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Publication numberUS2949370 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 16, 1960
Filing dateSep 23, 1957
Priority dateSep 23, 1957
Publication numberUS 2949370 A, US 2949370A, US-A-2949370, US2949370 A, US2949370A
InventorsHughes William L
Original AssigneeRee Ceel Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Package
US 2949370 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1960 L. HUGHES 2,949,370

PACKAGE Filed Sept. 23, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 {NVENTOR z 4 WILL/AM L. HUGHES BY WWQLM AGENTS s- 9 w. L. HUGHES 2,949,370

PACKAGE Filed Sept. 23, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR WILL/AM L. HUG/4E5 AGENTS W. L. HUGHES Aug. 16, 1960 PACKAGE 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Sept. 23, 1957 v INVENTOR WILL/AM L. HUGHES .AGENTS PACKAGE 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 FilGi-d Sept. 23, 1957 INVENTOR ATTORNEY United States Patent PACKAGE William L. Hughes, Norfolk, Va., assignor to Ree-Ceel Corporation, Norfolk, Va., a corporation of Virginia Filed Sept. 23, 1957, Ser. No. 685,689

14 Claims. (Cl. 99-173) The present invention relates to packages, and more particularly to new and novel packages for maintaining materials present therein, which are normally susceptible to air and moisture, in an original package state after repeated use of such materials, and machines for making same.

At the present time a wide variety of products are packaged which, when opened, are susceptible to hydration, dehydration, oxidation, spoilage and like action, thus rendering the product incapable of proper storage in the original package for later use. A great many edible products fall in this category such as, for example, bread, rolls, cake, cookies, potato chips, popcorn, saltines,

cereals, flour, meats, particularly sliced luncheon meats,-

cheeses, vegetables, sugar, marshmallows, pickles, etc. Such edible products -when once opened, if not consumed in their entirety originally, do not remain in a fresh state and therefore are not appealing and are not palatable to the purchaser. This results in considerable economical loss to the consumer since stale bread, soggy potato chips, dried out meats, and the like are generally thrown out rather than eaten in the state after being stored for reuse.

A great many other products which do not fall in the edible or food category suffer a similar disadvantage. For example, mortar, lime, cement, plaster of Paris, and like materials or chemicals which absorb moisture cannot be stored over a period of time after being once opened, thus resulting in considerable waste and economic loss to the user. A number of fertilizers are similarly subject to moisture absorption. Such products, although capable of still being used after storage, oftentimes necessitate considerable reworking on the part of the user before being capable of being spread, particularly if a mechanical spreader is being used.

There are other fields in which non-food products are packaged which necessitate separate storage means for maintaining the products after use. For example, in the diaper service industry, diapers are usually delivered in packaged form periodically to the user. As the diapers are used on the infant, the custom is to place the soiled ones in a receptacle which endeavors to retain the odors therein. This receptacle, in addition to being an added cost, quite often fails to remain in an airtight state, thus permitting odors to arise therefrom, and thus becomes objectionable to the customer. This same disadvantage of separate storage means for packaged articles after being opened exists in many industries.

In the elimination of the foregoing and related disadvantages as well as providing packages having new uses, it is a principal object of the present invention to pro vide a package which will retain the material therein in an original state condition after having been opened.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of a new and novel package having a permanent seal and a separate resealable seal means.

A still further object of the present invention is the provision of a package having permanent sealing means and a separate pressure-sensitive resealable means.

2,949,370 Patented Aug. 16, 19%0 "ice Another object is to provide a resealable seal portion that can be opened and closed quite easily.

Yet another object of the present invention is the provision of a package which after the normal permanent seal has been broken, the package may be rescaled and maintain the material carried therein in an original state condition.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of an edible product package from which a portion of said product may be taken, with the remaining portion stored in the package without fear of spoilage and the like.

A further object of the present invention is the provision of a package for maintaining products susceptible to moisture and the like which will permit the unused portion to be stored in the original package in a tightly sealed state without damage from moisture and the like.

Still another object of the present invention is the provision of a package having a new and novel resealable portion.

A further object of the present invention is the provision of a package for storing liquid products therein in an airtight, watertight state.

Yet another object of the present invention is the provision of a package having a permanent seal and resealable seal portion, the latter being free from contact with the product until the permanent seal is broken.

A further object of the present invention is the provision of a package which will possess a twofold function, carrying the goods as well as providing means for storage of such goods.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of apparatus for producing new and novel packages in the present invention.

A still further object of the present invention is the provision of apparatus for producing new and novel packages of the present invention which may be associated with a conventional wrapping machine with virtually no difiiculty.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide an extremely simple, inexpensive apparatus for producing the packages of the present invention.

, Other and additional objects of the present invention will become manifest from the ensuing description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

Broadly stated, the package made in accordance with the present invention comprises a receptacle body, a permanent seal for said receptacle body, and a separate rescalable portion for rescaling the receptacle body upon breaking of the permanent seal.

To the accomplishment of the foregoing and related ends, the present invention then consists of the means hereinafter fully described and particularly pointed out in the claims, the annexed drawing and the following description setting forth in detail certain means in the carrying out of the invention, such disclosed means illustrating, however, but one of various ways in which the principle of the invention may be employed.

The present invention is illustrated, by way of example, in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a packaged article made in accordance with the present invention showing the permanent seal and the resealable seal portion.

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the package shown in Fig. l, with the permanent seal removed.

Fig. 3 of the present invention is a perspective view of a loaf of bread wrapped and packaged in accordance with the present invention.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary enlarged side elevation in cross-section of the neck portion of a receptacle illustrating one form of association of the permanent seal and the resealable portion in accordance with the present invention.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary enlarged side elevation in cross-section of a neck portion of a package made in accordance with the present invention showing the resealable portion sealed in closed relationship.

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary side elevation in cross-section illustrating another form of a resealable seal in accordance with the present invention.

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary side elevation in cross-section of a neck portion and a bag made in accordance with the present invention illustrating still another form of a resealable seal portion.

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary side elevation in cross-section of a neck portion and a bag portion made in accordance with the present invention illustrating still another form of a reseal portion.

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary side elevation in cross-section of a neck portion and a bag made in accordance with the present invention illustrating still another form of a reseal portion.

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary side elevation in cross-section of a neck portion and a bag made in accordance with the present invention illustrating still another form of a reseal portion.

Fig. 11 is a fragmentary perspective view of apparatus made in accordance with the present invention illustrating the producing of a package.

Fig. 12 is a diagrammatic view of another form of apparatus made in accordance with the present invention for producing a package.

Fig. 13 is a diagrammatic view of another form of apparatus made in accordance with the present invention for producing a package.

Fig. 14 is a perspective view of another form of package made in accordance with the present invention, with the permanent seal broken.

Fig. 15 is a perspective view of a liquid container made in accordance with the present invention illustrating the relationship of the permanent seal and the reseal portlon.

Fig. 16 is an enlarged fragmentary side elevation of the liquid product package shown in Fig. 15, with the package in pouring condition.

Fig. 17 is a perspective view of still another form of liquid package made in accordance with the present invention showing the package in an opened state.

Fig. 18 is a top plan view of still another form of package made in accordance with the present invention. Fig. 19 is a View taken on lines 19-19 of Fig. 18.

Fig. 20 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view of the View shown in Fig. 19 in an opened condition.

Fig. 2.1 is a fragmentary top plan view of a particular reseal construction.

Fig. 22 is a top plan View of another form of reseal construction.

Fig. 23 is a diagrarmnatic view of another form of apparatus made in accordance with the present invention for producing packages in accordance with the present invention.

Fig. 24 is a diagrammatic view of another form of apparatus made in accordance with the present invention for producing packages in accordance vtu'th the present invention.

Referring now to the drawings, and with particular reference to Figs. 1, 2, 4, and 5, an illustrative embodiment of one form of package made in accordance with the present invention and generally designated by reference numeral 10 is shown. The bag 19' may be made from any suitable material that is now employed in bag manufacture, such as, for example, paper, plastic and metal foil, translucent, transparent, and non-transparent material.

The bag 10 comprises a body portion 11 that is of conventional sack design and includes a base 12 and a pair of foldable side edges 13 on either side of the body portion 11. The body portion 11 is provided with a neck portion 14 which, as shown in Fig. 4, comprises a lower portion 15 and an upper portion 16 which are connected to one another in spaced relationship around the complete periphery of the neck portion by resealable means 17. The upper free end of the upper neck portion 16 is provided with permanent seal means 18. The permanent seal 18 may be any seal means at present in use today for permanently sealing packages such as, for example, adhesive means applied to the inside face about the periphery of the free ends of the upper neck portion 16, with the ends being held in an adhesive relationship to one another. Other permanent seal means that may be used are sealing tapes, mechanical closures, staple, etc.

The resealable means 17 preferably is in the form of a pressure-sensitive tape which is secured to the bag '10 by having same adhesively secured to the spaced upper and lower neck portions 15 and 16 around the complete periphery of each element. The opposite face of the resealable means is smooth and will give the appearance of an unbroken neck portion for the bag.

As shown in Fig. 4, the lower and upper neck portions 15 and 16 are in spaced relation, leaving the center portion of the pressure-sensitive surface of a tape in an exposed relationship for engagement with itself, and which when pulled flat will provide a tight permanent seal in a manner to be more fully described hereinafter. It should be noted that the width of the adhesive mass lying between the spaced ends of the lower and upper neck portions 15 should be such that it will provide a suflicient lateral adhesive area to positively insure the resealing of the neck portion 14.

As hereinbefore indicated, the resealable means 17 may be any pressure-sensitive t-ape. In general, the tape will comprise a transparent, opaque, or translucent flexi- 'ble base sheet made of regenerated cellulose or like material, and having an adhesive m-ass applied on one face thereof in the form of a thin film to provide the pressuresensitive surface. The opposite face will be quite smooth. In general, the adhesive mass will comprise an elastomer, a plasticizer, and a filler, as Well as other preservatives such as anti-oxidants. In employing pressure-sensitive tape with food packages wherein food may come into contact with an adhesive surface, care should be taken that the adhesive mass is of a character such that it will not prove deleterious or harmful to the food product.

The bag 10 is generally used to illustrate any receptacle and may contain 'any material therein. For example, the bag 10 may contain popcorn, potato chips, cereals, marshallo-ws, vegetables, and similar edible products as well as any non-edible products. It is to be clearly understood that in packing any particular item, the shape or configuration of the bag 10 will vary. For example, in packaging pre-sliced cheese or luncheon meat, the bag 10 will be in the form of a square with the body portion tightly enveloping the material. However, the neck portion of such a package will be virtually identical with that of neck portion 14', or any, of the other modifications hereinafter described may be used.

In the producing of the bag 10, it may be made in any suitable manner 'With the resealable means 17 being applied by the bag manufacturer and sold to the packer in this state. Alternatively, a packer mayform the bag and apply the resealable seal means thereon at the site of packaging by employing a machine made in accordance with the present invention, which will be described more fully hereinafter.

In utilizing the present invention, the bag 10 is filled or formed around the material to be packaged by the packer in the customary manner, with the reseal means 17 either previously applied by the bag manufacturer, or applied during the packaging operation. The permanent seal 18 is applied at the finishing of the packaging operation in the ordinary manner employed with the particular material being packed and is shipped for sale. The purchaser of the packaged material, to open the bag 10, removes or tears the permanent seal 18 from the remainder of the bag at a point intermediate the permanent seal means 18 and the reseal means 17. As shown in Fig. 2, the importance of this is that it will provide a circular tab portion having no adhesive material thereon forward of the reseal means 17 for the purchaser to grasp, thereby facilitating the re-opening 'or re-closing of the bag after it has been once opened. The purchaser may take what he desires from the bag and then reseal the bag by pressing along the outside surface of the reseal means 17 with the thumb and fore-finger of each hand on opposite sides thereof. This operation, as shown in Fig. 5, results in the pressure-sensitive surface of the reseal means 17 coming into tight adhesive engagement with itself in a fiat state and thereby sealing the bag in a completely airtight state.

Reference is now to be had to Fig. 3 wherein an illustrative packaged loaf of bread made in accordance with the present invention and generally designated by reference numeral 20 is shown. 'The bread package 20 is conventional in design and includes a main body wrapper 21 having folded end portions 22 at opposite ends thereof.

The folded end portions 22 at each end are adhesively secured to one another to form a permanent seal at each end thereof. This wrapper construction is virtually the same for all bread marketed today. The main body wrapper 21 immediately adjacent one of the end portions 21 has a narrow slot formed therein which extends completely around the body wrapper 21 in transverse relationship thereto. This results in one end portion 22 and small portion of the body wrapper 21 being completely spaced from the remainder of the wrapper. The spaced ends of the body wrapper 21 are connected to one another by reseal means 23 which preferably is in the form of a transparent or translucent strip of pressuresensitive tape. The reseal means 23 will provide a pressuresensitive surface spanning the distance between the spaced ends of the body wrapper 21 and extending completely therearound to permit rescaling of the package, as will be described more fully hereinafter. The op posite face of the reseal means 23 will be smooth and will give the appearance of an integral part of the main body wrapper.

To use the bread package 20, the permanent seal at the end portion 22 adjacent the reseal means 23 is broken and the desired number of slices are removed. The user then, by means of the thumb and forefinger of each hand, presses against opposite sides of the bread wrapper along the reseal means 23. This results in a flattening of the reseal means 23 with a corresponding engagement of the pressure-sensitive surface of the reseal means with itself to produce a complete-1y airtight sealing strip with a corresponding airtight package being produced in the manner shown in Fig. 5.

The normal procedure employed by bakeries in producing bread packages is to purchase bread paper in the form of large continuous rolls rather than preformed bags or wrappers. Thus the baker forms the bread packages on his own pemises using his own wrapping machine. Therefore, it will be found generally more desirable to apply the reseal means to the bread wrapper paper at the bakery just prior to or in the wrapping machine. Apparatus for this purpose and forming a part of the present invention is described hereinafter. However, it is to be understood that the bread package 20 may be formed by utilizing wrapper paper that has the reseal means previously applied by the manufacturer.

Reference is now to be had to Fig. 6 wherein a fragmentary neck portion, generally designated by reference numeral 24, forming a part of a double bag or bag having aliner is shown embodying the present invention. The neck portion 24 of the bag has an outer lower neck porb tion 25 and an upper neck portion 26 which are spaced from one another. Similarly, the neck portion 24 is provided with a lower inner neck portion 27 and an upper inner neck portion 28 which are likewise spaced from one another. The spacing between the inner neck portions 27 and 28 will be less than the outer neck portions 25 and 26 in order to insure the securing of the spaced ends of the inner neck portions 27 and 28 to the reseal means 29. The reseal means 29 in the form of a pressure-sensitive tape is secured to and connects the free ends of the outer neck portions 25 and 26 to one another as Well as the inner neck portions 27 and 28, with the pressure-sensitive adhesive mass spanning the distance between the spaced ends completely therearound. This construction results in the spaced ends of both the inner and outer neck portions 25, 26, 27, and 28 being secured to the reseal means 29 and providing a pressure-sensitive surface extending internally around the periphery of the neck portion 24. The opposite ends of the outer and inner upper neck portions 26 and 28 will be provided with a permanent seal (not shown) such as, for example, adhesive means, staple, and the like. The operation of a bag employing the neck portion 24 is the same general one to be followed as hereinbefore described with other forms of the invention. A user \m'll remove the permanent seal and take what portion of the material he needs. To reseal the bag, the neck portion 24 is placed in a fiat state with the peripherally extending pressure-sensitive surface in engagement with itself. Pressure on both sides of the neck portion will tightly reseal the bag.

This type of resealable neck structure will be found to be of particular utility with bags containing chemicals affected by air or moisture, such as, for example, lime, mortar, and the like, wherein double bags or a bag and a liner are particularly employed. When materials of this type are packaged, it is usually in the form of fifty or one hundred pound bags. Accordingly, in packages of this size it will be found desirable to have the reseal means 29 in the form of a heavy pressure-sensitive tape. Moreover, the tape should be of a width greater than that used with smaller packages so that the lateral width of the pressure-sensitive adhesive mass or film not in engagement with the neck portion will be sufiicient to form a wide tight bond so as to properly reseal the bag in an airtight and moisture-proof state.

An alternative neck structure for use with double bags of this type (not shown) is to have only the lower and upper portions 27 and 28 of the inner bag or liner spaced from one another and connected to one another by the reseal means 29, thereby leaving the neck portion of the outer bag continuous and unbroken. Thus when the permanent seal is broken with this modified form of double bag structure, the material can be removed and the reseal means 29 pressed together in the manner hereinbefore described to form the airtight seal. In such a modified structure, the unbroken neck portion of the outer bag may, if desired, be adhesively secured to the inner bag at a point forward of the positioning of the reseal means to the inner bag or liner.

Reference is now to be had to Fig. 7 wherein another form of neck portion made in accordance with the present invention and generally designated by reference numeral 30 is shown in fragmentary form. This neck portion may be used with any type of bag structure desired. This modified formof neck portion 30 will be found to be of particular utility with bags in which granular or like pulverulent material may be packaged which may come into contact with the pressure-sensitive surface thereby tending to prevent a completely tight seal, or with materials that may be affected by contact with the adhesive mass.

The neck portion 30 has a lower neck portion 31 and an upper neck portion 32 which are secured to one another in spaced relation by means of a reseal means 33 in the form of a pressure-sensitive tape in the same man ner as illustrated and described hereinbefore in connection with the bag structure of Fig. 4. The lower portion 3 1, as shown, is provided withan inwardlyextending integral tab portion 34 extending completely around the peripherythereo'fand is foldable with respect thereto. With a bag using the form of neck structure 30, the foldable tab portion 34 will possess a width substantially identical with the width of the exposed adhesive surface of the reseal means 33, and will be folded forwardly in the manner shown in dotted lines to cover the adhesive surface and substantially abut the free end of the upper neck portion 32. This construction provides a completely smooth internal surface for the bag during filling thereof as well as providing the same when removal of'same is accomplished by the purchaser. The upper portions 32 of the neck portion 30 are sealed to one another to form a permanent seal 35 by means 'of crimping and adhesively securing the ends to one another, or any other desired permanent sealing means may be employed equally as well.

When a purchaser opens the bag by breaking the permanent seal to obtain access to the contents, the tabs 34 will be in a flat state covering the exposed pressuresensitive surface, thereby enabling the material to be discharged from the bag without contacting the pressuresenstive mass. To reseal the bag to protect the remaining portion of the contents, the tab portion 34 is then folded downwardly over the lower neck portion 31, as shown in unbroken lines in Fig. 7, and the neck portion 30 pressed flat bringing the pressure-sensitive surface of the reseal means 33 into engagement with itself in the manner shown in Fig. 5 to produce a tightly sealed pack age which will maintain the remaining contents of the package in its original state.

Reference is now to be had to Figs. 8 and 9 wherein another form of a neck construction made in accordance with the present invent-ion and generally designated by reference numeral 36 is shown. The neck construction is another modification which will be found to be of utility with bags containing material which should not come into contact with the pressure-sensitive adhesive mass. The neck portion 36 comprises a lower neck portion 37 and an upper neck portion 38 which are secured to one another in spaced relationship by reseal means 39. The reseal means 39 is in the form of a pressuresensitive tape of the type hereinbefore described, and is applied to the spaced lower and upper portions 37 and 38 of the neck 36 in the same manner dmcribed hereinbefore with other forms of bag structures made in accordance with the present invention. However, the reseal means 34 will be of a width greater than that normally employed since the reseal means will be folded to bring the pressure-sensitive surface into engagement with itself to keep it from coming into contact with the material in the bag.

As shown in Fig. 8, the reseal means 39 is reversely folded along a medial fold line to draw the pressuresensit-ive surface not in contact with the neck portions 37 and 38 into engagement with itself. This operation will draw the free ends of the lower and upper neck portions '37 and 38 into abutting relationship around the complete internal periphery of the neck portion. The resem means 39 in a folded state is folded back complet'ely around the periphery of the neck portion to engage the out'side surface thereof in a flat state. This neck construction 36 will enable material to be placed into the hag and discharged therefrom without coming into contact with the pressure-sensitive sunface of the reseal means '39, and is an alternative form of bag construction from that shown in Fig. 7. The upper ends of the upper neck portion 38 are provided with a permanent seal 40 of any suitable type hereinbefore described and, as shown, may have the ends folded and adhesively secured toclose the bag.

A purchaser to obtain material packaged in a bag made having the neck portion 36 will break the permanent seal 40 and remove the desired amount of material without fear of any material coming into contact with the pressure-sensitive surface. To reseal the bag, the remaining part of the upper portion 38 and the lower portion 37 are pulled in opposite directions with a snap action causing the folded reseal means 39 to come into an erect state with a separation of the pressure-sensitive surface, as shown in Fig. 9. A continued pulling apart of the neck portions 37 and 38 results in the reseal means 39 being placed in a flat state with its pressuresensitive face extending completely around the internal periphery of the bag. The reseal means 39 is pressed into a flat state between the thumb and forefinger of each hand, which will result in the complete sealing of the bag in the manner shown in the form of the invention of Fig. 5.

When material is desired to be taken subsequently from the bag having the neck portion 36 rescaled with the reseal means 39 just described, the upper part of the neck portion 36 remaining after the permanent seal was broken and functioning as tab means, is pulled apart around the periphery of the bag, forcing the pressurese'nsitive surface of the reseal means 39 to separate, thus opening the bag. The reseal means 39 are folded along the medial line in the manner it existed in the original package with the pressure-sensitive surface engaging itself, thereby sealing it from contact with the contents of the bag. The material is then taken from the bag. If further storage of material is necessary, the reseal means 39 are snapped apart from its folded state and sealed against one another in the manner hereinbefore described to again reseal the bag in an airtight state.

Reference is now to be had to Fig. 10 wherein still another form of reseal means is shown which eliminate contact of the material contained in the bag with the prcssuresensitive surface of the reseal means. In this illustrative form of the invention, the neck portion, generally designated by reference numeral 41, comprises a lower neck portion 42 and an upper neck portion 43, 'which are secured to one another in spaced relationship by reseal means 44 in the form of a pressure-sensitive tape and in the same manner as hereinbcfore described with other forms of bags made in accordance with the present invention. The entire pressure-sensitive surface of the reseal means 44 spanning the distance between the spaced ends of the upper and lower neck portions is provided with a removable protective film 45 which serves the fuction of protecting the pressure-sensitive surface from coming into contact with any material contained within the bag. The free end of the upper portion 43 of the neck portion 44 is provided with a permanent seal 46 which is shown in the form of a folded end 'adhesively secured to itself, although, as hereinbefore indicated, other forms of permanent seal means can be employed equally as well. The removable film 45 will remain in place during the filling and subsequent sealing of the bag.

When a purchaser desires to use the contents of the bag utilizing the neck portion 41 and then reseal same to store the remaining contents, the permanent seal 46 is broken and the desired amount of material removed from the bag. To reseal the bag, the removable film 45 is removed from the pressure-sensitive surface of the reseal means 44 and discarded. The pressure-sensitive surface of the reseal means 44 is pressed into tight engagement with itself in the same manner hereinbefore described to produce a sealed, airtight bag in the manner as shown in the form of the invention illustrated in Fig. 5.

Reference is now to be had to Fig. 11 wherein a perspective diagrammatic view of one form of apparatus made in accordance with the present invention and "generally designated by reference letter A is shown. Ap-

paratus A is particularly adapted for use in producing a resealable structure on the paper prior to its formation into bags or like receptacles. The particular embodiment A will be found to be of particular utility with bread wrapping machines, such as those manufactured by American Foundry and Machine Company.

The apparatus A comprises a mounting or paper roll B which will contain the paper C or similar material from which the bag or other container is to be made. The paper C is continuously fed or unrolled from the mounting roll B and passes between a top guide roll D and a bottom guide roll E which are in opposed spaced relation with respect to one another. The bottom roll E is provided with cutter wheels F which are designed to continuously cut a spaced slot G in the paper C by severing a narrow strip therefrom. A rotatable take-up spool K is positioned above the guide rolls D and E to receive and retain the strip H as it is cut from the paper C. If desired, the take-up spool K may be positioned beneath the guide rolls D and E.

The paper C having the slot G formed therein con.- tinues forward and is engaged on opposite sides by a top idler roll L on the top side and a pair of idler rolls M on the under side thereof. A rotatable tape spool N having pressure-sensitive tape carried thereon in a wound state is positioned beneath the pair of idler rolls M, with the pressure-sensitive tape 0 being fed therebetween for engagement with the paper C. As the pressure-sensitive tape 0 comes into contact with the paper C, the pressure-sensitive tape will engage the paper and span the slot G, thereby connecting the ends of the paper formed by the slot to one another and rendering the paper C an integral unit. It will be found advantageous to have the top idler roll L at the point the slot G of the paper C passes thereunder for engagement with the pressure-sensitive tape 0 provided with a concave well around its entire periphery. This will prevent the tape from sticking to the idler roll L. The paper C having the pressure-sensitive tape 0 applied thereon and spanning the slot G is then passed into the bag forming or wrapping machine (not shown) where the bag or wrapper is formed. The apparatus A just described may be positioned between the feed roll B and the machine proper and constitutes an attachment therefor.

An advantage of the present apparatus A is that it requires no positive motive means for operating same. In most wrapping and bag forming machines, the paper C is positively drawn from the feed roll by the wrapping or bag making machine, and as it passes over the guide rolls D and E, the cutter blades F will be rotated thereby causing the strip H to be removed therefrom. The pressure-sensitive tape 0 once in engagement with the paper C and spanning the formed slot G will be continuously withdrawn from the spool N as the paper is pulled into the machine. However, it is to be understood that if the wrapping machine does not employ a positive motive power for withdrawing the paper from the carrying roll, an electric motor or similar motive power may be mounted to drive the idler roll E carrying the cutter wheels F as well as driving the idler rolls M in the application of the pressure-sensitive tape 0 to the paper.

Referring now to Fig. 12, another form of apparatus generally designated by reference letter P is shown. The apparatus P is designed for use with a continuously fed roll of bag or wrapping paper which has ben pre-slotted and is primarily concerned with the application of the pressure-sensitive tape to span the slot prior to passing the paper into the bag making or wrapping machine. This type of machine will be found to be of particular utility in producing the form of bag shown in Fig. in which a removable strip is present over the pressuresensitive adhesive to protect same or to prevent same from coming into contact with the material present in th bag.

The apparatus P comprises a tape roll Q on which the 16 I a tape R is carried in a wound state with the center portion thereof which will span the pre-formed slot in the paper either having an uncovered pressure-sensitive adhesive thereon or a pressure-sensitive surface with a protective removable strip thereover. The remaining side edges of the tape R will possess no adhesive surface. Positioned forward of the tape roll Q is a mounting roll S on which the slotted paper T is carried and fed therefrom. Positioned between the tape roll Q and mounting roll S is an adhesive applicator W which is so located as to apply a thin strip of adhesive continuously on either side of the slot formed in the paper T. The tape R is fed from the tape roll Q and engages the top of the slotted paper T with the pressure-sensitive adhesive portion spanning the width of the slot, with each side edge of the tape R coming into contact with the sides of the paper immediately adjacent each slot to which the adhesive has been applied and becoming adhesively secured thereto. A pressure roller U is positioned at the joining point of the tape R and the paper T to positively insure the bonding of the tape to the paper. The paper T then passes beneath an idler roll V and hence into the bag making or wrapping machine (not shown).

It should be understood that in the apparatus P just described, if the paper is not pre-slotted a cutter wheel may be positioned beneath the roll S carrying the paper T immediately before the paper comes into contact with the adhesive applicator W. If the cutter is included in this apparatus, a take-up roll will be employed to remove the strip of paper cut therefrom.

Reference is now to be had to Fig. 13 wherein another form of apparatus made in accordance with the present invention and generally designated by reference letter A is diagrammatically shown. The apparatus A includes a tape roll B on which pressure-sensitive tape C is carried for withdraw-a1 therefrom. Positioned forward of the tape roll B is a mounting roll D on which the large roll of paper E is carried from which the bag or wrapper will be continuously made. A stationary cutter F is positioned on the side adjacent the tape roll Q for engagement with the surface of the paper E before being withdrawn from the roll. :The cutter F functions to form the slot in the paper E before coming into contact with the pressure-sensitive tape C. A pair of feed rollers G are positioned beneath the large roll D to carry off the strip of paper removed from the roll to form the slot during its rotation.

The pressure-sensitive tape C is fed from the tape roll B into contact with the paper E at the top of the roll D. The pressure-sensitive tape will span the slot in the paper in the manner hereinbefore defined with other modifications. To positively insure a proper bonding of the pressure-sensitive tape to the paper E, a tension or pressure regulating roll H is positioned on top of the roll D at the jointure point of the tape C and paper E. The paper E having the pressure-sensitive tape applied thereto then passes beneath an idler roll K and hence into the wrapping or bag forming machine.

Reference is now to be had to another form of package made in accordance with the present invention which will be found to be of particular utility with food items in which a box and a liner bag containing the items are employed to form the package. Such a package is now in use for packaging saltines, cookies, crackerjack, and like edible products. For example, the present practice of marketing saltines, in an effort to preserve the freshness of the crackers, is to use two or four separate wax paper liners or bags, each of which will contain the same number of crackers, and to place them in a sealed cardboard or like box. In this way, one bag can be removed from the box or carton and used without impairing the freshness of the remaining bags. This is disadvantageous in view of the increased cost of materials as well as increased cost of labor operations.

As illustrated in Fig. 14, the form of package made in accordance with the present invention and generally designated by reference numeral 47 comprises an outer box'or carton 48, which has a main body portion 49 and opposed end portions consisting of a pair of side wings :50 and top and bottom wings 51. To close the outer box 48, the side wings 50 are folded inwardly and the top and bottom wings are folded in overlapping relationship therewith and adhesively secured to one another. This operation functions to permanently seal the carton. An inner wrapper or bag 52 is positioned snugly within the outer box 48 which is to receive the bag containing two separate columns of saltines in stacked relationship therein, or may, if desired, be of a size to receive a bag containing four separate columns of stacked saltines. The inner bag 52 is conventional in design and includes a neck portion 53 which is slotted completely around its periphery resulting in a separation of the neck portion with the s'paced parts thereof being connected to one another in spaced relationship by the reseal means 54. The reseal means 54 is in the form of a pressure-sensitive tape and is applied completely around the periphery of the bag '52 in the same manner as it is applied in other forms of the invention hereinbefore described.

When a purchaser of a box of saltines packaged in the manner just described desires access thereto, the purchaser breaks open the end of the outer box 48 by pulling the top and bottom wing members 51 from one another and swinging the side wing portions 50 outwardly, thus breaking the permanent seal. The inner bag 52 is then removed partway from the carton 48 and the reseal means 54 are pulled apart by means of the upper neck portion functioning as tab means, and the desired number of crackers withdrawn. The inner bag 52 is then rescaled by pulling the reseal means 54 into a flat state and applying pressure with the thumb and forefinger of each hand against opposite sides of the reseal means 54 in the manner hereinbefore described with other forms of the invention. This results in a completely airtight closing of the inner bag, thus preserving the freshness of the crackers at all times without requiring separate bags in one box.

Reference is now to be had to Figs. 15 and 16 wherein another form of package or receptacle made in accordance with the present invention and generally designated byrefercnce numeral 55 is shown. The receptacle 55 is of particular utility in packaging and storing liquid prodnets, such as, for example, milk, orange juice, and like .materials. The package 55 includes a base 56, a pair of side members 57 extending upwardly from each side of the base and in inclined relationship therewith. Triangular end portions 58 are secured at one end to the base 56 and extend upwardly therefrom uniting the sides 57 to one another. The ends 58 are provided with a crease line, thereby giving the sides 57 a small accordion action enabling the sides 57 to be spread apart. Triangular top portions 59 are integrally secured to the top end of each side-S7 to provide a resealable end closure for the receptacle.

The inner top edge of each of the sides 57 is provided with an adhesive film 60 extending thereacross to enable the side members 57 to be permanently sealed in tight relationship to one another by means of heat or the like at the jointure point of the triangular top portions 59. Each of the triangular top portions is provided with continuous slots along each angled side and meeting at their apex, resulting in a continuous tab portion which is united to the remaining part of each top portion by reseal means 61. The reseal means is in the form of pressure-sensitive tape applied to each of the top portions 59 in the same manner as hereinbefore described, with the pressure-sensitive surface of each of thercseal means 61 lying in complementary opposed relationship with respect to one another. The resealable scal means 61 will extend upwardly along each-side edge of each top .portion 59 from each end of the permanent" seal means 69.

When a liquid such as, for example, milk, is packaged in the package 55, the'side edges 57 are sealed to one another along their top edges by the heat scalable adhesive means 60 and will function as a permanent seal there for. The reseal means 61 on each of the top portions 59 are pressed into tight engagement with one another, providing an additional resealable seal. A purchaser, to obtain the liquid from the container 55, first pulls the resealable seal means 61 apart from one another by means of the tabs 61 which are not in adhesive engagement with one another, and then by further pulling, will break the permanent seal 60. The triangular portions 59 may then be folded inwardly as shown in Fig. 18, and the desired amount of fluid poured from the container without fear of the fluid coming into contact with the reseal means 61, or the triangular portions 58 may be folded outwardly and the fluid poured from the receptacle 55. The container may then be rescaled by placing each top portion 59 in opposed relationship with the reseal means 61 of .each top portion being in opposed engagement with one another, and by hand pressure with the thumb and forefinger of each hand along the reseal means 61, the container 55 is closed and rescaled tightly and in an airtight and liquid-tight state.

Reference is now to be had to Fig. 17 wherein still another form of a receptacle made in accordance with the present invention and generally designated by reference numeral 62 is shown. Receptacle 62 will be found to be of particular utility for use with liquids, although it will function satisfactorily regardless of its contents.

The receptacle 62 comprises a transparent main body portion 63 made of plastic or similar transparent and flexible material such as, for example, polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, etc. The main body portion 63 includes opposed side portions 64 connected to one another along their bottom edges and extending upwardly therefrom in outwardly bowed or arcuate relationship with respect to one another. The side edges of each side portion 64 are connected .to one another by opposed end portions 65 which are quite flexible, thereby imparting an accordion action thereto to permit the side portions 64 to be expanded when necessary.

The inner top edges of the side portions 64 are provided with an adhesive film or band extending thereacross to enable the top edges to be adhesively secured to one another to form a permanent seal 66 for the receptacle 63. Triangular top portions 67 are integrally secured to the top edges of the side portions 64. Each of the triangular top portions 67 is provided with continuous slots along-each angled side which meet at their .apex, resulting in a continuous tab portion on each top portion whichis united to the remaining part of the top portion by reseal means 68. The reseal means 68 is in the form of a prcssure-sensitivetapc applied to each of the top portions 67 in the same manner as hereinbefore described with the form of the invention illustrated in Figs. l5 and 16,with the pressure-sensitive surface of each of the reseal means 68 lying in complementary opposed relationship with respect to oneanother. The reseal means .68 will extend upwardly along each side edge of each top portion 67 from each end of the permanent seal 66.

The use of this package is quite similar to that operation hereinbefore described for the embodimentshown in Figs. 15 and 16. ,In general, .the reseal means 61 are separated :by pulling on the tab portions of the top portions 67, and the permanent seal then is broken by further pulling. in this fomr of the invention, when a liquid constitutes the contents, it is preferred to fold the top portions 67 outwardly against the outside face of the body portions 64.

In connection with the illustrative embodiment shown in Fig. l7, the bag 62 may be modified, particularly if materials other than liquids are used therein. In this modification, the top portions 67 will .be eliminated leavinga transparent flexible bag having a straight top edge. The permanent seal 60 will be eliminated and reseal means will be substituted therefor in the following manner. Each top portion of the body portion adjacent the top edge thereof will be slotted, forming a peripherally extending continuous slot around the bag and resulting in a tab portion spaced from the remainder of each body portion. The continuous tab portion will be connected to the body portions by reseal means in the form of a pressure-sensitive tape applied therearound, with the adhesive surface thereof lying on the inside of the bag in the same manner as hereinbefore described with other forms of the invention.

In using this modification of the bag, to obtain access thereinto the tab portions extending around the periphery of the bag in non-sealed engagement and spaced from the reseal means is pulled apart breaking the pressuresensitive seal. This opens the bag and the article, or a portion thereof, may be taken therefrom. The bag is resealed by bringing the pressure-sensitive surfaces of the reseal means into engagement with itself and by pressing thereon forms an airtight, watertight bag. This bag will be of particular utility in marketing and displaying metal articles which have a tendency to tarnish due .to air, as well as becoming scratched and otherwise marred by handling by potential customers. For example, an aluminum utensil may be offered for sale in the resealable bag just described. In this form of package, the article will not become tarnished nor will the surface thereof become scratched or marred by handling. Yet a salesman can open the bag to permit a customer to examine the article more closely. The article after examination is replaced in the .bag which is resealed, thereby maintaining the finish of the article in its original state.

Reference is now to be had to Figs. l8, l9, and 20 wherein another form of package made in accordance with the present invention and generally designated by reference numeral 69 is shown. The bag 69 is another form of bag that will be found to be of particular utility for packaging material whose contents may .deleteriously affect the adhesive characteristics of the resealing means and vice versa.

The bag 69 has opposed main body portions 70 Which are connected to one another along their bottom ends, or may be connected to a base. The body portions 70 are connected to one another along their respective side edges by means of end portion 76m which will preferably be constructed to impart an accordion action to enable the body portions 70 to be expanded. I

A neck portion 71 (see Figs. 19 and 20) is secured to the top edge of each of the body portions 70 in spaced relationship by sealing means 72. The sealing means 72 is in the form of a pressure-sensitive tape which extends completely around the periphery of the bag. The sealing means 72 is applied to the bag such that when the bag is in an opened form, as shown in Fig. 20, the pressure-sensitive surface will be facing to the outside of the bag proper, thereby providing a non-tacky smooth surface around the inner periphery of the neck portion of the bag.

The body portions 70 are provided with a fold line extending completely around the periphery of the bag at a point spaced downwardly from the reseal means 72' This enables the neck portion and a portion of the body member 70- to be reversely folded within the bag 69 in the manner shown in Fig. 19. This operation will result in the pressure-sensitive surfaces of the reseal means 72 coming into alignment with itself thereby sealing the package in an airtight state in the manner shown in Fig. 19. A permanent seal 73 is positioned around the periphery of the bag completely encasing or sealing the bag 69 along the peripherally extending fold line, thereby forming a completely separate permanent seal, as,

shown in Figs. 18 and 19. The permanent seal may be provided with a tear string 74 to facilitate the opening of the package. It is to be understood that other forms '14 of permanent sealing means, such as those hereinbefof described, may be employed equally as well as the illustrative embodiment just described.

When the package 69 is to be sealed by the manufacturer or packer, the neck portion 71 is in the extended state in the form shown in Fig. 20, and the material may be placed therein without fear of it coming into contact with the pressure-sensitive surface of the reseal means 72. The neck portions 71 and part of the body portions 70 are folded inwardly along the fold line after the bag is filled, bringing the pressure-sensitive surface of the reseal means 72 into engagement with itself, and a slight pressure thereon will result in a tight sealing of the bag in the manner shown in Fig. 19. The permanent seal 73 with the tear string 74 is then applied along the fold line extending around the complete periphery of the neck to completely seal the package in the manner shown in Figs. 18 and 19.

A purchaser of material packaged in the package 69 will open the bag by pulling on the drawstring 74 to break the permanent seal. The purchaser takes the tab portions formed by the body portions which are folded into the bag, and which are in .a nonsealed state, and pulls same apart to break the seal means 72. The neck portion 71 is folded outwardly along the fold line of the body portions 70 in the manner shown in Fig. 20, with the pressure-sensitive surface of the seal means 72 facing outwardly of the bag 69. The desired quantity of material is removed from the bag and it is resealed by folding the neck portion 71 back into the bag along the fold line of the body portions 70 and pressing the pressuresensitive surface of the reseal means 72 into engagement with itself to form a tightly sealed bag.

Reference is now to be had to Fig. 21 wherein a particular form of seal means and edge construction for association to provide a tight resealing is shown in a fragmentary exploded view. The fragmentary resealable section of a neck portion of a bag, generally designated by reference numeral 75, comprises a lower neck portion 76 and an upper neck portion 77 which are in spaced relationship with respect to one another, and are secured to one another in spaced relation by reseal means 78. The reseal means 78 is in the form of a pressure-sensitive tape, with the pressure-sensitive surface thereof engaging the free ends of the lower and upper neck portions 76 and 77, respectively. Each free end of the respective upper and lower portions is provided with serrated edges 79 and 80, respectively, which will extend completely around the periphery of the bag. The apex point of each serration will lie in opposed relationship to the corresponding apex point producing a symmetrical diamond configuration. The advantage of the serrated edges is that a narrow width of pressure-sensitive tape serving as the reseal means 78 can be employed without impairing the sealing action of the reseal means 72 when placed in a sealed state in the manner hereinbefore described. In the forms of the invention hereinbefore described, the spaced edges united by the reseal means have been straight and in parallel relationship to one another. It is to be understood that the serrated construction shown in Fig. 21 can be used equally as well in each form.

Reference is now to be had to Fig. 22 wherein a modification of the serrated edges shown in Fig. 21 is illustrated. In the modification shown in Fig. 22, the lower and upper neck portions 76 and 77 will be provided with serrated edges 79 and 80 and will be secured to one another in spaced relation by the reseal means 78. However, instead of having the apex point of each serration along each of the serrated edges 79 and 80 being in opposed relationship, such apex point will be in staggered relationship, producing a zigzag effect. This modification can be used equally as well in any of the other forms of the invention hereinbefore described to the same effect as the form shown in Fig. 21.

Reference is now to be had to Fig. 23 wherein another form of apparatus designated by reference letter A" is shown. The apparatus A" comprises a main roll B" on which a large roll of paper C" is carried for unwinding therefrom. The paper C" is withdrawn from the large roll B" and passes down to and around the idler roll D" and hence up and over and around a second idler roll E" spaced above and forward the first idler roll D". The paper C" passes down under and around a third idler roll F", with cutter means G" being positioned in engagement therewith to contact and cut a slot in the paper as it passes thereagainst. The strip of paper H" removed from the paper roll by the action of the cutter means G falls downwardly into a refuse receptacle (not shown), or may be rewound on a take-up spool. The paper C having the slot formed therein passes from the roll F" upwardly and over a fourth idler roll K". A tape roll L" carrying pressure-sensitive tape M is mounted above the fourth idler roll K" with the tape M being fed therefrom and in engagement with the tension rollers N to be secured onto the paper C and span the formed slot therein. The paper C" carrying the tape M" adhesively secured thereto passes downwardly and beneath a powered drive roller 0" and then up and over rollers P" which are connected to one another and to a clutch roller Q" which serves to maintain a proper tension on the paper. The paper C passes from the rollers P" down and around a large idler roll R" and hence into the packing or wrapping machine.

The apparatus A" will be mounted between the large paper carrying roll and the wrapping or bag making machine proper, and will be of particular utility where a smooth even tension is required, particularly after the reseal means have been applied to the paper. This illustrative apparatus A" will be found particularly suited for use with bread wnapping machines of the type hereinbefore described.

Reference is now to be had to Fig. 24 wherein another form of apparatus generally designated by reference letter A" is shown wherein a positive even tension on the paper as it passes into the wrapping or bag making machine is required. The apparatus A'" will be disposed between the large roll carrying the paper or like material from which the bag or wrapper is to be made and the wrapping or bag making machine proper. The apparatus A' comprises a top slotting roll B" and a bottom opposed slitting roll 0" through which the paper D passes as it is withdrawn from the roll. A cutting blade 13'' is mounted on the slitting roll C for slitting the paper as it passes therethrough forming the desired spaced slots. The paper D'" after the slot is formed therein passes downwardly into engagement with a taping roller F" which is in spaced ertical alignment with the rollers B and C'". Pressuresensitive tape 6 is fed from a roller (not shown) to engage the paper 13" and span the slot formed therein. A spring tension roller H is in opposed engagement with the taping roller F at the jointure point of the tape and the paper to positively insure a tight bond therebetween. The paper passes in engagement with and over and under a powered roller 14 which is continuously rotated by any suitable power means. The paper is then fed over a floating clutch roller L' mounted for diagonal movement in a slotted roll M" and hence over a guide roller N' and into the wrapping or bag making machine. The floating clutch roller L" is provided to positively insure a proper tensioning on the paper. Any sudden pull on the paper as it is being drawn into the wrapping or bag making machine raises the clutch roller and causes friction on the paper. When the tension is released, the roller drops down and lessons the pressure, thereby insuring a positive and continuous uniform tension on the paper when it passes from the machine.

The several forms of the invention shown and described herein are illustrative in character only, and in no way represent all forms of packages and bags possible under the present invention. Moreover, the goods that have been listed hereinbefore as suitable for packaging in accordance with the present invention are illustrative in character, since there are a great many additional items that are readily apparent that can be packaged in accordance with the present invention.

In illustrating the present invention, certain of the specific embodiments described as made in accordance with the present invention have stated specific articles that are present therein. Accordingly, it is to be undershood the present invention not only encompasses the bags, receptacles, containers, packages per se, but also the special packages including items therein which are produced from packaging in accordance with the present invention.

In producing the resealable packages of the present invention, it is generally preferred for many reasons to employ pressure-sensitive tape as the reseal means. However, it is to be understood that it is within the scope of the present invention that in certain instances it may be desirable to apply a pressure-sensitive film directly to the inner periphery of the bag with no slot formed therein and no tape being used. When this method is employed, care should be taken to insure the position of the adhesive film around the inner periphery of the bag at a point well below the top edge thereof so that a non-sealed tape portion will be present. This makes it easy to open and reseal the bag properly.

While there have been described herein what are at present considered preferred embodiments of the invention, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that modifications and changes may be made therein without departing from the essence of the invention. It is therefore to be understood that the exemplary embodiments are illustrative and not restrictive of the invention, the scope of which is defined in the appended claims, and that all modifications that come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are intended to be included therein.

I claim:

1. A bread package comprising a body wrapper, bread encased by said wrapper portion, said body wrapper being sealed at both ends thereof, said body wrapper having a slot extending completely therearound adjacent one closed end thereof separating said body wrapper into two portions spaced from one another, a pressure-sensitive resealable tape extending completely around the body wrapper along the slot to span same and unite the two portions thereof in spaced relation, the pressure-sensitive surface lying on the inside face of said body wrapper.

2. A collapsible bag comprising a body portion having entrance into the bag at one end thereof, said body portion being slotted completely around its periphery adjacent the open end, a pressure-sensitive tape extending completely around the periphery of the body portion spanning the peripherally extending slot and uniting the spaced portion of the body portion to one another, the pressure-sensitive surface of said tape lying on the inside face of the body portion and removable, normally permanent seal means at the open end of the bag.

3. A bag construction comprising an inner bag, an outer bag enveloping said inner bag, each of said bags having a top portion, each top portion of each bag having a slot extending completely around the periphery thereof, the slot in said outer bag being in complementary relationship with the slot in the inner bag, with the slot in the outer bag being of a width greater than the width of the slot of the inner bag, said slots separating the top portion of each bag into two parts, a pressure-sensitive resealable tape extending around the slot in the outer bag and spanning same and connectingthe two parts of the top portion to one another, the free ends of the spaced parts of the inner bag being in complete engagement with the pressure-sensitive surface of said tape, and permanent seal means provided around, the open end of said bag and spaced from said pressure-sensitive tape to permanently seal the bag.

4. A collapsible bag comprising a body portion having one end capable of being opened, a slot extending completely around the periphery of said body portion adjacent one said end thereof separating said body portion into two parts thereof, pressure-sensitive resealable tape positioned around said body portion along said slot to span same and unite the two parts in spaced relationship, said pressure-sensitive tape being reversely foldable upon itself circumferentially to bring the pressure-sensitive surface into sealing engagement with itself and to draw the spaced ends of said spaced parts into abutting relationship, said pressure sensitive tape in a reversely folded state being folded flat against the outside surface of said body portion, the spaced part of said bo'dy portion adjacent the open end thereof providing a tab portion for said bag.

5. A collapsible bag comprising a body portion having one end capable of being opened, a slot extending completely around the periphery of said body portion adjacent one said end thereof separating said body portion into two parts thereof, pressure-sensitive resealable tape positioned around said body portion along said slot to span same and unite the two parts in spaced relationship the pressure-sensitive surface of said tape lying inwardly of said body portio'n, a removable strip covering said pressure-sensitive surface, the spaced part of said body portion adjacent the open end thereof providing a tab portion for said bag.

6. A collapsible bag comprising a body portion having one end capable of being opened, a slot extending completely around the periphery of said body portion adjacent one said end thereof separating said body portion into two parts thereof, pressure-sensitive resealable tape positioned around said body portion along said slot to span same and unite the two parts in spaced relationship the pressure-sensitive surface of said tape lying inwardly of said body portion, the free ends of said spaced parts being serrated completely therearound to provide spaced serrated edges, the spaced part of said body po'rtion adjacent the open end thereof providing a tab portion for said bag.

7. A bag comprising a body portion, a top portion integrally secured to said body portion and having one end open, a slot extending completely around said top portion adjacent the open end thereof separating the top portion into two spaced parts, pressure-sensitive tape extending around the inner periphery of the bag to span the slot formed therein and unite the separate parts 18 thereof in spaced relationship, the pressure-sensitive surface of said tape means facing the outside of said top portion, said top portion being foldable-inwardly along its jo'inture line with said body portion to bring the pressure-sensitive surface of said tape into alignment with itself around the complete inner periphery of the bag.

8. A bag in accordance with claim 7 wherein permanent seal means are provided along the jointure point of said top portion and said bottom portio'n.

9. A bag comprising a body portion having one end capable of being opened, a peripheral slot formed by peripherally cutting said body portion and folding against one part of said body portion a peripheral flap, said slot separating said body portion into two parts thereof, pressure-sensitive resealable tape positioned around said body po'rtion along said slot to span same and unite the two parts in spaced relationship, and said peripheral flap selectively covering exposed pressure-sensitive portions of said tape.

10. A container comprising a body portion, said body portion being peripherally slotted at a point spaced from one end thereof, and pressure-sensitive tape means spanning the formed slot and uniting the spaced parts of said body portion to one another, a pressure-sensitive surface of said tape being registerable inwardly of said container for sealing adherence to itself.

11. A container in accordance with claim 10, wherein the body portion has a removable, normally permanent seal means at one end thereof spaced from the pressuresensitive means.

12. A package constructed in accordance with claim 10, wherein edible material is positioned within said body portion.

13. A package constructed in accordance with claim 10, wherein inedible material is positioned within said body portion.

14. A package constructed in accordance with claim 10, wherein a liquid is positioned Within said body portion.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,992,152 Yeates Feb. 19, 1935 2,046,975 Shaw et al. July 7, 1936 2,272,407 Heckman Feb. 10, 1942 2,475,236 Gollub July 5, 1949 2,476,564 Rosen July 19, 1949 2,502,635 Swartz Apr. 4, 1950 2,675,746 Conti Apr. 20, 1954 FOREIGN PATENTS 393,199 Great Britain June 1, 1933

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3028795 *Oct 6, 1959Apr 10, 1962Hughes William LCutting and sealing apparatus
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Classifications
U.S. Classification426/128, 493/212, 426/123, 229/87.5, 229/87.9, 383/95, 383/211, 383/210.1
International ClassificationB65D33/16, B65D75/04, B65D75/08, B65D75/52, B65D75/12, B65D75/58, B65D75/68
Cooperative ClassificationB65D75/12, B65D75/58, B65D75/5855, B65D33/16, B65D75/08, B65D2575/586, B65D75/68, B65D75/5805
European ClassificationB65D75/58, B65D75/68, B65D33/16, B65D75/58F, B65D75/58B