Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2947071 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 2, 1960
Filing dateNov 2, 1956
Priority dateNov 2, 1956
Publication numberUS 2947071 A, US 2947071A, US-A-2947071, US2947071 A, US2947071A
InventorsPaul A Marchant
Original AssigneeInjection Molding Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for mating engaging fittings
US 2947071 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

2,947,071 METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MATING ENGAGING FITTINGS Filed Nov. 2, 1956 Aug. 2, 1960 P. A. MARCHA'NT 2 Sheets-Sfieet 1 illlllllgilvlllm II y mum INVENTOR. PW/ ,4. Marc/Mm 4 ,4 ore/15 2,947,071 METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MATING ENGAGING FITTINGS Filed Nov. 2, 195a Agg. 2,1960 P. A. MARCHANT I 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IIII IIIIII I 1 s [I l/ INVEN TOR.

Pau/ 14. Ma/z'fimfl United States Patent F METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MATING ENGAGING FITTINGS Paul A. Marchant, Kansas City, Mo., assignor to Injection Molding Company, Kansas City, Mo., a corporation of Missouri Filed Nov.'2, 1956, Ser. No. 620,000

' 2 Claims. 01. 29-235 ment and mating of frictionally engaging male and femalefittings within a circumferential flange.

Another objectof this invention is to provide such methods and apparatus which are extremely simple'in operation and construction and which precisely position the fitting parts relative one another for assembly thereof without damage of any of the components despite the Patented Aug. 2, 1960 2 the various views, like numerals are employed toJindicate like parts; I

Fig. 1 is a cross-sectional view through the female fitting, the flange member and the male fitting shown separated one from the other;

Figs. 2, 3 and 4 illustrate different stages in the meth od of assembling the fittings and circumferential flange and illustrate as well the apparatus for assembling the fittings;

Fig. 2 is a cross-sectional view of a die adapted to elfect, the assembling of certain types of fittings, the female fitting being positioned in the die with the flange member shown moving toward the die to be positioned therein relative the female fitting;

Fig. 3 is a cross-sectional view through the die of Fig. l and a punch positioned relative said die, the female fitting and flange member shown engagedwithin the die and the male fitting shown positioned within the punch being moved toward the die, the flange member and the male fitting;

Fig. 4 is a cross-sectional view through the die and punch of Fig. 2 showing the female fitting, the flange member and male fitting engaged within the die with the punch member moving away therefrom after effecting the joinder of the various parts. V

Fig, 1 shows the three parts of the fitting ordropper assembly disassembled and spaced relative one another fact that portions of the components are placed under considerable compression during the assembly process.

Another object of the invention is to provide such automatic or hand operated as desired in whole or part Without any loss of capability of assembling the fitting components. 1 I

Another object of the invention is to provide such methods and apparatus wherein the components of the assembly may be driven on one another with sulficient force to deform oneof the members. relative the others ,to form a sealing fit therebetween, this degree offorce applicable without danger to any of the components or the deformed component though some he formed of relatively deformable and resilient material.

prior to assembly, all of the parts being shown in sec:

tion to fully define the nature of the assembly problem sembly will be first described and then the construction I of the assembly apparatus and the method of putting to;

' Another object of .the inventionis to provide meth-j A ods and apparatus which will permit the assembly of the parts of a liquid dropper assembly comprising a pipette, a bulb and a container cap, the assembled} unit having a complete sealing fit between the upper endof the pithe bulb andpipette and the required compression thereof. Other and further objects of the invention'will ap-.

pear in the course of the following description thereof: 'In the drawings, which form a part of the instant specification and are to be read in conjunction-therewith,

there are shown embodiments ofthe invention and, i

gether the dropper assembly. 1

p Referring to the lower element ofthedropper assem bly, at 10' is generally designated the wall ,of the dropper assembly pipette. Pipette 10' has a lower dischargeiend 11 having discharge orifice 12 extending therethrough into the body of the pipette. The pipette consists. of the side wall 10 enclosing a hollow annulus 13. Cap top engaging flange .14 extends circumferentially outwardly from the outer surface of the wall 10 of the pipette adjacent to but below the upper engaging end thereof. The upper end has opening 15 therein communicating with the upper end ofthe annulus 13. The wall of the pipette extends above the flange 14 and preferably is thickened above the flange as shown at 1'6 with also a slightly greater inner diameter than that of the wall 10 below the flange 14 to provide a heavier, less resilient inter. engaging section of the pipette above'the flange. Such thickening together with the greater inner diameter causes an increase in the outer diameter of the pipette above the flange 14. Circumferential head 17, preferably substantially triangular in cross section,-.is formedgon the thickened portion 16 above the flange. The pipette is preferably made of a somewhat resilient, ,yet dimen sionally stable material, such as polyethylene, as itgis necessary that the thickened engaging portion :16- ofthe pipette be slightlycompressed in the interengagement of the parts one with the other yet be resilient enough to at tempt to return or spring back to its original outside diameter. 3

Referring now to the central member of Fig. 1, the cap of the dropper assembly, the cap is generally designated at 18 and comprises a top Wall.19 having a depending side wall 20. The side wall 20 is-preferably' interiorly threaded as at 21 to engagerthe containertop. The cap top wall 19 has hole opening, perforation or orifice 22 therein having tapered upperedge 23 to facilitate the insertion'therein of the bulb lower edgeliand the lower edge thereof formed" inwardly as at =2,4 ;to' Pr a l dg f rea e inn ia et r than. thesis,

her diameter of the perforation 22 in the cap top. The inner surface of the cap top is also recessed as at 25 to form a well to receive the pipette flange 14 when the pipette thickened upper end 16 extends through the perforation 22. The ledge 24 lies within the recess 25.

The diameter of the well 25 is preferably substantially equal to the outer diameter of the flange 1-4 and ispreferably also of a depth substantially equal to the thickness of the flange 14 whereby when the flange I4 is positioned within the well, the thickened portion 16of the pipette extends centrally through the opening 22. The diameter of the hole 22 in the cap is greater than the outer diameter of any part of theupper pipette portion 16, including head 17.

Referring now to the upper member of Fig. l, the bulb, the bulb wall is designated generally at 26 and has closed upper end 27 and opening 28 in its lower engaging end. Cap top abutting flange 29 is formed adjacent to but above the. lower end of the bulb 26 and extends outwardly circumferentially from the side wall thereof. The lower edge of the flange is preferably of greater outer diameter than that of the upper edge to minimize the necessary total size of the bulb flange. The outer diameter of the lower edge of the bulb flange is greater than the diameter of the opening 22 in the cap top 13 whereby the under surface of flange 29 abuts the top surface of cap 18. The engaging portion of the bulb below the fla rge 2? is designated at 30; and is preferably slightly thickened to afford it greater rigidity than that of the bulb wall above the flange which is to be squeezed to expel liquid from the dropper-assembly. The outer diameter of. bulb portion 30 is slightly greater than the diameter of the cap top opening 22 whereby it will be put under compression when forced into the cap opening 22 and. a sealing fit, between the bulb and cap will be achieved. The innersurface of portion 30 is preferably slightly tapered to receive the upper end of the pipette. A circumferential groove 31 (to receive bead 17 on the pipetteyis formed on the inner surface of the bulb adjacent the lower end thereof and preferably oppositeflange 29. The bulb preferably is formed of like material as the pipette to deform under applied force yet tend to return to its original shape.

The length of the lower end'y30 of the bulb below the bottom surface of the flange 29 is preferably slightly greater than the thickness of the cap top from its upper surface to the bottom surface of the well 25. The distance from the lower edge of the groove 31 in the inside surface of the bulb 26 to the lower edge of the bulb is also preferably slightly greater than the distance from the-underside of the bead 17 on the pipette to the upper surface of the pipette flange 14. Thus, if. the bulb and pipette are forced together within the cap top hole 22 so that 'the bead 17 engages the groove 31-, the lowermost edge of the bulb 26 is forced laterally into the groove 24 on the under edge of the cap perforation 22. This aids in the sealing fit of the parts inaddition to the engagement of the flange 14 with the bottom surface of the well 25 and the lower surface of the bulb flange 29 with the top surface of the cap 18. The distance between the upper surface of the pipette flange 14- and the lower surface of the bulb flange 29, when the parts are interengaged, is preferably essentially equal to the distancefrom the surface of the well 25' inthe cap top to the top surface of the cap top itself, whereby the pipette flange and bulp flange are forced into sealing fit against the upper and lower surface of the cap top. As previously noted, since the bulb 26 itself in its lowermost portion 30' is of greater outer diameter than the inner diameter of the opening 22, when the bulb portion 30 is forced within the perforation 22, the lower end of the bulb is placed under compression; The inner diameter of the bulb portion 30- is also formed to be of a lesser innen diameter, even when not engaged by the cap top, than the outer diameter of the thickened pipette portion 16, both in the bead portion 17 and the portion thereof below the head above the flange 14. The upper end 16 of the pipette is thus not only put into compression when the pipette and the bulb are interengaged by the bulb itself, but also additionally by the compression exerted on the bulb lower end 30 by the cap. Thus, a complete sealing fit is afforded by the abutment of the bulb flange 29 with. the top surface of the top of the cap, the abutment of the pipette flange 14 with the surface of the well 25, the lateral forcing of the lower end of the bulb 30 into the groove 24 and the compression of the cap on the outer surface of the bulb and the inner surface of the bulb upon the outer surface of the pipette.

The cap itself preferably is of a greater rigidity than the upper portion of the pipette and the lower portion of the bulb whereby the bulb and pipette will be compressed and any distortion of form will take place in these two members rather than the cap.

From the foregoing description, it is evident that unaided manual assembly of the dropper assembly is almost, if not entirely impossible. This fact arises from the intercompression of the parts when the pipette and bulb are disposed through the cap perforation. If manual assembly is first attempted by seating the cap on the pipette flange with the flange 14 engaging the recess 25, there is a slight clearance between the pipette thickened portion 16 including the bead 17 and the edge of the perforation 22 but not a suflicient amount for the thickened lower portion 30 of the bulb to be forced downwardly between the pipette upper portion 16 and the cap top.

As the bulb itself must be resilient to permit squeezing thereof to expel the contents from the dropper assembly, not very much force can be exerted downwardly on the bulb to wedge it into the gap. Therefore, this method of assembly is entirely unfeasible for manual assembly. On the other hand, if the bulb lower edge 30 is first forced within the perforation 22 so the walls of the perforation slightly compress the lower end of the bulb, the pipette upper end thickened portion 16 must be forced within the opening 28 of the lower end of the bulb with the opening 28 not only naturally of less diameter than the outer diameter of the thickened portion 16 but also an even lesser. diameter because of the compression due to the cap top opening. Also, preferably, the pipette itself is molded. in onepiece and since the upper portion 16 must be sufliciently resilient to be compressed within the bulb lower end 30, the lower wall 10 of the pipette, being of the same material and even thinner than the upper portion 16, is easily deformed and thus only -a limited, amount of force can be applied manually to the pipette. Without going into the difliculties of such procedure in detail, sufiice it to say that it is almost impossible to simultaneously retain the bulb lower edge 30 in the cap perforation 22 and insert the upper portion 16 therein. Therefore, it becomes necessary to provide methods and apparatus for positioning the pipette within the lower end of the bulb with the lower end of the bulb engaged by the cap 18. Such methods and apparatus are doubly necessary in a mass production, high speed operation of assembly of the dropper components.

In the description of the apparatus and method of assembling the components of the dropper assembly, the parts of the dropper assembly will be numbered as in Fig. 1 to facilitate recognition and identification thereof. Figs. 2, 3 and 4 illustrate three consecutive stages in the assembly process and show the essential construction of the apparatus required for the assembly process.

Referring to Fig. 2, at 32 is shown a die operable to receive the bulb 26 and the cap 18 and position them in fixed relationship relative one another in preparation for the insertion of the pipette. 10 within the cap and bulb. Die 32 has recess 33 therein communicating with the upper surface of the die and extending downwardly therein preferably a depth somewhat less than the height of the cap 18. The diameter of the recess 33 preferably is only slightly greater than the outer diameter of the cap side wall 20 whereby the cap will readily fit within the recess 33 yet will be precisely positioned therein. Die 32'also has opening or channel 34 formed centrally in the base of the recess 33 and extending downwardly through the die to receive the bulb 26. The die 32 may be of a thickness from the bottomof the recess 33 to the lower wall of the die 32a greater than the extension of the bulb from thetop of the flange 31 to'the closed end 27 thereof, but preferably is not, whereby the closed end of the bulb extends from the die when positioned therein and pressure from below will unseat the bulb from the channel '34 to permit its removal from the die. The upper portion of the channel 34 adjacent the recess 33 is formed outwardly to provide bulb flange recess 35. The channel 34 is preferably of'a diameter substantially equal to, or slightly less than the outer diameter of the bulb 26 whereby to frictionally confine the bulb within the channel and thediameterof-the flange recess 35 is substantially equal :to, or very slightly less than the outer diameter of the bulb flange 31 whereby to frictionally engage the flange and position it within the recess precisely yet permit easy removal of the bulb. The walls of the flange recess 35 also serve the purpose of reinforcing the bulb against axial application of force thereto in the insertion ofthe enlargedportion 16 of the pipette to prevent expansion, of the bulb and force compression of the pipette end 16r The die 32 may be formed of any desired material, preferably metal, to permit forming thereof to close tolerances and allowanceof a. minimum ofshape change in use under the varied pressures applied in the assembly of the components of the dropper assembly. No mechanical apparatus .is required to insert the cap 18 within the recess 33;.

Referring to Fig. 3', therein is shown, in the upper half of the vfigure,a punch operable to receive the pipette and aid in inserting it within the cap and bulb relative the die. Punch 36 has channel or opening 37 formed therein and extending therethrough preferably at least to the extent. of the length of the pipette'from the lower side of the flange 14 to the open discharge end thereof. Channel 37 is formed of a diameter substantially equalto or slightly less than the outer diameter of the pipette 10 whereby to frictionally grip the pipette over at least a portion of its wall surface below the flange 14. 'The channel 37 should be tapered over its engaging portion to match the taper of the pipette if there'is any. The channel 37 past the engaging portion thereof may be enlarged as at- 38 if desired or may be closely fitted to the pipette all along its length. Channel 37 also has, adjacent its open end which receives the upper end of the pipette, a beveled away portion as at 39 to permit any desired flaring or taper of the pipette as it meets the flange 14. The punch 36 preferably is of an outer diam eter at least substantially equal to the outer diameter of the flange 14. The face of the punch 36 which abuts the underside of the flange 14 may be flat and flush with the underside of the flange 14 whereby to uniformly exert force up on the underside of the flange to force the pipette portion 16 into the open end 28 of the bulb. How ever, the abutting face 40 of the punch 36 preferably is relieved peripherally of a small ring area or portion 41 adjacent the shaft of the pipette with the outer diameter of the ring being less than the diameter of the cap top hole 22. The ring portion 41, then, abuts the underside of the flange with the relieved portion 40 being displaced a few thousandths of an inch from the underside of the flange 14. With this construction of the operating face of the punch 36, force will be applied against the underside of the flange 14 directlythrough the enlarged portion 16 whereby the enlarged portion 16 may be forced into the bulb lower end a little further than when the punch face 40 is flush with the flange 14 all the way, thereby .making sure that the bead 17 passes the groove 31 which it then backs into as the urging force of the punch is relieved. Additionally, this motion of the ring portion 41 of the punch past the base of the recess 25 in the cap aids in laterally deforming the bottom edge 30 of the bulb 26 into the recess or groove 24.

In operation of the method and apparatus, the bulb 26 is inserted in the channel 34 with its closed lower end extending downwardly and out of the lower open end of the channel 34. The bulb flange 29 fits into the bulb flange recess 35 in the die 32 and the lower end 30 of the bulb below the flange 29 extends upwardly into the cap receiving cavity or recess 33. The cap 18 is' then inserted manually or otherwise, as desired, into the cavity or recess 33 with its top wall down so the lower edge 30 of the bulb will engage the opening 22 in the cap top. The beveled upper edge 23 ofthe opening 22 together with the sizing of recess 33 permits immediate engagement of the bulb and cap without any problem of mis'engagement of the bulb portion 30 with the opening 22. As

previously noted, the outer diameter of the bulb portion 30 is greater than the diameter of the cap perforation 22 and, therefore, the bulb portion 30 is compressed and has a lesser inner diameter after the cap is fitted thereover. The diameter of the recess 33 should be close enough to theouter diameter of the cap 18 to precisely position the cap top hole 22 relative the bulb lower end 30. Also, the depth of the cavity 33 should be suflicient that the cap 18 cannot tilt angularly by the time the bevelededge 23 reaches the lower end of the bulb. Once the capis fixed onto the lower end 30 of'the bulb with the cap top surface abutting the underside of flange 29, the cap top will be held relatively firmly by its com pression grip on the bulb lower end and as the bulb flange, 29 is frictionally fitted within the flange recess 35, the wholeassembly of die, bulb and cap will maintain position therein. These facts-permit lateral assembly, if desired. 7 The pipette 16 is fitted into the punch 36 where the engaging portion 37 frictionally engages the pipette wall below the flange 14 'to prevent falling out of the pipetteif the operation is conducted vertically as shown in the figures. The ring portion 41 abuts the underside of the flange 14 immediately opposite the enlarged portion 16 of the pipette. The beveled portion 39 of the punch allows for the increased internal diameter of the pipette above flange 14. Since the outer diameter of flange 14 is only slightly less than the inner diameter of the threaded portions 21 of the cap top, once the punch 36 moves the flange within the cap the flange 14 is correctly positioned for downward movement toward the bulb holding end of the cap. As the outer diameter of the punch 36 is preferably substantially equal to that of the flange 14, the walls of the punch 36 will also be positioned vertically within the cap once they pass into the threaded section. In this manner, vertical alignment of the two parts of the assembly is assured. As the tapered upper end of the pipette head 17 (which is shown extending downwardly) engages the compressed bulb portion 30 it is inwardly compressed by the bulb portion 30 and the surrounding relatively rigid cap top. As the punch 36 continues to be forced downwardly, the portion 16 of the pipette is further compressed upon itself until the bead 17 slips into the groove 31 in the bulb. The resilience of the pipette portion 16 causes the bead 17 to strongly engage the groove 31. The punch may be forced downwardly further a few thousandths of an inch pushing the lower edge of the bead 17 a little past the lower edge of the groove 31 with the flange 14 being slightly curved in cross section by this action. When the bead 17 engages the groove 31, the top surface of the flange 14 has engaged the bottom of the recess 25 to receive the flange in the cap top underside surface. The end portion of the bulb lower edge 30 is squeezed out into the recess 24. Upon raising of the punch 36, the resilience of the pipette portion 16 and the bulb flange 29 and lower portion 30 will cause, in combination with the tapered faces of engagement of the bulb and pipette portions, the bead 17 toslip back into the groove 31. The interengagement of these parts is preferably greater than the frictional engagement of the pipette with the punch whereby the .punch. may be lifted out of the assembly without drawing the whole assembly with it. The frictional engagement of the bulb flange 29 and a portion of the bulb with the flange recess 35 and channel 34 should begreater also than the engagement of the pipette with the punch 36: to avoid such a withdrawing action. With the dropper assembly properly assembled and engaged with the sealing fit between the cap, the bulb lower edge, and the pipette: upper edge, the Whole assembly may be removed from the die 32 by exerting a slight pressure on the closed 'end 27 of the bulb to pop the whole assembly out of the die. With replacement of a new bulb in the die channel 34 and flange recess 35, the assembly operation is ready to continue. It is evident that merely by fixing the position of the die-32 and then attaching the punch 36 to conventional vertical moving apparatus, the entire operation, with the exception of the insertion of the parts in the die and. punch, could be made automatic. On the other hand, the die 35 and the punch 35 may be hand operated items to operate either vertically as shwon, 'orlaterally, or vertically with the bulb portion of the assembly facing downwardly. Since both the pipette and the bulb are frictionally engaged with the punch and die respectively, the positioning of the assembling members relative one another in the assembling operation is not critical.

From the foregoing it will be seen that the invention is well adapted to attain all of the ends and objects hereinbeforeset forth together with other advantages which are inherent to this construction and method.

It will be understood that certain features and subcombinations. are of utility and may be employed without reference to other features and subcombinations. This is contemplated by and is within the scope of the claims.

As many possible embodiments may be made of the invention without departing from the scope thereof, it is to be understood that all matter hereinabove set forth or shown in the accompanying drawings is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. In an apparatus for assembling a three piece dropper assembly made up of, first, a capwith a perforated top, second, a bulb having a flange adjacent its open lower engaging edge adapted to abut the top surface of the cap top, the lower engaging edge of the bulb sized to resiliently fit within the cap top perforation and, third, a

pipette having a flange fixed adjacent its upper open engaging end adapted to abut the inside surface of the cap top, the engaging end of the pipette sized to resiliently fit within the open end of the bulb when the latter is repunch having an opening extending into at least portion thereof and communicating with one surface thereof sized to closely and frictionally receive at least a portion of the discharge end of the pipette, said punch movable relative to the die and having an outer diameter slightly less than the inner diameter of the first recess in the die and cap top When the latter is positioned within the die whereby to be .insertable in both said recess and top, said outer diameter of the punch greater than the inner diameter of the second recess the portion of the punch engaging the underside of the pipette flange comprising only a limited ring circumferential to the punch opening, the outer diameter of said ring being less than the inner diameter of the dropper assemblycap top hole whereby the punch may force the pipette readily and deeply into the bulb.

2. Apparatus as in claim 1 wherein the area of the face of the punch peripheral to the ring is recessed slightly from the ring face to limit the penetration of the punch relative the cap top; I

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 819,340 Coe May 1, 1906 1,311,368 Auble et al July 29, 1919 1,543,088 Ballard June 23, 1925 1,904,931 Rosenberg Apr. 18, 1933 2,090,354 Massman Aug. 17, 1937 2,133,916 Churchill Oct. 18, 1938 2,263,815 Northup Nov. 25, 1941 2,267,126 Moretti Dec. 23, 1941 2,325,209 Swihat July 27, 1943 2,375,574 Metheny et a1 May 8, 1945 2,530,253 Maged et' a1. Nov. 14, 1950 2,586,087 Reynolds et al Feb. 19, 1952 2,728,981 Hooper Jan. 3, 1956 2,763,055 1956 Hardy Sept. 18,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US819340 *Jul 16, 1904May 1, 1906Connecticut Mill Supply CompanyMethod of making spinning-rings.
US1311368 *Mar 1, 1919Jul 29, 1919THE AUBLE BIE a STAMPING COMPANYProcess and apparatus for forming sheet-metal forms
US1543088 *May 13, 1924Jun 23, 1925George W SchofieldBalance-wheel support
US1904931 *Jan 20, 1931Apr 18, 1933Budd Wheel CoMethod of assembling metal members with rubber bushings
US2090354 *May 14, 1936Aug 17, 1937Massman Abraham ECombined medicine dropper and swab
US2133916 *Oct 24, 1936Oct 18, 1938United Carr Fastener CorpMethod of fastening parts by selfpiercing means
US2263815 *Mar 23, 1938Nov 25, 1941Chicago Rawhide Mfg CoMethod of manufacturing oil seals
US2267126 *Jul 18, 1940Dec 23, 1941Moretti HenrySpool
US2325209 *Jul 8, 1940Jul 27, 1943Fred C ZiegDropper stopper
US2375574 *Dec 30, 1942May 8, 1945Cons Aireraft CorpApparatus for fabricating connecting rods
US2530253 *Aug 28, 1947Nov 14, 1950Maged JuliusDrinking spout for cans
US2586087 *Dec 1, 1945Feb 19, 1952Fafnir Bearing CoMethod of applying a seal to a radial groove
US2728981 *Jun 7, 1950Jan 3, 1956Boonton Molding CompanyMethod of making atomizers
US2763055 *Mar 26, 1951Sep 18, 1956Schwitzer CorpMethod of assembling rubber bushings
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3094058 *Aug 28, 1961Jun 18, 1963A O Products CorpVentilator
US3163450 *Sep 14, 1962Dec 29, 1964Jr Harry E EirhartQuick-detachable hydraulic coupling
US3217400 *Feb 23, 1960Nov 16, 1965Illesy OttoMethod of connecting thermoplastic pipe sections and the like
US3273234 *Jun 19, 1963Sep 20, 1966Continental Can CoApparatus for and method of assembling a plastic pull tab with a metal tear strip
US3401447 *May 20, 1966Sep 17, 1968Nelson Mfg Co Inc L RSnap action method of securing a hose fitting to a hose end
US3424481 *Mar 29, 1967Jan 28, 1969Strecton Ind IncClosure fitting for drums
US4089131 *Mar 3, 1977May 16, 1978Trippensee CorporationApparatus for separably coupling a sample container to a sample gathering device
US4126923 *Dec 9, 1976Nov 28, 1978Gateway Industries, Inc.Method for attaching a plastic cover and apparatus employing same
US5015014 *Jun 19, 1989May 14, 1991Aardvark Corporation, Inc.Plastic pipe section
Classifications
U.S. Classification29/235, 29/235.5, 285/260, 285/921, 29/453, 29/451, 29/450
International ClassificationB23P11/00
Cooperative ClassificationB23P11/00, Y10S285/921
European ClassificationB23P11/00