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Publication numberUS2949100 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 16, 1960
Filing dateSep 26, 1958
Priority dateSep 26, 1958
Publication numberUS 2949100 A, US 2949100A, US-A-2949100, US2949100 A, US2949100A
InventorsPetersen Axel L
Original AssigneePetersen Axel L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary engine
US 2949100 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 16, 1960 A. L. PETERSEN ROTARY ENGINE 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Sept. 26, 1958 Axel L. Petersen INVENTOK 9 BY f %w s Sheets-Sheet 2 6 8- \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\I KKK 00 Axel 1.. Pefrsn 1N VENTOR.

mafia... um Many 3m Aug. 16, 1960 A. L. PETERSEN 2,

ROTARY ENGINE Filed Sept. 26, 1958 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Axel L. Petersen V IN VENT OR.

BY QZQ2Y%.

United States 2,949,100 Patented 'Aug. 16, 1960 lice ROTARY ENGINE Axel L. Petersen, Box 97 5, Indio, Calif.

Filed Sept. 26, 1958, Ser. 'No. 763,557

13 Claims. (Cl. 123-43) This invention comprises a novel and useful rotary engine and more particularly relates to a simplification of the construction of engines whereby a greater number of power impulses may be delivered to a driven shaft upon a single rotation of the cylinder and piston elements of the engine.

The primary object of this invention is to provide an internal combustion engine of the rotating cylinder type which will greatly simplify and reduce the number of components of the mechanism by which rotary movement and power is transmitted by the cylinder and piston unit to the power output shaft of the device.

A further object of the invention is to provide an internal combustion engine in accordance with the foregoing object wherein the transmission mechanism between the pistons and the power shaft' shall enable the strokes of the pistons to be varied as to the lengths of strokes of the pistons in their cylinders, the acceleration of the pistons during their strokes, and the number of piston strokes in their cylinders during a single revolution of the cylinders relative to their rotation within the rotor.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide an internal combustion engine as set forth in the foregoing objects which shall utilize a greatly simplified ignition system therein.

An additional important object of the invention is to provide an internal combustion engine in accordance with the preceding objects which shall have an improved cooling of the cylinders and pistons.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully here- 'inafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawing forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

Figure 1 is a side elevational view of a suitable embodiment of internal combustion engine incorporating therein the principles of this invention;

Figures 2 and 3 are respectively end elevational views from the left and right ends of the engine of Figure 1;

Figure 4 is a vertical central longitudinal sectional view taken upon an enlarged scale substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 4-4 of Figure 2, showing the internal construction of the engine, .portions of the cam track forming a part of the transmission mechanism of the engine being shown in dotted lines therein;

Figure 5 is a view similar to Figure 4 but in horizontal section, being taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 5-5 of Figure 4;

Figures 6-8 are vertical transverse sectional views taken substantially upon the planes indicated by the section lines 66, 7-7 and .88 respectively of Figure 4 and showing various structural features of the interior of the engine; and

Figure 9 is a diagrammatic view showing in plan a development of the cam track of the transmission mechanism of the engine.

In the accompanying drawings, for simplicity of illustration in understanding the principles of this inven tion, there has been disclosed an internal combustion engine. It will be understood, however, that various features of this invention, particularly the means used for operatively transmitting the power derived from the various fluids and gases to the power shaft attached to the rotor of the engine has utility and may be successfully employed with other devices than internal combustion engines, as for example with air motors, pumps, steam engines and the like.

Referring first to Figures 1, 4 and 5, it will be seen that the engine, designated generally by the numeral 10, consists of a stator 12, a rotor 14 therein and a power shaft 16 which is connected with the rotor.

The stator comprises a preferably cylindrical casing which at its bottom portion is laterally enlarged to provide a base or mounting flange as at 18 by. which. the device may be mounted upon any suitable support.

Referring now especially to Figures 4 and ,5 it will be seen that the stator 12 which forms the casing previously mentioned has a cylindrical inner surface 20 which bounds a cylindrical opening extending horizontally through the casing and within which the rotor 14 and the transmission mechanism are received.

The casing includes a pair ,of removable end walls 22 and 24, the former having a journal and bearing assembly 26 through which the power shaft 16 extends.

As shown in Figure 1, a .coupling sleeve 28 of any conventional design may be clamped upon the power shaft 16 and to a driven shaft 30 for coupling the rotor shown in Figures 4 and 5,. This sleeve has an outer surface 34 and this outer surface 34 and the inner surface 20 of the stator casing are concentric with each other and with the axis of the power shaft 16 which is also the axis of rotation .of the rotor 14. The inward extremity of the sleeve 32 terminates in spaced relation from the other end wall 22 to provide a chamber or space therebetween which is occupied by a fan 36 which serves the dual functions of inducing a circula- .tion of air through the hollow sleeve 32 into the stator, and also serves to support and connect therotor 14 from the shaft '16. a

As will now be observed from a comparison of Figures 1, 2 and 3, the two end walls 22 and 24 are releasably secured in the opposite ends of the opening in the stator 12 by fastening means such as the Allen head headed screws or bolts 88.

The rotor 14 consists .of a cylindrical body or annulus, see in particular Figures 6-8, which has a cylindrical .opening extending axially therethrough, so that the sleeve 32 is received within this opening and the rotor is received between the sleeve and the casing. A bearing assembly 40 carried by the sleeve 32 adjacent the wall 24 serves to rotatably journal and support the end of the rotor, the other end of the latter being carried 'by the rjournaling of the shafts 16 in the bearing assembly 126. The rotor is thus mounted for rotation about the above mentioned horizontal axis.

Extending axially through the rotor, as will be readily apparent from a comparison of Figures'4, 5, 6, 7 and -8, are a plurality of cylindrical bores 42 which are disposed parallel to the axis of rotation of the rotor and are-equidistant from the latter. These bores comprise the cylinders of the engine. The bores open at the opposite ends of the rotor and suitable annular packing or sealing rings 44 are provided for the opposite ends of these bores, these packing rings having sliding engagement with the inner faces of the end plates 22 and 24 to establish a fluid tight sealed engagement therewith. Inasmuch as the invention set forth and claimed herein does not require any particular construction of packing or sealing rings, a further description or explanation of the same is deemed to be unnecessary.

Slidable in each of the cylinders 42 is a double ended or double headed reciprocating piston 46 which likewise could be of any suitable construction. Extending diametrically through each piston is a pin 48 which also projects through the diametrically disposed longitudinally extending slots 50 formed in the rotor. The outer ends of these pins are received in cam tracks to be hereinafter described so that upon reciprocation of the piston in response to the application of propulsion fluid to the opposite ends thereof, the reciprocation of the pistons in r the slots reacting against the stationary cam tracks will effect rotation of the rotor.

The pins 48 form part of a transmission mechanism by which fluid pressure applied to the pistons effecting reciprocation of the latter is transmitted to the power shaft 16. This transmission mechanism includes a pair of cam tracks, one carried by the inner surface of the casing 12, and the other carried by the outer surface of the sleeve 32. Since these cam tracks are necessarily of identical contour and shape, a showing and description of one will suflice for an understanding of both. The outer cam track comprises a ring 52 which is seated upon the inner surface 20 of the stator and is detachably secured thereto and mounted thereon as by fastening bolts 54. A sinuous cam groove 56 is formed in that surface of the ring 52 which is adjacent to the rotor. A similar cam surface or cam track 58 is formed in the outer surface of the sleeve 32.

Figure 9 indicates a satisfactory shape or contour for this cam track. Inasmuch as the two cam tracks, the inner track and the outer track are necessarily identical, Figure 9 is a diagrammatic representation of the contour of the outer cam track 56 which is formed as a groove in the ring 52. As will be noted from Figure 9, and from the showing in Figures 4 and 5, the cam track 58 is of a wavy contour having a series of reaches of maximum axial extent in one direction as at 60, interpersed with other reaches of maximum axial extent in the other direction as at 62. It will thus be seen that the cam follower constituted by the extremities of the pins 48 when riding in this track will at the position 60 cause the pistons to be moved into their closest proximity to the end wall 22 which comprises the cylinder head, while the reaches 62 will cause the other end of the pistons to move into the maximum or closest proximity to the other end wall 24.

Obviously, any suitable number of the positions 60 and 62 may be provided depending upon the number of strokes which it is desired to impart to the pistons during a single rotation of the rotor. Also, any suitable number of cylinders may be provided as desired. The provision of four cylinders together with four of the opposite reaches 60 and 62 are deemed to be satisfactory for the purposes of illustrating the operation of this invention. Further, obviously any desired contour can be given to the cam tracks 56 in order to provide any desired rate of acceleration of the pistons or length of stroke of the same.

Annular sealing rings 64 and 66 are provided at the opposite sides of the outer cam tracks 52, being received in circumferentially extending channels or slots in the concave surface of the ring 52 and in the convex surface of the rotor. Similarly, a second set of annular sealing rings as at 68 and 70 are provided between the sleeve 32 and the adjacent surface of the rotor for the same purpose. These rings serve to retain lubricant supplied in any desired manner to the piston and to the transmission mechanism at the areas which it is desired to lubricate as will be apparent from Figures 4 and 5.

Means are provided for delivering a propulsive fluid into the cylinders and for educting the same therefrom. This means takes the form of ports 72 and 74 in the plate 22 and corresponding ports 76 and 78 in the opposite plate 24. These ports are so positioned that they will in turn register with the adjacent ends of each cylinder as the rotor evolves. Suitable means, not shown, will be connected to the exterior of the plate at the ports 72 and 74 and 76 and 78 for the purpose of supplying a propulsive fluid to the cylinders through one port of each set and educting the propulsive fluid therefrom through the other port.

Where the engine is employed as an internal combustion engine, the supply port will deliver a combustible mixture from a carburetor or other suitable source, not shown, while the products of combustion will be educted from the other ports. Where the device is employed, however, as a steam engine, air motor or the like, other propulsive fluids will be applied to and delivered from the cylinders in the same manner.

Inasmuch as there are numerous methods and appara tuses by which propulsive fluids may be supplied to or removed from the rotor of engines of this general character, and since the principles of this invention are not limited to any particular means, a further consideration of the same is deemed to be unnecessary for the purposes of this invention.

Where the engine is employed as an internal combustion engine, it is of course necessary to provide means for igniting the combustible charge supplied to the engine. For that purpose, there are provided a pair of spark plugs as those shown at 80 and 82. It will be understood that any desired ignition system will be provided, suitably connected to these spark plugs. These plugs are mounted in and extend through the two end plates 22 and 24 as shown in Figures 4 and 5 so that they will communicate with the interior of each of the cylinders in turn as the rotor turns, and a properly timed electric spark from the plug will thus effect ignition of the combustible mixture in the cylinders at the appropriate portion of their rotation.

Thus, with the four cam reaches shown in Figures 4, 5 and 9, one rotation of the rotor will cause each piston to make two reciprocations in the cylinder, thus performing the four customary strokes of a four cycle engine and producing one power impulse from each end of each cylinder for each revolution of the power shaft 16. It is evident that with other shapes of cam tracks, with a different number of reaches therein, and with an appropriate distance position of the fluid supply ports and exhaust ports, together with appropriate additional arrangements of the plugs, any desired number of explosions can be produced during one revolution of the shaft.

A cooling system is provided which includes the previously mentioned cooling fan 36. This fan induces a flow of air through the interior of the sleeve 32 and into the stator. In addition, there are provided a series of circumferentially spaced slots 84 in the sleeve which communicate with the space between the sleeve and the rotor, and between the sealing rings 70 previously mentioned and a similar ring 86. This air serves to cool the concave inner surface of the rotor between the rotor and the sleeve. Additional air cooling means is provided by a series of fan blades 88 formed upon the convex exterior surface of the rotor at either end thereof, and which blades extend into the space between the rotor and the inner surface 20 of the stator. A plurality of ports such as those indicated at 90 and 92 in the end walls 24 and 22, and at 94 in the casing 12 serves an inlet and outlet means for air which is induced by the rotation of the fan blades 88.v

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that there has been provided an internal combustion engine in which the construction and the elements required therefor have been reduced to a minimum, thereby rendering the engine very compact, of low Weight per horsepower and relatively simple to assemble or. disassemble. In addition, the engine produces a great number" of power impulses upon the powershaft, utilizes: compact air cooling means and a simplified ignition" system. The transmission means may be readily assembled or disassembled, since as shown in Figure there are provided a pair of aligned internally threaded openings 96 and 98 in the stator casing 12 and. in the ring 52 through which the pins 48 may be withdrawn when aligned therewith, a closure plug 100 serving to close these openings when not in use.

There is also provided in the two end plates 22 and 24 respectively a pair of screw threadedly engaged access plates 1G2 and 104 with which the pistons may be aligned for withdrawal of the pistons therethrough when the piston pin is removed through the aligned openings 96 and 104 This facilitates removal of the pistons for servicing and their restoration to the cylinders.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly, all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. A rotating cylinder engine comprising a stator, a rotor therein and a power shaft connected to said rotor, said stator comprising a cylindrical casing having an opening therein, a pair of end walls mounted in the ends of said opening and secured to said casing, one of said end walls having a centrally disposed tubular sleeve reentrant into said opening, the inner surface of said casing and the outer surface of said sleeve being concentric and defining an annular chamber therebetween, means journaling said rotor for rotation in said annular chamber about an axis concentric with said inner and outer surfaces, a plurality of cylinders extending axially through said rotor and disposed parallel to and equidistant from said axis, sealing means at the opposite ends of each cylinder slidably engaging an end wall, double ended pistons slidably received in each cylinder, 21 pair of sinuous inner and outer cam tracks on said inner and outer surfaces, a cam follower carried by each piston and slidably employed in each cam track, means for supplying and means for exhausting propulsive fluid from said cylinders.

2. The combination of claim 1 wherein said power shaft is journaled in and extends through the other of said end walls.

3. The combination of claim 1 including ignition means for said engine including a spark plug mounted in each end wall for communication with the interior of each cylinder in succession upon rotation of said rotor.

4. A rotating cylinder engine comprising a stator, a rotor therein and a power shaft connected to said rotor, said stator comprising a cylindrical casing having an opening therein, a pair of end walls mounted in the ends of said opening and secured to said casing, one of said end walls having a centrally disposed tubular sleeve reentrant into said opening, the inner surface of said casing and the outer surface of said sleeve being concentric and defining an annular chamber therebetween, means journaling said rotor for rotation in said annular chamber about an axis concentric with said inner and outer surfaces, a plurality of cylinders extending axially through said rotor and disposed parallel to and equidistant from. said axis, sealing means at the opposite ends of each cylinder, slidably engaging an end wall, double-ended pistons slidably received at each cylinder, a pair of sinuous inner and outer cam tracks on said inner and outer surfaces, a cam follower carried by each piston and slidably employed in each cam track, means for supplying and means for exhausting propulsive fluid for said cylinders, an air cooling system for said engine comprising a fan disposed in said stator in. alignment with said sleeve and secured to said rotor for propelling air through the latter, passage means establishing communication between the interior of said sleeve and between the latter and said rotor.

5. A rotating cylinder engine comprising a stator, a rotor therein and a power shaft connected to said rotor, said stator comprising a cylindrical casing having an opening therein, a pair of end walls mounted in the ends of said opening and secured to said casing, one of said end walls having a centrally disposed tubular sleeve reentrant into said opening, the inner surface of said casing and the outer surface of said sleeve being concentric and defining an annular chamber therebetween, means journaling said rotor for rotation in said annular chamber about an axis concentric with said inner and outer surfaces, a plurality of cylinders extending axially through said rotor and disposed parallel to and equidistant from said axis, sealing means at the opposite ends of each cylinder, slidably engaging an end wall, doubleended pistons slidably received at each cylinder, a pair of sinuous inner and outer cam tracks on said inner and outer surfaces, a cam follower carried by each piston and slidably employed in each cam track, means for supplying and means for exhausting propulsive fluid for said cylinders, an air cooling system for said engine comprising a fan disposed in said stator in alignment with said sleeve for propelling air through the latter, passage means establishing communication between the interior of said sleeve and between the latter and said rotor, said fan including air propelling blades secured to the inner circumference of said rotor, air inlet and outlet openings in said stator operatively associated with said blades.

6. A rotating cylinder engine comprising a stator, a rotor therein and a power shaft connected to said rotor, said stator comprising a cylindrical casing having an opening therein, a pair of end walls mounted in the ends of said opening and secured to said casing, one ,of said end Walls having a centrally disposed tubular sleeve reentrant into said opening, the inner surface of said casing and the outer surface of said sleeve being concentric and defining an annular chamber therebetween, means journaling said rotor for rotation in said annular chamber about an axis concentric with said inner and outer surfaces, a plurality of cylinders extending axially through said rotor and disposed parallel to and equidistant from said axis, sealing means at the opposite ends of each cylinder, slidably engaging an end wall, double-ended pistons slidably received at each cylinder. a pair of sinuous inner and outer cam tracks on said inner and outer surfaces, a cam follower carried by each piston and slidably employed in each cam track, means for supplying and means for exhausting propulsive fluid for said cylinders, air propelling blades disposed in said stator and mounted on the inner circumference of said rotor, air inlet and outlet openings in said stator operatively associated with said blades.

7. A rotating cylinder engine comprising a stator, a rotor therein and a power shaft connected to said rotor, said stator comprising a cylindrical casing having an opening therein, a pair of end Walls mounted in the ends of said opening and secured to said casing, one of said end walls having a centrally disposed tubular sleeve reentrant into said opening, the inner surface of said casing and the outer surface of said sleeve being concentric and defining an annular chamber therebetween,

means journaling said rotor for rotation in said annular chamber about an axis concentric with said inner and outer surfaces, a plurality of cylinders extending axially through said rotor and disposed parallel to and equidistant from said axis, sealing means at the opposite ends of each cylinder, slidably engaging an end wall, double-ended pistons slidably received at each cylinder, a pair of sinuous inner and outer cam tracks on said inner and outer surfaces, a cam follower carried byeach piston and slidably employed in each cam track, means for supplying and means for exhausting propulsive fluid for said cylinders, an air cooling system for said engine comprising a fan in said stator in alignment with said sleeve for propelling air through the latter, passage means establishing communication between the interior of said sleeve and between the latter and said rotor, said power shaft being disposed centrally of said annular rotor, said fan lying between said shaft and rotor and connecting the former to the latter.

8. A rotating cylinder engine comprising a stator, a rotor therein and a power shaft connected to said rotor, said stator comprising a cylindrical casing having an opening therein, a pair of end walls mounted in the ends of said opening and securing to said casing, one of said end walls having a centrally disposed tubular sleeve reentrant into said opening, the inner surface of said casing and the outer surface of said sleeve being concentric and defining an annular chamber therebetween, means journaling said rotor for rotation in said annular chamber about an axis concentric with said inner and outer surfaces, a plurality of cylinders extending axially through said rotor and disposed parallel to and equidistant from said axis, sealing means at the opposite ends of each cylinder, slidably engaging an end wall, double-ended piston slidably received at each cylinder, a pair of sinuous inner and outer cam tracks on said inner and outer surfaces, a cam follower carried by each piston and slidably employed in each cam track, means for supplying and means for exhausting propulsive fluid for said cylinders, the outer cam track comprising a cylindrical ring, means mounting said ring on said inner surface of said casing.

9. A rotating cylinder engine comprising a stator, a rotor therein and a power shaft connected to said rotor, said stator comprising a cylindrical casing having an opening therein, a pair of end walls mounted in the ends of said opening and secured to said casing, one of said end walls having a centrally disposed tubular sleeve reentrant into said opening, the inner surface of said casing and the outer surface of said sleeve being concentric and defining an annular chamber therebetween, means journaling said rotor for rotation in said annular chamber about an axis concentric with said inner and outer surfaces, a plurality of cylinders extending axially through said rotor and disposed parallel to and equidistant from said axis, sealing means at the opposite ends of each cylinder, slidably engaging an end wall, double-ended pistons slidably received at each cylinder, a pair of sinuous inner and outer cam tracks on said inner and outer surfaces, a cam follower carried by each piston and slidably employed in each cam track, means for supplying and means for exhausting propulsive fluid for said cylinders, the outer cam track comprising a cylindrical ring, means mounting said ring on said inner surface of said casing, aligned openings in said ring and in said casing, said cam follower including a pin extending diametrically through its piston and cylinder and being insertable and removable therefrom through said aligned openings, a closure plug for said aligned openings.

10. The combination of claim 9 wherein said cylinders have each diametrically oppositely disposed longitudinal slots slidably receiving said pins.

11. A rotating cylinder engine comprising a stator, a rotor therein and a power shaft connected to said rotor, said stator comprising a cylindrical casing having an opening therein, a pair of end walls mounted in the ends of said opening and secured to said casing, one of said end walls having a centrally disposed tubular sleeve reentrant into said opening, the inner surface of said casing and the outer surface of said sleeve being concentric and defining an annular chamber therebetween, means journaling said rotor for rotation in said annular chamber about an axis concentric with said inner and outer surfaces, a plurality of cylinders extending axially through said rotor and disposed parallel to and equidistant from said axis, sealing means at the opposite ends of each cylinder, slidably engaging an end wall double-ended pistons slidably received at each cylinder, a pair of sinuous inner and outer cam tracks on said inner and outer surfaces, a cam follower carried by each piston and slidably employed in each cam track, means for supplying and means for exhausting propulsive fluid for said cylinders, the outer cam track comprising a cylindrical ring, means mounting said ring on said inner surface of said casing, annular sealng rings disposed between said rotor and said ring and said sleeve at the opposite ends of said rotor.

12. The combination of claim 1 wherein said end walls have aligned openings and closure plates for the passage of said pistons through said openings when aligned therewith.

13. A rotating cylinder engine comprising a stator, a rotor therein and a power shaft connected to said rotor, said stator comprising a cylindrical casing having an opening therein, a pair of end walls mounted in the ends of said opening and secured to said casing, one of said end walls having a centrally disposed tubular sleeve reentrant into said opening, the inner surface of said casing and the outer surface of said sleeve being concentric and defining an annular chamber therebetween, means journaling said rotor for rotation in said annular chamber about an axis concentric with said inner and outer surfaces, a plurality of cylinders extending axially through said rotor and disposed parallel to and equidistant from said axis, sealing means at the opposite ends of each cylinder, slidably engaging an end wall, double-ended pistons slidably received at each cylinder, a pair of sinuous inner and outer cam tracks on said inner and outer surfaces, a cam follower carried by each piston and slidably employed in each cam track, means for supplying and means for exhausting propulsive fluid for said cylinders, the outer cam track comprising a cylindrical ring, means mounting said ring on said inner surface of said casing, aligned openings in said ring and in said casing, said cam follower including a pin extending diametrically through its piston and cylinder and being insertable and removable therefrom through said aligned openings, a closure plug for said aligned openings, said end walls having aligned openings and closure plates for the passage of said pistons therethrough when the pistons are aligned therewith and said pins are removed through the first mentioned aligned openings.

Eteferences Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,276,346 Gould Aug. 20, 1918 1,614,476 Hutchinson Jan. 18, 1927 1,987,699 Moore Jan. 15, 1935 2,276,772 Heap Mar. 17, 1942 FOREIGN PATENTS 561.745 France Aug. 16, 1923

Patent Citations
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US1276346 *Apr 4, 1917Aug 20, 1918Edward G GouldRotary engine.
US1614476 *Mar 30, 1916Jan 18, 1927Motor Patents CorpRotary internal-combustion engine
US1987699 *Oct 16, 1930Jan 15, 1935George Moore FrederickTurbine engine
US2276772 *Mar 11, 1938Mar 17, 1942Furman WilliamsTurbine
FR561745A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3068709 *Jan 15, 1960Dec 18, 1962Petersen Axel LRoller and wrist pin construction for rotary engines
US4117770 *May 13, 1976Oct 3, 1978Gennady Petrovich KoshelenkoAxial-piston hydraulic machine
US5209190 *Jul 1, 1991May 11, 1993Eddie PaulRotary power device
US6401671 *May 10, 1999Jun 11, 2002Malcolm LeathwaiteDraw rotary engine
US6601547 *Oct 15, 2001Aug 5, 2003Osama M. Al-HawajAxial piston rotary power device
US6601548 *Dec 13, 2001Aug 5, 2003Osama M. Al-HawajAxial piston rotary power device
US6672263Mar 6, 2002Jan 6, 2004Tony VallejosReciprocating and rotary internal combustion engine, compressor and pump
DE3019586A1 *May 22, 1980Dec 4, 1980Haakon Henrik KristiansenBrennkraftmaschine und deren betriebsprozess
WO1994025744A1 *Apr 28, 1993Nov 10, 1994Eddie PaulRotary power device
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/43.0AA, 91/502, 74/57, 92/57
International ClassificationF01B3/00, F01B3/04, F02B57/00
Cooperative ClassificationF01B3/0032, F02B57/00, F01B3/04
European ClassificationF01B3/00B, F01B3/04