slots 42 extending transversely of the clamping plate. By tightening the clamping screws 41 the clamping plate will be held in proper position to clamp the surface of the harmonica regardless of variations in the thickness thereof.

A baffle 42 is provided which is designed to extend diagonally through most of the length of the body 12 from the open end 13 thereof to a point adjacent to the microphone 25. This baffle 42 is widest at its point of intersecting the axis of the body 12 and is rounded in such a manner as to be narrower at the ends to fit the contour of the inner surface of the body 12. The baffle 42 is preferably removably supported and is shown as being held in place by a pair of spaced indentations 43 extending into the interior of the body 12 near the microphone 25 and by a pair of somewhat similar indentations 44 near the open end 13 of the body 12. As long as the baffle 42 is held by the indentations 43 and 44, it cannot be withdrawn from the open end of the body 12 as the wider mid portion of the baflle is wider than the distance between the angularly spaced indentations 44. However, by flexing the partition 42 so that it is parallel to the axis of the body 12, it may be easily inserted or removed. If the body 12 is made of sheet material the body may flex sufiiciently to permit the insertion and removal of the partition 42. If.the body is made of relatively inflexible material, the partition 42 must be sufiiciently flexible to engage into place in the manner described.

The manner of operation of the apparatus is believed obvious from the foregoingdescription. The volume control 16 and the microphone 25 are suitably electrically connected and wires such as 45 lead through an aperture.

46 in the tubular body 12 to a suitable amplifier where the sound picked up by the microphone may be amplified. The harmonica is inserted in the slot 29 and the clamping plate 39 is adjusted so as to clamp the harmonica in place. In the playing of the instrument, one hand may be moved toward or way from the open end of the body 12 tendingto muffle or mute the sound at suitable'times or intervals.

In the event a shorter harmonica 10 is used, a plug such as 47 may be provided to fill the slot 29 throughout its length. This plug 47 is preferably similarly shaped in outline to the harmonica but may have its'outer surface 49 recessed below the outwardly projecting side of the harmonica if it is desired. The plug 47 may be held in place in the same manner as the harmonica itself.

In Figure 6 of the drawings I disclose a modified form of baffle which may be used in place of the bafile 42 previously described. Figure 6 of the drawings shows a baffie 50 which is similarly shaped to the baffle 42 but which is provided with an arcuate lip 51 at its outer extremity which fits against the end of the body 12 or fits within the inner surface of the body 12 adjoining the end thereof. This lip 51 completely encloses the portion of the tubular body 12 into which the harmonica unit 10 extends which tends to confine the sound waves to the chamber on one side of the baffie 50. This type of construction has some advantages in playing certain types of music as the tone chamber is almost entirely enclosed; On the other hand, the effect which may be obtained by placing the hand over the open end of the body 12 is greatly diminished in scope as air cannot readily pass through the open end of the horn-shaped body and the tone is initially muted.

In the foregoing description, only a volume control has been described. Figure 1 shows a combination volume control and tone control, the elements being shown in aligned relation. Actually these elements can be mounted side by side if preferred.

The volume control operating shaft 21 may be hollow,

and may accommodate an inner shaft 53. A'tone control 54 is secured to the volume control unit 16 and held from rotation with respect thereto.

operating knob 55 by means of which the tone control unit 54 is operated.

While the unit is shown with a single adjustable clamping plate 39 it is obvious that both of the lips between which the harmonica is supported may be adjustable- Figure 4 shows a second adjustable clamping plate 56' in place of the fixed lip 34. The structure is otherwise similar to that previously described.

Figures 7 and 8 of the drawings show a modified form of construction in which the microphone is resiliently supported at the outlet end of the horn shaped body. In the microphone attachment B, the horn shaped body 57 is provided with a closed end 59. A volume control 60 and a tone control 61 are secured on this closed end,

type shown in my Patent 2,577,288, issued December 4,-

As the microphone is mounted more closely adjacentto the high notes of the harmonica than to the low notes thereof, these higher notes are somewhat emphasized,

compensating for the usually louder tones from the bass it portion or lower reeds.

The operating shaft 53 extends through the shaft 21, and is provided withan In accordance with the patent statutes, I have described the principles of construction and operation of my electric harmonica, and while I have endeavored to set forth the best embodiment thereof, I desire to have it understood that obvious changes may be made within the scope of the following claims without departing from the spirit of my invention.

1 claim:

,1. In combination, an elongated tubular member having a closed end and an open end, a microphone supported within said tubular body adjoining said closed end, said tubular body having an elongated slot therein between said microphone and the open end of said body, a harmonica releasably supported within said elongated slot, said slot supporting said harmonica with one side thereof projecting into said tubular body, a baflle extending diagonally across said tubular body, said baflie being relatively close to said harmonica near the open end of said tubular body and relatively far from said harmonica near the opposite end of said bafiile.

2. An electric harmonica including in combination an elongated tubular body, a microphone supported upon a plane substantially normal to the axis of the elongated tubular body near one end thereof and facing toward the other end of said body said tubular member having an elongated slot extending generally parallel to the axis of the elongated tubular member between said microphone and the opposite end of said elongated tubular member, said slot being designed to accommodate a harmonica therein, a harmonica extending through said slot, means on said tubular body engaging said harmonica for holding said harmonica extending through said slot, and said opposite end of said elongated tubular member being open, a baffle extending longitudinally of said tubular member and extending angularly with respect to the axis thereof, said bafiie being supported by said tubular body, the end of said bafl le near the open end of the tubular member being closer to said harmonica than the opposite end thereof.

3. An electric harmonica including in combination an elongated tubular body, a microphone supported upon a plane substantially normal to the axis of the elongated tubular body near one end thereof and facing toward the other end of said body, said tubular member having an elongated slot extending generally parallel to the axis of the elongated tubular member between said microphone and the opposite end' of said elongated tubular member, said slot being designed to accommodate a harmonica therein, a harmonica extending through said slot, means on said tubular body for limiting the inward movement of said harmonica, means on said tubular body engaging said harmonica for holding said harmonica extending through said slot, and said opposite end of said elongated tubular member being open, a bafiie extending longitudinally of said tubular member, said bafiie being supported by said tubular member and extending angularly with respect to the axis thereof, said baffle member being closer to said harmonica nearest the open end of said tubular member than at the opposite end thereof, said bafile member extending into close proximity with said tubular member about its entire circumference.

4. An electric harmonica including in combination an elongated tubular body having an open end and a closed end, said body having an elongated slot extending generally parallel to the axis of the elongated tubular member intermediate the ends thereof, said slot being designed to accommodate a harmonica therein, a harmonica extending through said slot, a baflie extending diagonally across said tubular body, said baflle being relatively close to said harmonica near the open end of said body and relatively far from said harmonica near the opposite end of said baflie, and a microphone supported by said body adjacent one end thereof.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Re. 23,162 Zaccagnino Oct. 25, 1949 549,344 Bennett Nov. 5, 1895 666,686 Orlando Jan. 29, 1901 681,753 Striefiler Sept. 3, 1901 703,752 Alexander et al. July 1, 1902 723,701 Messner Mar. 24, 1903 2,309,406 McAulifie Ian. 26, 1943 2,664,775 Zielinski Jan. 5, 1954

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US549344 *Jul 27, 1895Nov 5, 1895THE LYON a HEALYRobert j
US666686 *Nov 27, 1900Jan 29, 1901Pietro OrlandoCasing for harmonicas.
US681753 *May 15, 1901Sep 3, 1901Edward StriefflerHarmonica.
US703752 *Jan 18, 1902Jul 1, 1902Arthur S AlexanderAttachment for mouth-harmonicas.
US723701 *Mar 22, 1902Mar 24, 1903Matthias MessnerShell for mouth-harmonicas.
US2309406 *Mar 28, 1942Jan 26, 1943Patrick McauliffeMusical instrument
US2664775 *Jul 25, 1951Jan 5, 1954Joseph S KishelHarmonica apparatus
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4091704 *Jan 26, 1977May 30, 1978Moe Leroy HowardSound chamber and transducer apparatus for use with harmonica
US4171659 *Nov 6, 1978Oct 23, 1979Tumminaro Peter MElectrified guitar accessory
US4212219 *Jul 6, 1979Jul 15, 1980Hubbard Dana LHarmonica stand
US4287803 *Jun 28, 1979Sep 8, 1981Fred ZemaElectric mouth organ holder
US4385541 *Feb 22, 1982May 31, 1983Walter MullerOperating apparatus used at an electronic instrument provided with at least one synthesizer
US4397213 *Jul 16, 1982Aug 9, 1983Hubbard Dana LHarmonica holder and shroud
US4497234 *Mar 21, 1983Feb 5, 1985Strnad Frank FSound attachment for a reed instrument
US4545277 *Apr 11, 1984Oct 8, 1985Strnad Frank FSound attachment for a reed instrument
US4837836 *Sep 30, 1982Jun 6, 1989Barcus Lester MMicrophone pickup system
US4984499 *Mar 6, 1989Jan 15, 1991Ron SchilleElectronic harmonica for controlling sound synthesizers
US8003878 *Aug 23, 2011Gaynier David AElectroacoustic transducer system
US8362346 *Jan 29, 2013Dan Edward ProzinskiHarmonica holder and sound baffle
US8450588Aug 2, 2012May 28, 2013Gary ApplegateHands-free harmonica mounting system and method of use
US8754313Apr 25, 2013Jun 17, 2014Gary ApplegateHands-free harmonica mounting system and method of use
US8895825 *Apr 19, 2013Nov 25, 2014James F. AntakiMethods and devices for muting a harmonica
US8993864 *Oct 15, 2013Mar 31, 2015Mark A. CramerSupport device for harmonica and microphone
US20100031806 *Feb 11, 2010Gaynier David AElectroacoustic Transducer System
US20130276615 *Apr 19, 2013Oct 24, 2013James F. AntakiMethods and Devices for Muting a Harmonica
Classifications
U.S. Classification84/743, 84/723, 84/378, 984/137, 84/DIG.140
International ClassificationG10D7/12
Cooperative ClassificationG10D7/123, Y10S84/14
European ClassificationG10D7/12B