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Publication numberUS2946211 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 26, 1960
Filing dateOct 8, 1957
Priority dateOct 8, 1957
Publication numberUS 2946211 A, US 2946211A, US-A-2946211, US2946211 A, US2946211A
InventorsMorancy William F
Original AssigneeLawson Products Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Knitted fabrics
US 2946211 A
Images(10)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

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C D C C D C PC' ATTORNEYS.

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BY n y D FABRICS William'F. Morancy, PawtnckegRJ., assigner to Lawson Products, Inc., Pawtucket, RJ., a corporation of Rhode Island Filed Oct. 8, 1957, Ser. No. 688,953

6 Claims. (Cl. 66-200) This invention relates` to -knitted fabrics. More particularly, it is concerned with knitted fabrics primarily intended for use in the manufacture of Ysupporting garments, such as foundationl garments, brassieres and the like.

The chief aim of my invention is to provide knitted fabrics suitable for the above purposes which are porous, attractive in appearance, light in weight and elastic` so that garments madeV therefrom will furnish the desired support while conforming comfortably to the contour of thewearers body.

Another object of my invention is to provide elastic knitted fabrics having the above attributes which lend themselves to economic production in quantity by manufacture in tube form on circular knitting machines.

A further object of my invention` isto provide net elastic fabrics which; are knitted of .inelastic and elastic yarns and which have staggered interstices formed therein.

It is a further object of my invention to provide knitted fabricscomposed of monoiilarnent inelastic'yarnand hav ing interstices formedrtherein bythe interlooping or tucking loops of spaced courses in spaced wales and' having spaced courses containing elastic yarn knitin spaced wales and oated across the wales intervening between said latter spaced Wales.

Other objects andattendant advantages will appear from the following detailedv description of the attached drawings, wherein: y

Fig. l is a fragmentar, diagrammatic view showing the front face of a knittedifabric, embodying my invention and produced on a circular lknitting machine having four feeds or multiples thereof.

Figs. 2 and 3 are photographic'views on a magnified scale of the front and back faces, respectively, of an actual, unstretched fabric of the type shown in Fig. l.

Figs. 4 and 5 are magnied views of the fabric of Figs. 2 land 3 showing the front andbaok faces, respectively, When in stretched condition.

Figs. 6, 7, 8, 9 and l() are views corresponding to Figs. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, respectively, showing a modified fabric embodying my invention and produced on a circular machine having six feeds or multiples thereof.

The fabric shown in Fig. l of the drawings as illustrative of my invention is arone and one rib structure having outer face cylinder needle wales C in alternation, respectively, with inner face dial needle wales D and D and having staggered interstices X and X formed, respectively, in overlapping alternate and intervening zones Z and Z. This fabric can be produced rapidly and economically on any standardY circular rib machine, such as a Scott and Williams or a Wildman Jacquard machine having complements of cylinder and dial needles, four feeds r multiples thereof, which are represented in Fig. l by the numbers l-lV, and means for variantly selecting dial needles for tucking or Welting. In knitting the fabric of Fig. l on a four feed machinen-accordance with my invention, six yarns are employed, these comprising four Patented `lnly 26,

inelastic yarns i, i', :"2 and i3 `and two elastic yarns e and i. and the elastic yarn e yare fed at feed I, the inelastic.

yarn is fed at` feed Il, the inelastic yarn i2 and the elastic yarn' e" are fed at feed III, and the inelastic yarn i3 is fed at4 feed IV. During formation of the fabric,

all of the cylinder needles of the machineknit allof the inelasticyarns. The elastic yarns e ande :are not knitted by `any of the cylinder needles, andhence are floated' across all the cylinder needle wales C.

At feed l alternate dial needles are moved out to clearing position to4 take and knit the inelastic yarn z" and the elastic yarne in the spaced wales D, while theintervening dial needles pass in welt position to` hold the stitches previously formed by them from inelastic yarn i3 and miss the yarns z' and e, thereby causing the latter yarns to iloatl across the intervening dial needle wales D. At feed Il yalternate dial needles are moved out to clearing position to take and knit the inelastic yarn i' in the spaced wales D, While the intervening dial needles are moved'outk to tuck position .to take and hold the `yarn* z" in the intervening wales D. Interlooped with the yarn i in the intervening wales Dl are the previously drawn loops of inelastic yarni3 which were held on the needles formingv Wales D during knitting at feeds I and ll. At feed lll alternate dial needles are moved outto clearing positiony to take and knit the. inelastic yarn i2 and the elastic yarn-e in the intervening walesD, While. the intervening dial needles pass in welt position to hold the stitches previously formed by them from yarn i and missthe` yarns i2 and e', thereby causing the latter yarns to iioatacrossthe spaced wales D. At feed IV alternate dial needles are moved out to clearing position to take and knit the. inelastic yarn i3 in the intervening wales D', while the intervening dial needles are moved out to tuck-position tortake andholdthe yarn i3 in the spaced wales D. Interloopedwith the yarn i3 in the spaced wales= D'are the previouslyl drawn loops of inelastic yarn i' which were held on the needles forming Wales D during knittingiat feeds III and IV.

:Selection of dial needles such that alternate dial needles knit while the remaining dial needles welt or tuck, andreversing the procedure at other feeds, may be accomplished invarious Well known ways. 'For example, two lengths of needles may be used in the dial, as in interlock machines, together with double cam raceways. Selection also may be accomplished by use of long and short butt needles using'cams in a manner Well known to those skilledinthe knitting art.

As a consequence of knitting the fabric in the manner just described, the interstices X in the alternate zones Z are staggered relative to the interstices X in the zones Z. It will lie-noted that the elongated and short tuck loops 9- and lll formed of the inelastic yarns z" and i3 in the courses 4- are anchored by doubled regular loops7 and 8 ofthe inelastic-and elasticyarns z' and e in the courses l, and that the elongated and short tuck loops 9 and 10': formed'of the inelastic yarns i3 and i in the courses?. are anchored by doubled regular loops 7 and 8' of theiinelastic'and elastic yarns z"-Z and e in the courses 3. It is to bel further noted that in all instances floats of the inelastic and elastic yarns extend acrossV the interstices X and X at the outer face of the fabric and that the elongate yarn loops 9 and 9 are formed at the. inner face of thefabric.

Preferably, the inelastic yarns used in the practice of this invention should comprise stiff monoiilament syn'- thetic yarns, such as nylon or the like.

The elastic yarns used in the lpractice of this invenber yarn and elastic polymers of the type disclosed in U.S.y

Patent No. 2,623,031, one example of which is presently known as DuPont Lycra, a spandex yarn.

In Figs. 2 to 5 inclusive is shown an actual fabric having the loop and yarn construction of the fabric diagrammatically shown in Fig. l. The outer face of the fabric is shown in Figs. 2 and 4 and its inner face is shown in Figs. 3 and 5. The fabric is unstrctched in Figs. 2 and 3 and stretched in Figs. 4 and 5. In this fabric, the two elastic yarns e and e each comprise 100 core nylon covered rubber yarn, and the inelastic yarns i, i', i2 and i3 each comprise two ends of 20 denier monolament nylon yarn, rather than a single end of a coarser denier nylon yarn, such as 40 denier. The term 100 core as applied to rubber yarn indicates a yarn of such diameter that one hundred bare strands thereof may be laid side by side Within the space of one inch. Multiple ends of smaller denier nylon yarn may be used in lieu of a single end of a coarser denier nylon yarn for various purposes, such as to reduce stiifncss in the fabric, to add to the lengthwise stretch of the fabric, to permit more uniform tensioning and thereby reduce wash boardiness when large multiples of yarn feeds are used and to provide a safety factor in the case of yarn breakage, due to the yarn catching on the bobbin or other cause, which normally affects only one end, thereby reducing chances of the fabric being cast of the needles. In addition to the use of two ends of 20 denier nylon yarn in lieu of a single end of .40 denier nylon yarn, it is possible also to use, in the fabric of Figs. 3, 4, 5 and 6, three ends of l2 or l5 denier monofilament nylon yarn or four ends of denier monolament nylon yarn. Of course, the number of ends of monoiilament yarn used in the practice of this invention, and the deniers thereof, may be varied through wide ranges, as is well understood in the art, for the purpose of producing certain desired results in the nished fabric. Similarly, monofilament synthetic yarns other than nylon, such as polyesters (eg. Dacron), acrylics (eg. Orlon), and the like, may be used if desired.

It will be seen from Figs. 4 and 5 that when the fabric is stretched the elastic yarns e and e" are formed into definite loops wherever they have been knitted into the Wales D and D. When the fabric isv relaxed, however, as shown in Figs. 2 and 3, the elastic yarns e and e' become unknitted, i.e., due to their inherent tendency to contract, tend to place themselves in a straight line. This result is made possible by reason of the fact that the rnonoiilament nylon yarns in the fabric present a slippery surface and hence offer a very low degree of frictional resistance to the contraction of the elastic yarns. The friction between the elastic and relatively stiff inelastic yarns is sufficient, however, to prevent the elastic yarns from resolving themselves into absolute straight lines, with the result that the elastic yarns take on a sinuous appearance, as is clearly shown in Figs. 2 and 3, the depressions of which comprise the stitches of the elastic yarn which have become unknitted, i.e. have tended to straighten out. Due to such interaction and interposition of the inelastic and elastic yarns in the fabric when it is relaxed, the fabric acquires a highly attractive and sheer appearance.

When the fabric is unstretched, as shown in Figs. Z and 3, the elastic yarn loops, due to the contraction of 'mere wraps about the elastic yarns, thereby adding to the sheerness of the fabric.

As shown in Figs. 2 and 3, the unstretched fabric of this invention presents a net appearance of spaced, substantially straight elastic strands having a slightly undulating character and held in the fabric by nearly invisible inelastic yarn stitches. Thus, the fabric is capable of having both strong elastic qualities and extreme sheerness.

The undulating elastic strands comprise a series of slight crests and depressions in alteration, the depressions, of course, being the loops of the elastic yarns which have pulled back through their anchoring yarn loops into virtual straight line formation. The crests and depressions I thereof.

of each alternate elastic strand are staggered with respect to the crests and depressions of the intervening elastic strands. Thus, the unstretched fabric is formed with a plurality of spaced, walewise extendingV depressions of elastic yarn with each pair of such spaced depressions separated by an intervening crest of elastic yarn. As will readily be seenV in Figs. 2, 3, 4 and 5, fwhen the fabric is unstretched each interstice X and X is formed by a tucked stitch of inelastic yarn and is framed at its opposite ends, respectively, by a crest and by a depression of elastic yarn disposed in opposing relation.

The modified fabric diagrammatically illustrated in Fig. 6 is made on a machine having six feeds or multiples -It is constructed in the manner of the four feed fabric of Fig. l, except additional courses 5 and 6 are knit between courses 1 and 2 and 3 and 4, respectively. Courses 5 are formed from inelastic yarn i4 fed at feed 1I and have their loops 12' in the intervening dial needle wales D' tucked with the loops 9' and 10' of the inelastic yarns 13 and i in the courses Z. Courses 6 the elastic yarns e and e', are pulled back through their are formed from inelastic yarn i5 fed at feed V and have their loops 12 in the alternate dial needle wales D tucked with the loops 9 and 10 of the inelastic yarns i' and i3 in the courses 4. As a consequence, the intersticcs X in the alternate zones Z are staggered relative to the interstices X in the zones Z. The elongate yarn loops 9 and 9 are formed at the inner face of the fabric, while the floats of the inelastic yarns extend across the loops 9 and 9' at the outer face of the fabric.

In Figs. 7 to l()V inclusive is shown an actual fabric having the loop and yarn construction of the fabric diagrammatically shown in Fig. 6. The outer face of the fabric is shown in Figs. 7 and 9 and its inner face is vshown in Figs. 8 and l0. The fabric is unstretched in Figs. 7 and 8 and stretched in Figs. 9 and 10. In this fabric, t-he inelastic yarns i, i', f3, i3, i4 and i5 each cornprise two ends of 2O denier rnonolarnent nylon yarn, while the elastic yarns e and e' each comprise 100 core nylon covered rubber yarn.

As will be seen from Figs. 7 and 8, when the fabric is relaxed, the elastic yarns e and e become unknitted and acquire a sinuous appearance. When the fabric is stretched, as shofwn in Figs. 9 and l0, the elastic yarns e and e' take on the appearance of definite loops wherever they have been knitted into the wales D and D'.

While the specific illustrations herein shown and described relate to one and one rib knitted fabrics, it is to be understood that such fabrics are merely preferred embodiments of my invention. As will be well understood by those skilled in the art, my invention lends itself to weft knitted fabrics of all types, including plain knitted fabrics and the various rib knitted fabric constructions.

Similarly, feeding of the elastic yarns may be reversed or varied without departing from the spirit of this invention. For example, in the fabric of Fig. 6, elastic yarn may be fed at feeds Il and V instead of at feeds I and IV.

Also, Where a circular dial and cylinder machine is used, selection of needles for tucking and welting may occur on the cylinder needles instead of on the dial needles, in which event the elongated loops Will be formed .alt the outer face of the fabric. Thus, while the term rib wales is generally understood in the art to denote the needle wales knit by the dial needles of a knitting machine, it is to be understood that such term rib wales as used in the claims herein may denote either the needle Wales knit by the dial needles or the needle wales knit by the cylinder needles of a knitting machine.

It is to be understood that While in both of the exemplified forms of the fabric shown in the drawings the zones Z and Z overlap each other, they may be separated by one or more courses, preferably knitted from inelastic yarn, in a manner which will also be readily understood by those skilled inthe knitting art.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

l. In a rib knitted elastic net fabric composed of courses of monoiilarnent inelastic yam and elastic yarn, a plurality of spaced interstices disposed throughout the fabric, said interstices comprising tucked stitches of said monoilament inelastic yarn, and a plurality of spaced undulating elastic strands formed of said elastic yarn, said elastic strands each having a succession of alternating crests and depressions, said depressions comprising unknitted stitches of elastic yarn when the fabric is unstretched, the depressions of alternate elastic strands being disposed in the same wales as the crests of the intervening elastic strands whereby each interstice in the fabric is framed at its opposite ends, respectively, by a crest and a depression disposed in opposing relation, the total denier of said rnonolament inelastic yarn per course being 45 denier or less.

2. In a rib knitted elastic net fabric composed of courses of monolament inelastic yarn and elastic yarn, a plurality of spaced interstices disposed throughout the fabric, said interstices comprising tucked stitches of Said monolament inelastic yarn, and a plurality of spaced undulating elastic strands formed of said elastic yarn, said elastic strands each having a succession of alternating crests and depressions, said depressions comprising unknitted stitches of elastic yarn when the fabric is unstretched, the depressions of alternate elastic strands being disposed in the same wales as the crests of the intervening elastic strands whereby each interstice in the fabric is framed at its opposite ends, respectively, by a crest and a depression disposed in opposing relation, said inelastic yarn comprising a plurality of monolament strands of or more denier each.

3. In a rib knitted elastic net fabric composed of courses of monolament inelastic yarn and elastic yarn, a plurality of spaced interstices disposed throughout the fabric, said interstices comprising tucked stitches of said monolilament inelastic yarn, and a plurality of spaced undulating elastic strands formed of said elastic yarn, said elastic strands each having a succession of alternating crests and depressions, said depressions comprising unknitted stitches of elastic yarn when the fabric is unstretched, the depressions of alternate elastic strands being disposed in the same wales as the crests of the intervening elastic strands whereby each interstice in the fabric is framed at its opposite ends, respectively, by a crest and a depression disposed in opposing relation, said inelastic yarn comprising two monoflament strands of 20 denier each.

4. In a rib knitted elastic net fabric composed of'v courses of monoilarnent inelastic yarn and elastic yarn, a plurality of staggered interstices, said interstices comprising tucked stitches of said monofilament inelastic yarn in selected rib wales of the fabric, and a plurality of spaced undulating elastic strands formed of said elastic yarn, said elastic strands each having a succession of alternating crests and depressions, said depressions comprising unknitted stitches of elastic yarn when the fabric is unstretched, the depressions of alternate elastic strands being disposed in the same rib wales as the crests of the intervening elastic strands whereby each interstice in the fabric is framed at its opposite ends, respectively, by a crest and a depression disposed in opposing relation, the total denier of said monolament inelastic yarn per course being 45 denier or less.

5. In a rib knitted elastic net fabric composed of courses of monofilament inelastic yarn and elastic yarn, a plurality of staggered interstices, said interstices comprising tucked stitches of said monolilament inelastic yarn in selected rib wales of the fabric, and a plurality of spaced undulating elastic strands formed of said elastic yarn, said elastic strands each having a succession of alternating crests and depressions, said depressions com prising unknitted stitches of elastic yarn when the fabric is unstretched, the depressions of alternate elastic strands being disposed in the same rib wales as the crests of the intervening elastic strands whereby each interstice in the fabric is framed at its opposite ends, respectively, by a crest and a depression disposed in opposing relation, said inelastic yarn comprising a plurality of monotlament strands of l0 or more denier each.

`6. In a rib knitted elastic net fabric composed of courses of monolament inelastic yarn and elastic yarn, a plurality of staggered interstices, said interstices comprising .tucked stitches of said monofllament inelastic yarn in selected rib wales of the fabric, and a plurality of spaced undulating elastic strands formed of said elastic yarn, said elastic strands each having a succession of alternating crests -and depressions, said depression comprising unknitted stitches of elastic yarn when the fabric is unstretched, the depressions of alternate elastic strands being disposed in the same rib wales as the crests of the intervening elastic strands whereby each interstice in the fabric is framed at its opposite ends, respectively, by a crest and a depression disposed in opposing relation, said inelastic yarn comprising two monolilament strands of 20 denier each.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,090,910 Diumheller Aug. 24, 1937 2,103,625 Longtin Dec. 28, 1937 2,127,780 Marshall Aug. 23, 1938 2,204,731 Getaz lune 18, 1940 2,225,277 Pons Dec. 17, 1940 2,250,359 `Clark July 22, 1941 2,306,246 Davis Dec. 22, 1942 2,336,222 Clark Dec. 7, 1943 2,350,359 Krasnov et al. June 6, 1944

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2090910 *Feb 17, 1936Aug 24, 1937Carter William CoRib knitted fabric having controllable longitudinal stretch
US2103625 *Jul 19, 1934Dec 28, 1937Infant Socks CompanyHosiery
US2127780 *Jul 25, 1936Aug 23, 1938United Hosiery Mills CorpElastic top hosiery
US2204731 *Apr 15, 1937Jun 18, 1940Getas James LouisPlain knitted ornamented fabric having elastic thread incorporated therein and process of making same
US2225277 *Aug 15, 1939Dec 17, 1940Pilot Full Fashion Mills IncHosiery with elastic section
US2250359 *Mar 11, 1939Jul 22, 1941Clark David MElastic fabric
US2306246 *Jun 26, 1935Dec 22, 1942W B Davis & Son IncKnitted wear
US2336222 *Jun 12, 1940Dec 7, 1943David Clark Company IncUndergarment in the form of a girdle and method of making the same
US2350359 *Nov 8, 1941Jun 6, 1944Sure Fit Products CompanySelf-conforming, surface - gripping, ready-made knitted slip cover for overstuffed upholstered furniture
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3035427 *Feb 9, 1957May 22, 1962Lawson Products IncKnitted fabrics and in methods of producing such fabrics
US3093988 *Oct 13, 1961Jun 18, 1963Munsingwear IncMethod for knitting panty panels for body molding garments
US3306288 *Nov 9, 1964Feb 28, 1967Scholl Mfg Co IncTubular bandage and material therefor
US3933013 *Feb 18, 1975Jan 20, 1976Alamance Industries, Inc.Control panty hose
US3956906 *Aug 21, 1975May 18, 1976Alamance Industries, Inc.Control top panty hose and method of knitting same
US4998419 *Jan 26, 1989Mar 12, 1991Moore Rosemary V AProcess for knitting loop pile
US6263707 *Sep 20, 1999Jul 24, 2001Milliken & CompanyOpaque heat-moldable circular knit support fabrics having very high spandex content
US7846145Nov 8, 2005Dec 7, 2010Rusl, LlcBody conforming textile holder and absorbent article
US8099794Dec 19, 2005Jan 24, 2012Rusl, LlcBody conforming textile holder for electronic device
US8454570Dec 23, 2010Jun 4, 2013Rusl, LlcSystem comprising thong-shaped holder and absorbent article
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/200, 66/202, 450/93
International ClassificationD04B1/18, D04B1/14
Cooperative ClassificationD04B1/18
European ClassificationD04B1/18