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Publication numberUS2947033 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 2, 1960
Filing dateApr 12, 1957
Priority dateApr 12, 1957
Publication numberUS 2947033 A, US 2947033A, US-A-2947033, US2947033 A, US2947033A
InventorsDavid E Ryan
Original AssigneeDavid E Ryan
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe repair molds
US 2947033 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 2, 1960 D. E. RYAN SHOE REPAIR MoLDs 3 Sheets-Sheet l Filed April 12, 1957 'l1/1111111111111. rllll'll lull.

INVENTOR. DAVID E. RYAN A1152, 1960 D. E. RYAN 2,947,033

sHoE REPAIR Moms Filed April 12, 1957 s sheets-sheet 2 Fldfls.

INVENTOR. DAVID E. vRYAN ATTORNEY Aug. 2, 1960 D. E@ RYAN 2,947,033

SHOE REPAIR MoLDs Filed April l2, 1957 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. DAVID E. RYAN ATTORNEY This invention relates to shoe repair molds.

In shoes, the heels and soles of the shoe become worn olf or run over at their edges requiring normally a new heel or a new soleat a great expense when Vactually the fmount of wear is only a fraction of the surface of the heel or sole and which could be replaced in a simple manner. Heretofore rubber-like materials not requiring heat vulcanization but in the nature ofmolding material which could be left to cold vulcanization for the purpose vof being hardened and providing the heel'and sole with material of such consistency and wear qualities as which had been removed and of the consistency of the heel and sole material themselves, have not been available.

Within recent years there has been developed a cold setting rubber material which can `beapplied to the rubber or rubber-like material for the purpose of covering a wear spot or opening thereon by simply shaping the material by working it with the hands 4and fingers and with the amount of material needed for the vparticular hole or opening and thereafter -xing the material to and within the opening by suitable adhesive thereafter allowing the material to cold set -and become hard for iinal use It is theprinoipal object of the present invention there-V fore to provide molds which canbe quickly and easily applied to theV heel or solefof a `shoe, and` lillaiVY/hich this 2,947,033 g Patented Aug. 2,*1960 "ice It is a still further. object of the invention to provide in a mold for fixing moldable material toa heel or toe of the shoe and which the moldable material will be elevated from the surface of the heel or sole when the mold has been removed.

It -is a still further object ofthe invention to provide a repair mold for' heel and soles ofshoes in whichparts can be secured upon the shoe and to one another in as simple a means as with Yelastic bands.

It is a still further object of the invention to provide a suitable reinforcingmember or combination reinforcing and wear plate member adapted to be embedded Wholly or partially inthe moldable material and secured to and made a part thereof.`

Otherv objects of the invention are to provide a shoe' repair mold for use in making repairs upon the heels and sole of a shoe, which is of simple construction, inexpen-Y sive to manufacture, has Va minimum number of parts, easily and quicklyapplied to the shoe, compact and requires little storage space, effective and eicient in use.

lFor a better understanding of the invention, reference may be had to the following detailed description take'n in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which-` Figure 1 is a perspective view of a shoe repair mold clamped `to theheel of ashoe, Y i

Fig. 2 is a transverse sectional view taken through the mold and through the heel of the shoe, on line Til-2 of Fig.l,

mold material can be packed orfrforced or shaped to ill Y openings or run olf spots at'the sides of the rubber heel or on the toe of the sole. A'

VIt i-s another object of theinvention to provide a mold adapted to be lapplied to the Yrubber heel of a shoe which will extend completely around the' side, front and back of the heel and adapted to be clamped thereto so that molding material can be packed about the front edge of the heelv at the corners or side thereofas well as atthe rear of the heel. r

It is -a further object of the invention to provide a shoe thesole of V-a shoe,

repair mold adapted to be placed about the heel which has a top surface swing down vmember and combined clamp means for securing the sides of the mold tothe sides of the heel and for holding the top mold plate over the mold material and the top of the heel.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a shoe repair mold for cold setting moldable repair materials in which the parts of the mold are adjustable to diiferent size heels or soles.

It is a still further object of the' invention to provide a mold for holding cold setting moldable material which is adapted to not only effect a molding'of the material with its top plate but to provide anangularly adjustable centering or` retaining member within the `mold that will hold a wear` plate in proper-position upon:` the molding Fig. 3 is a perspective View of the mold being separated from the repaired heel, Y

Fig. 4 is a perspective View of a slightly modified form of, a mold, where laterally-adjustable backing members are used for the front edge of the heel, i, Fig. 5 isa horizontal sectional view taken generally on line Spi-'Sjef Fig. 4.anfd through top plate and its clampifngmembers, vFig.` 6 isa perspective view of aV repairl mold similar to that yshown in the above figures but with an angularly adjustable hold down plate inserted whichhas openings therein for containingdiiferent shaped wear platesto hold them `against later-al displacement while the mold material is b eing hardened Aabout the underside ofthe wear plate,

Fig. 7 isa side elevational viewiof a metalwear yplate having embedding projections therein,

,`Fig. 8 isa top plan view ofthe metal wear plate shown in Figsland 7, ,Y v f V i" Fig. 9 y Y a perspective View of a repair mold secured to` lFig. 10-is a transverse` sectionali view taken on line ltljl() of Fig. v9 throughthemoldand throughthe shoev sole, j

Fig. l-,l isa perspectiveeview of a mold only Apartially extending over the toe portion of the' sole and having an elevated relief for permitting an elevated excess'ofthe mold material on the`wear area, u 4

Fig; =l2 is a sectional View ofthe partial toe 'mold shown in Fig. 1 1 andas viewed on line 12j-12 therematerial so that the neeiwiirbe provided with a 1ifiwii'h l.

. rial mass. f

jFig. 13 is a perspective view Yof the toe sole repair molde/ f i i- Fig. `l14`is a plan viw of the toesole moldassembly shownin Fig. 13, v Y Y n Fig. l5 is arear'. elevational View of 'the Vtoe mold assembly shown .in Figs.V 13 and 14,4

Figgl is a perspectiveview of astill Afurtherform `of arnold, shown .in place upon Ythe heel of a shoe and the parts 'thereof heldinassembled relationshipand upon the shoe with rubberbands, 'f

\fFigs;l 7,. I18, 19, 2() ,andA 21' are respectively bottom i' planviews jof Vmbber'vvear plateshaving formations n the bottom sides thereof respectively of different shapes for securing the Wear plate in the embedded material,

Fig. 22 is a perspective View of a heel and of the `wear plate shown' Fig.A 21 positioned abovethe h'eel and over ther molding.' materiali Vto which" the wear plate is to be'secured,

Fig. 23 is a top plan viewof awear plate havingV a roughened or serrated bottom formation,

Fig'. 24 is a` sectional View ofthe wear in Fig.2'3` taken' on line 24-'24 thereof,

Fig. 25 is a-top plan view of a wear plate having a plurality of projections depending therefrom, Fig. 26 is a front elevational view ofthe plate shown 1n flFig.` V25 asi viewed generally online 26-26 thereof, an

.Fig 27 isA al fragmentary perspective View of a heel with a grille reinforcing member embedded inthe molding material.

. Referring now particularly to iFigs. l to 3, there is shown the' heel mold indicated generally at 30 having a band 31.adapted' to be extended about a rubber heel 32 that has a worn down rear edge indicated generally plate shown at 33 into which moldmaterial 34 is to be placed. This mold material can be packed within the mold so as to lconform to the rounded shape of the band part 31 and 1n such a manner as to iill up the space 33 with the molded material up to the top surface of the heel 32. I'his band part according to.- this form of the invention is. held in place by angle-shaped side members 35 and 36 which carry respectively clamping bolts 37 and 38 and which are respectively extendable through slots 39 and 40 in' the ends of the band` 31. By forcing the angleshaped members 35 and 36 tightly against the rear edge o f thelheel and with respective] wing nuts 41 and 42 tightening the members in their clamped position the band will be held against rearward and outward displacement from the heel. Atthe rear of the band is a hinge projection 43 to which there is hingedly connected a cover 44 by its projections 45 anda hinge pin 46. 'l'his cover can be brought overl the top ofthe material 34 to shape its upper surface while itV is being hardened. -In order to hold thelplate 44 over the heel ay clamp assembly indicated generally at' 47 is applied to the sides of the shoe. This assembly 4T has two4 side clamp members 48- and 49; The clamp member 48- has lower and upper lips 50 andV 51 adapted to respectively overlie the edges of a shoe sole 52'011 which the rubber heel 32' 1s alreadyxed. The upper'lipfSl will overlie the plate 44. The side clamp member 49 similarly has lower and upper lugs 52' and 53 adapted to respectively underlie the opposite edge of the sole 5,2,ai'1dr`overlie the plate 44.V The side members 48 Vand 49 respectively have upper extensions 54 and 55 respectively between which extends Va threaded supportmember 56 for a hold down clamp screw y57 havinga plate 58 engaging with thetop of the mold plate 44 to hold down the-plate 44 when -screw 57 is tightened with the lingers and a turn handle 59. The support member 56 has threaded extensions 60 and 61 that respectively extend through the respective extensions 54 and 55 of the respective clamp members 48 and 49. I'he clamp members 48 and 49 are held in place bytightening respective wing nutsY 62 and 63. When the mold is left inplace for aV deinite period, such as overnight, the mold materi-al 34 will have been substantially adheredto the Worn heel area 33 and will have become sufficiently liard'to provide a built up heel and give wear to the heel the same as the original rubber had given wear.` A primer liquid is irst applied to the wear surface 33 to condition it, lthereafter the mold materialV is applied and allowed to harden to provide thereby a substantially built up mass integrally consolidated with the original heel.

In Figs. 4, 5` and 6, there is shown a modiedform of the arrangement as'indicated generally at 64,` which comprises a band 65 adapted to have its ends drawn about the heel and to which a top mold plate 66 is hingeably connected at 67. Extending between and through holes in the ends of the band member 65 is a threaded tie rod 68, on the ends of which are wing tightening nuts 69 and 70. The tie rod 68 is threaded throughout its length and mold-members 71 and 72 are respectively adjustable thereupon for adapting the band 66 to different size heels. These mold members 7=1 and 72 thus form a mold plate for the forward edge of the heel for the addition to a heel 73 of a molded mass 74. The mold member 72 can be iisedY for holding molding material on the opposite Vside of the heel, when that corner of the heel may have been worn.

It will be understood that these members 71 and 72 can be adjusted along the tie rod 68 in order to alter the band for diterent size widths of heels. The molding material 74is similarly applied and the top ofthe molding material is shaped with the top plate' 66. The top plate '66 is held down' by' the same clamping assembly 47 that was used with the form of the invention shown in Figs. l, 2 and 3`. Y

if it is desired to' anni heel plates 7s with the molding material projections 76 of these plates are forced into the molding material 74 `and it is held in place by a round retaining plate 77 having an opening 78 or indentation 79 therein conforming in shape to the plate 75. The cover 66 is hingedV downwardly over the plate 77 and will be held in place thereover by the hold down clamp assembly 47. The plate 77 can be turned to center the opening 78 or indentation 79 overv the worn area. This plate is of circular shape and can be angled into a position Where an upwardly depressed indentation 79 can receive and retain another heel plate of a different shape. In this case the circular plate, when the indentation 79 has been oriented for its particular function of retaining another shaped heel plate at the rear of the heel, the clamp assembly 47 can be used directly thereover without the need of the cover plate 66. When making this formation or with any such formation provided onthe rear of the heel, the heel mold members 71 and 72 are not needed. The plate 77 may'alsohave indentations on its underface conforming in shape to a design or trademark toA give the iin" vhed molded material a pleasing ap'- pearance. p

Referring now particularly to Figs. 9 and y10, there 1s shownv the adaptationof' the mold to a t'oe sole of the shoe. The shoe has the usual leather or rubber-like sole 80 aboutwhiclr a flexible band'81 is extended. Over this band is placed` a 'sole plate 82. This sole 80 can have a central worn area 83' into which is placed cold vulcaniz'- ing molding materialy 84 adapted to be affixed to the worn area 83 by an adhesive and which will harden underv the mold plate 82`over a short' period of time. This plate 32 andv the band 81 is held upon the sole of the shoe by hold down clamp assemblies 85 of similar construction to the hold down clamp assembly 47 above described. Turn cams 87' and I88 are" respectively provided on respective end members 87 and 88 to tighten Iand clamp the' end members together 'and uponv the sole of the shoe.` The endl members 87 and 881 respectively have lugs 39 and 90 engageable with the under edges of the shoe sole 80 and' respective upper extensions 91 and 92 throughI which extends threaded extensions 93 and 94 of a plate 95. Nuts 96A and 97 are respectively threaded upon the extensions 93 and 94 and when tightened will draw the respective clampl members 87 and 88`- against the sides of the shoe sole. The plate'195 carries'intermediate its length thereof a li'oldy down screw 98 that can beV turned bya'fturn handle 99 `andwhiclihas a plate/,100 that engages with the top of the hold down plate 82. With the assembly properly prepared in-this manner the molding material 84 is allowed Vtofharden and! is integrally united withr theA shoe sole'.v

In Figs. 111 and 12, a similar arrangement is shown-for the securement of molding material across thetoe of a shoe sole1101. About the toe is placed a `band 102 and over which a special mold plate .103 is placed. 'Ihe plate 103 has a raised formation 104 to provide for -a raised mass 105 upon the toe'of the sole `100 when the material has nally been hardened Vand in that way provide for additional wear material. If'desired, a wear plate similar to the plate shown in tFigs. 7 and 8 maybe disposed within the portion `104 to be held in place while the mass is being hardened. .Over this plate 103 there is placed a hold down clamp assembly85 constructed in the manner above described, and applied to hold the part together while the material is hardened. i .f Y v vAs shown in Figs. 13, 14 and 11,5, an assembly is provided which can be secured to -thetoe of a sole by pins 1 07 extended into the side of -the sole 108 and adapted to hold down top plate 109 as Well as -a band 110. The

band `110 has inwardly-extending lugs 111 adapted to oversides of the sole 108. The band 1=10 may also be retained about the edge of the sole by tacky tape strips 110' run'- ning from the ends of the band and along the edge of the sole. The band 110 has upper and lower holes 112 and 113. The lugs are spaced diierently from theV upper and lower edges of the band so that for a thick sole the band is placed upon the sole on one side and fora thin sole the band is inverted and thelugs placed upon the plate on their other side. With the band secured as shown inthe gures, the plate is positioned for use over a thick sole, whereas if the band is inverted its lugs will overlie the` plate for connection with a thin sole, The molding materia-l will have been placed under the plate 109 and when hardened the plate y109 and band 110 are removed.

' In Fig. .16, there is shown a still further form of the invention wherein the parts are retained upon the heel in assembled relationship by elastic bands. .According to this form of the invention a metal strip 4115 is extended about the edge of the heel of a shoe 1'16. 'Ihis strip 115 has on its opposite rear ends, projections 117 over which an elastic band ,1118 can be placed to hold the Yends of l the metal strip 115 against the sides of the lreel and by engagement with the front edge of the heel will prevent the rearward displacement ofthe strip from the heel. The mold material is applied on the rear edge of the heel in the usual manner and against the inner face of the strip 115. Thereafter, a top mold plate 119 is iitted over the heel and made to bear against the top of the mold material to form and shape the same. In order to hold the plate 119 against lateral displacement over the edge` of the strip y115 this plate is notched on its opposite sides .as indicated at 120 and 12/1an'd at its rear edge at 122. These notches receive respective projections .123, 124 and 125 that are bent to extend laterally outwardly but are of sufticient size to engage the side edges of the notches and thereby prevent the lateral displacement of the plate 119. Lying on the lower edge of the strip 115 are respective projections 126 and 127 vertically aligned with the respective projections 123 and `125. A similar projection not shown is vertically -aligned with the projection `124. YThese projections may thus serve to retain elastic bands 128 and 129 that can extend around the full heel :and including the forward edge thereof to hold the metal strip 115 upon the heel.

In order to hold the plate 119 tightly assembled upon the surface of the heel, and against the upper edge of the plate .119, there are provided'upstanding projections 130, 1-31, 132, and 133, -to the projections 130 and .133 of which the ends of an elastic band I134 is extended and Y the band running over the top of the shoe 116. The ends has iin-ally set the elastic bands can be removed and mold parts disassembled from the heel.

It Yhas been found that moldable material can accommodate a Wear plate and such plate can be rigidly made secure to the heel by this mold material as it hardens in recesses or projections on the underside of the wear plate. As shown in Fig. 17, a heel plate 136 formed of hard rubber, leather or similar durable material is provided with holes 137 into which the molding material may extend or penetrate when inV its pliable state to lock with the sides of the holes when the material hardens.

In Fig. 18, is a heel plate 138 having inner and outer arcuate ribs 139 and 140 on the underside thereof and angularly spaced transverse ribs 141, 142 and 143. The material will be projected into spaces between the ribs and will integrally adhere to the faces of the ribs as it becomes set.

InFig. 19 a plate 144 has a continuouszig-zag formation 145 having spaces 146 and 147 of open triangular shape into the apex of which the molding material will be extended and adhered. y

In Fig. 20 a heel plate 148 is provided which has crisscross formations formed of ribs 149 running from front to rear and interconnecting transverse ribs 150, 151 and 152 of substantially the same height running transversely so as to provide square openings 153 into which the moldable material can be pressed for adhesion with the sides of the ribs. i Y

In Fig. 21 a heel plate 154 is provided with a serpentineshaped projection or formation 155 on its underside providirig oppositely-extending spaces 156 and 157 into which the molding material is extended. This plate 154 can be applied as illustrated in Fig. 22 to moldable material 158 placed over the worn area 159 of a heel 160. As the molding material 158 hardens it will adhere to the serpentine projection 156 of the plate and be rigidly and integrally secured -to the mass material 158. While this is being done the Wear plates can be retained in position upon the heel 160 by the round plate 77, Fig. 6 which has indentation 79 of such shape as to accommodate the wear plate 154. lIn providing the wear formations of the undersides of the several wear plates shown in Figs. 18 to 22, theheight of the portion of the projectionsalong the outer peripheral edge can be greater than the height of the portion yalong the inner peripheral edge and so tha-t the shape of the projection from front to rear can conform generallyto the angle of wear of the heel.

Otherwear plates are shown in Figs. 23 4to 26 which can be similarly applied to the molding material 158 of the heel by the use of the plate 77. A plate 161 formed of rubber orthe like has on its underside a plurality of serrations 162 angularly spaced from one another. A similar eifect can be had by roughening the underface of the` plate. A wear plate 163 of somewhat similar shape to the other plates but smaller may be used. This plate 163 has several arcuate rows of depending pointed projections 164 adapted toi penetrate the molding material to which the material will be adhered.

In Fig. 27, there is shown a reinforcing grille member 165 adapted to be fully embedded in molding material 166 of a heel sole 163 land through openings 166 of which the molding material may extend and over the top of which may be sutcient thickness of material to cover the member 165. While various changes may be made inthe detail construction, it shall be understood that such changes shall be within 'the spirit and scope of the present invention as deiined by the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

the

1. In a shoe repair mold, a bendable band strip adapted to be wrapped about the edge of a shoe sole and to contine the shape of moldable material to the contour of the shoe sole, means for securing the ends of the band strip to the shoe sole, a top mold plate extended over the shoe Sole to shape the top' of the moldable material and means 7 for securing said top mold plate between the sides of Ythe strip and over `the shoe sole, said top mold plate hingedly 'connected to the band mold strip intermediate its length thereof and adapted to `overlie the upper edges of the band strip.

2. In a shoe repair mold, a bendableband strip adapted to be wrapped about the edge of a shoe sole and to confine the shape of moldable material -to the contour of theshoe sole, means for securing the ends of the band strip to the shoe sole, a top mold plate extended over the shoe sole to shape the top of the moldable material and means for securing the top mold plate between the sides of the'bendable band strip and over the shoe sole, and said means for securing the bandstrip to the shoe sole comprising adjustable mold members extending inwardly from the ends of the band strip along the front edge of a heel sole and a thumb clamp screw fastening member securing said adjustable mold members 4in their adjusted positions whereby mold material may be, applied to the sole along the adjustable mold members and between the ends of the band strip.

3. In a shoe repair mold, a bendable band strip adapted to be wrapped about the edge of a shoe sole and to conne the shape of moldable material to the contour of the shoe sole, means for securing the ends of the band strip to the shoe sole, a top mold plate extended over the shoe sole to shape the top of the moldable material and means for securing the top mold plate between the sides of the bendable band strip and over the shoe sole, and said means for clamping the top plate to the edges of the band strip and over the sole including opposing side clamp members having lower and upper lips adapted to overlie the lower and upper edges of the band strip and the plate, a transversely-extending bar support extending between the side clamp members, tightening nuts on the bar support dor drawing the side clamp members toward one another and against the shoe sole, an adjustable pressure screw extending through the bar support and having a pressure plate engageable with the top cover plate to press and hold the plate against upward displacement while the mold material is being hardened.

4. In a shoe repair mold, a bendable band strip adapted to be wrapped about the edge of a shoe soleand to confine the shape of moldable material to the contour of the shoe sole, means for securing the ends of the band strip to the shoe sole, a top mold plate extended over the shoe sole to shape the top of the moldable material and means for securing the top mold plate between the sides of the bendable band strip and over the shoe sole, and said means for securing the ends of the bendable band strip together comprising a threaded screw with an adjustable nut means thereon extending between the ends of the band strip and forwardly of the sole, mold plates adjustable upon said threaded screw to permit the band strip to be adjusted to different Width soles and the mold plate adjusted to lie at the corners of the sole.

5. In a shoe repair mold, a bendable band strip adapted to be wrapped aboutthe edge of a shoe sole and to contine the shape of moldable material to the contour of the shoe sole, means for securing the ends of the band strip to the shoe sole, a top mold plate extended over the shoe sole to shape the top of the moldable material and means for securing the top mold plate between the sides of the ,bendable band strip and over the shoe sole, and said top plate having an upward indentation whereby the molded material when finally hardened will be shaped to provide mold material elevated from the surface of the sole.

6. In aV shoe repair mold, a bendable band strip adapted to be wrapped about the edge of a shoe sole and to conline the shape of moldable material to the contour of the shoe sole, means for securing the' ends o f the band strip to theshoe sole, a top mold plate extended over the shoe sole to shape the top of the moldable material andv means for securing the top moldl plate between the sides of the b endable band strip and over the shoe sole, said means for securing the band strip about the sole comprising elastic rubber bands surrounding the outer face of the band strip and across the lfront edge of the sole, and said band strip having laterally-outward1y extending projections on its upper and lower edges to confine and retain the elastic band upon ythe lexterior surface of the band strip land against upward and downward displacement therefrom.

7. In a shoe repair mold, a bendable band strip adapted l to be wrapped about the edge of a shoe sole and to conline the shape of moldable material to the contour of the shoe sole, means for securing the ends of the bandxstrip to the shoe sole, a top mold plate extended over the shoe sole to shape the top of the moldable material and means for securing the top mold plate between the sides of the bendable band strip and over the shoe sole, and said means for securing said band strip about the shoe sole comprising elastic means, projections on the ends of the band strip to which lthe elastic means can be readily attached.

`8. In a shoe repair mold, a bendable band strip adapted to be wrapped about the edge of a shoe sole and to conne the shape of moldable material to the contour of the shoe sole, means for securing the ends of the band strip to the shoe sole, a top mold plate extended over the shoe sole to shape the topl of the moldable material and means for securing the top mold plate between the sides of the bendable band strip and over the shoe sole, and said means for securing the top plate over the band strip and over the shoe sole comprising hook projections extending upwardly from opposite sides of the top plate and elastic bands having their ends extended between the hook projections on the opposite sides of the top plate and over the top of the shoe.

9. In a shoe repair mold, a bendable band strip adapted to be wrapped about the edge of a shoe sole and to confine the shape of moldable material to the contour of the shoe sole, means for securing the ends of the band strip to the shoe sole, a top mold'plate extended over the shoe sole'to shape the top of the moldable material and means for securing the top mold plate between the sides of the bendable band strip and over the shoe sole, and said top plate having recesses adapted to be aligned with the projections on the top edge of the band strip whereby the top plate can be held against lateral displacement therefrom.

References'Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 642,611 Kaiser Feb. 6, 1900 1,266,936 Harris May 21, 1918 1,687,195 Carroll Oct. 9, 1928 2,168,213 Rollmann Aug. 1, 1939 2,203,543 Pancorbo June 4, 1940 2,398,092 Guttmann Apr. 9, 1946 2,406,005 Doherty Aug. 20, 1946 2,408,663 Lewis Oct. 1, 1946 2,571,547 Doherty Oct. 16, 1951 2,786,237 Keen et al Mar. 26, 1957

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US642611 *Jun 23, 1899Feb 6, 1900Friedrich KaiserAppliance for molding truss-heads.
US1266936 *Oct 31, 1917May 21, 1918Samuel J HarrisRubber article.
US1687195 *Nov 29, 1927Oct 9, 1928Carroll Sr Houston MFlask clamp
US2168243 *Mar 23, 1934Aug 1, 1939Ludwig H GrunebaumMethod for the production of shoes
US2203543 *Nov 10, 1938Jun 4, 1940Pancorbo ManuelRubber heel mold
US2398092 *Dec 23, 1944Apr 9, 1946Otto GuttmannHeel protector
US2406005 *Jan 23, 1945Aug 20, 1946William H DohertySole and heel former
US2408663 *Sep 6, 1945Oct 1, 1946Howell Lewis WilliamStud or protector for boots and shoes
US2571547 *Feb 1, 1949Oct 16, 1951William H DohertyShoe sole former
US2786237 *Jun 12, 1953Mar 26, 1957Us Rubber CoMethod of casting rubber soles on shoes
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4063986 *Jul 15, 1976Dec 20, 1977Caterpillar Tractor Co.Portable tire patch holding clamp and method
US4090294 *Mar 22, 1976May 23, 1978Bicc LimitedJointing or terminating plastics sheathed electric cable
US4157778 *Oct 4, 1977Jun 12, 1979Swingline, Inc.Binding system
US4478774 *Sep 30, 1982Oct 23, 1984Yee Tin BMethod for repairing heels of shoes
US4497755 *Aug 31, 1982Feb 5, 1985Korsyn Dever JAutomobile tail-light lens
Classifications
U.S. Classification425/14, 425/410, 264/259, 264/36.1, 264/36.22, 36/1
International ClassificationB29D35/12
Cooperative ClassificationA43D5/00, B29D35/124, B29K2021/00, B29D35/128
European ClassificationA43D5/00, B29D35/12M, B29D35/12C