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Publication numberUS2950040 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 23, 1960
Filing dateOct 1, 1959
Priority dateOct 1, 1959
Publication numberUS 2950040 A, US 2950040A, US-A-2950040, US2950040 A, US2950040A
InventorsBolding Hubert V
Original AssigneeStandard Packaging Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carton having simulated band
US 2950040 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 23, 1960 H. v. BOLDING CARTON HAVING SIMULATED BAND Filed 001:. 1, 1959 INVENTOR. HUBERT V. BOLDING A T TORNEYS.

United States atcnt O CARTON HAVING SIMULATED BAND Hubert V. Balding, Clarksvilie, Ind, assignor to Standard Packaging Corporation, New York, N.Y., a corporation of Virginia Filed Oct. 1, 1959, Ser. No. 843,851

3 Claims. (Cl. 229-38) This invention relates to a carton having a simulated band, that is to say, a carton having an identifying band or strip which gives the appearance of surrounding a section of the carton. The present invention is particularly adapted to facilitate the application of attractive and readily removable bands bearing identifying marks, such as advertising matter or trademarks, to fancy or gift cartons whose appearance would be spoiled by applying the identifying marks directly thereon.

There'is a wide demand for gift-packaged products, for example, colored metallic foil cartons make highly attractive gift cartons for a wide variety of products, including bottled whiskeys, particularly during the Christmas season. The product can be gift-packaged before it is supplied to the retailer, or the retailer can be supplied with a quantity of gift cartons so that he can supply the gift-packaged product to the customers who request them. it is apparent that it would detract from the appearance of these gift cartons to print identifying or advertising matter thereon. Furthermore, to do so would defeat the purpose of the gift carton because many customers desire a non-commercial type wrap. However, if all such advertising and identifying matter were to be eliminated, the value of such advertising would be lost to the manufacturer and the convenience of the identification would be unavailable to the retailer.

One possible solution to the problem is to place a removable band bearing the identifying or advertising matter on the cartons. These bands would not appreciably detract from the aesthetic qualities of the carton, and they can be removed by the customer desiring a noncommercial type gift package. Unfortunately, however, it takes a great deal of time and care to place a tightfitting band around a carton without tearing or otherwise damaging either the band or the carton. On the other hand, if a relatively loose-fitting band is used to facilitate the application thereof to the carton, the hand does not present a neat appearance and, as a practical problem, it becomes necessary to secure the band on the carton in the desired position. Obviously, this securernent makes the band more diificult to remove, and if an adhesive is used, it will most certainly mar the beauty of the gift carton after removal of the band or strip.

The object of the present invention is to provide a carton equipped with a simulated band which overcomes the above disadvantages and is readily detached from the carton without detracting whatever from the appearance thereof.

' The foregoing objects are achieved in the present invention by a carton made from a blank cut and scored to form a series of side wall panels spaced side-by-side between score lines and an outer flap on each side of said series of side wall panels. These outer flaps serve as anchorages to which the extreme ends of a strip bearing the desired advertising or identifying matter are aifixed, the intermediate portion of the strip extending from one anchorage to the other across the outer surfaces of all simulated band.

2,950,040 Patented Aug. 23, 1960 of the panels without any attachment therebetween. In constructing the carton, the blank is folded along the score lines and the two outer flaps are folded along their respective fold lines and bent inwardly before being aflixed together in face-to-face relationship to form an internal flange. If the outer flaps are brought together the proper alignment, the strip previously applied to the blank will appear as a band surrounding the carton. This simulated band is readily detached from the carton without leaving noticeable marks because the only points of attachment between the strip and the carton are at the ends of the strip now hidden internally in the carton. Moreover, this hidden internal attachment between the ends of the strip and the internal flaps provides the necessary securement to hold the strip neatly on the carton until the band is to be detached therefrom.

The present invention thus provides a novel and easyto-make carton having a simulated band which is neat, attractive, tight-fitting and readily detached from the carton.

. For a more detailed explanation of the present invention, reference can be made to the detailed description which follows, and to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a carton equipped with a simulated band;

Figure 2 is a face view of the carton in collapsed condition with the end flaps tucked inwardly illustrating the manner in which the banded carton would be supplied for use;

Figure 3 is a sectional view taken along the line 3-3 of Figure 2; and

Figure 4 is a view of the outer face of a blank from which the carton is made, illustrating the manner in which the strip is applied to the blankto produce the Referring to Figure 1 of the drawings, the present invention relates to a carton 19 to which a simulated band 11 is applied. The carton is preferably, but not necessarily,a gift carton of the collapsible and erectable type.

These cartons are supplied to the user in the collapsed nated 12, is made of four panels, 13, 14, 15 and i6,

spaced side-by-side and defined by the parallel score lines 17, 18, 19, 20 and 21. The upper and lower ends of the panels are defined by the score lines 22 and 23, respectively, which extend perpendicular to'the score lines 17 to 21, inclusive. The upper end or cover of the carton is formed by the flaps, generally designated 24-, and the self-erectable bottom or lower end of the carton is formed by the flaps, generally designated 25. Since a carton of this general construction is well known and has been in use for some time, it is considered unnecessary to describe the manner in which the upper and lower ends of the carton are formed, particularly inasmuch as these details are unrelated to the subject matter 'of the invention. 7

The extreme ends of the blank 12 are formed by the 'fiaps 27 and 28 which are connected to their respective able means, such as an .adhesive, to the surface of the flaps 2.7 and 28 adjacent the outer edges of the blank. Thus, the strip extends across the outer surface of the blank without any attachment between the strip and the outer surfaces of the side wall panels. Also, the surfaces of the flaps 27 and 28 immediately adjacent the score lines 17 and 21, respectively, are free of the adhesive or other attachment so that the strip 11 can be detached from the carton along tear lines offset from the score lines 17 and 21 in the direction of the respective outer edges of the blank. To insure that the tear lines will be laterally offset from the respective score lines 17 and 21 in the direction of the outer edges of the blank, the strip can be weakened, such as by perforated lines, to establish the desired location of the tear lines.

The blank is preferably made of cardboard, and if the carton is to be a gift package, the outer surface of the blank is composed of an unmarked lamination of sheet material suitable for a gift package, for example, a colored metallic foil. The strip 11 is a flexible and preferably tearable material having identifying markings thereon. Although a paper strip can be used, in gift cartons having an outer metallic foil lamination, transparent vinyl film or Cellophane strips are less likely to detract from the appearance of the carton. Furthermore, the stretch characteristics of the plastic materials makes them less susceptible to tearing prematurely;

A sinuous line 30 is formed in each of the flaps 27 and 28 to facilitate saturation or seepage of the adhesive beneath the outer surface of the blank. This is helpful in providing better adhesion of the strip to the surface of the flap, particularly if the outer lamination of the blank gives it a highly smooth or metallic-like surface. The marks 31 on the end flaps 27 and 28 .help locate the strip 11 with respect to the blank 12.

The carton is constructed by bending or folding the blank along thescore lines 17, 18, 19, 20 and 21 to form the side walls of the carton. In this instance, there are four panels defining the side walls of the carton and each panel will be positioned in perpendicular relationship with respect to the adjacent panels. The two end flaps 27 and 28 are folded inwardly and the faces thereof corresponding to the outer surface of the .blank are brought into face-to-face relationship :and

aflixed together by adhesive or other suitable means. 'Thus, these flaps form an internal flange within the carton to which the ends of the strip 11 are anchored.

The assembled carton in collapsed condition is shown in Figure 3. The extreme ends of the strip 11 are anchored between the internal flaps 27 and 28 inwardly .of the score lines 17 and 21. Therefore, there is no need for any additional anchorage between the exposed outer surface of the carton and the strip 11. When the carton is erected, the strip will give the appearance of .a band which surrounds the carton, provided that the flaps 27 and 28 are brought together in proper alignment, thus the simulated band can be readily detached from the car-ton without marring the surface thereof.

If the simulated band is a transparent material, it is possible to print thereon and Superimpose onthe outer surface of the carton various colorful designs which .may enhance the appearance of the carton, as well as identify the product packaged. Such simulated bands .are readily torn from the carton along lines offset -inwardly from the outer surface of the carton so as to make the tear lines hidden from the viewer. When the band is detached, the carton provides an attractive noncommercial package which requires no further wrapping whatever.

The application has been described in a single preferred form and by way of example only, and obviously many variations and modifications may be made therein without departing from the spirit of the invention. The invention, therefore, is not to be limited to any specified form or embodiment, except insofar as such tations are expressly set forth in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A carton having a simulated band made from a blank having outer and inner surfaces comprising a. plurality of side wall panels arranged side-by-side and defined by'score lines, a flap joined by a score line to each of the two most remote side wall panels of the blank, and a strip of flexible material having identifying markings thereon, said strip being affixed at both ends to the blank, the intermediate portion of the strip extending across the outer surface of said blank without any attachment between the strip and the outer surfaces of the sidewall panels, the flaps being brought together during the assembly of the carton and bent inwardly along the score lines which connect them to their re spective side wall panels, the faces of the flaps corresponding to the outer surface of the blank being attached in face-to-face relationship with the ends .of the strip in alignment so that the strip will give the appearance of a. band surrounding the outer surfaces of the walls of the carton.

2. A carton as set forth in claim 1 in which the material of the strip is tearable and the ends of the strip are attached to the flaps at points spaced inwardly from the score lines which connect the flaps to their respective side wall panels when the flaps are in face-to-face relationship, whereby the strip can be torn along lines which are not visible to a viewer of the carton, thereby to detach the strip from the carton.

3. A banded gift carton made from a cardboard blank having an outer attractive lamination without commercial markings thereon comprising a plurality of side wall panels arranged side-by-side and defined by score lines, a flap joined by a score line to each of the two most remote side wall panels of the blank, and a transparent strip of flexible, tearable material having identifying markings thereon, said strip being aflixed at oneend to one of said flaps and at the opposite end of the other of said flaps, the point of attachment between .the strip and the end flap being spaced away from the score line which connects the end flap to the adjacent panel, the strip extending across the outer unmarked lamination of the blank without any attachment between the strip and the outer surfaces of the side wall panels, the flaps being brought together during the assembly of the carton and bent inwardly along the score lines which connect them to their respective side wall panels, the faces of the flaps corresponding to the outer surface of the blank being attached in face-to-face relationship with the ends of the strip in alignment so that the strip will give the appearance of a band surrounding the outer surface of the walls of the carton, the visible portion of the strip References Cited in the' file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Ward et al. Mar. 5, 1940 La May June 2, 1942

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2192423 *Nov 12, 1938Mar 5, 1940Bachman Edward ALabel band
US2285212 *Mar 21, 1941Jun 2, 1942Shellmar Products CoDecorative material
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3026014 *May 26, 1960Mar 20, 1962Kvp Sutherland Paper CoCarton
US3257068 *Jul 16, 1964Jun 21, 1966Stitzel Weller DistilleryPrewrapped carton
US3335937 *Sep 15, 1964Aug 15, 1967Diamond Int CorpRemovable identification band for cartons and blank for producing the same
US3335938 *Dec 16, 1965Aug 15, 1967Diamond Int CorpRemovable identification band for cartons and blank for producing the same
US3343750 *Apr 25, 1966Sep 26, 1967Container CorpPrewrapped carton
US3377017 *Jul 17, 1967Apr 9, 1968Arthur M. RosenfieldTapered box with self-locking cover
US3424367 *Apr 10, 1968Jan 28, 1969Container CorpOverwrapped carton
US3445053 *Jan 26, 1966May 20, 1969Container CorpDisplay carton having a film overlap
US3451611 *Jun 10, 1968Jun 24, 1969Finn Ind IncPrewrap carton for high-speed erection
US3459358 *Jan 31, 1968Aug 5, 1969Finn Ind IncPrewrapped gift carton
US3460738 *Feb 28, 1968Aug 12, 1969Finn Ind IncPrewrapped gift carton
US3528598 *May 29, 1969Sep 15, 1970Mead CorpContainer with overwrap
US3534898 *Aug 6, 1968Oct 20, 1970Continental Can CoCarton with removable identification sleeve
US3729126 *Jan 18, 1972Apr 24, 1973Reynolds Metals CoDecorative carton with removable band and blank therefor
US3833164 *Jul 20, 1972Sep 3, 1974Somerville Ind LtdDecorative container
US5024014 *Dec 20, 1989Jun 18, 1991Swierczek Remi DIntegral label and coaster
US5375701 *Oct 19, 1992Dec 27, 1994Oscar Mayer Foods CorporationFood package having a compartmentalized rigid base tray
US5657873 *Dec 23, 1994Aug 19, 1997Kraft Foods, Inc.Food package having a compartmentalized rigid base tray
US5657874 *May 31, 1995Aug 19, 1997Kraft Foods, Inc.Food package having a compartmentalized rigid base tray
US5922376 *Dec 23, 1996Jul 13, 1999Privert; PeterNestable food and beverage package
US6050419 *Jan 20, 1999Apr 18, 2000Kraft Foods, Inc.Pallet wrap and methods for stabilizing and displaying articles
US6085907 *May 11, 1998Jul 11, 2000Institute Of Legal Medicine, University Of BernFoldable cardboard box for contact-free drying and long-term storage of biological evidence recovered on cotton swabs and forensic evidence collection kit including same
US6092664 *Sep 4, 1998Jul 25, 2000Bartosek; PaulFood package including a tray
US6171260Jan 26, 1999Jan 9, 2001Institute Of Legal Medicine, University Of BerneFoldable cardboard box for contact-free drying and long-term storage of biological evidence recovered on cotton swabs and forensic evidence collection kit including same
US8696203 *Oct 14, 2008Apr 15, 2014American Greetings CorpoationGift bags with removable, configurable and wearable parts
US20100092109 *Oct 14, 2008Apr 15, 2010Karen RednourGift bags with removable, configurable and wearable parts
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/118, 40/312
International ClassificationB65D5/42, B65D5/02
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/02, B65D5/4245
European ClassificationB65D5/42E2H, B65D5/02