Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2952984 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 20, 1960
Filing dateJun 23, 1958
Priority dateJun 23, 1958
Also published asDE1122560B
Publication numberUS 2952984 A, US 2952984A, US-A-2952984, US2952984 A, US2952984A
InventorsJr Walton H Marshall
Original AssigneeConch Int Methane Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Processing liquefied natural gas
US 2952984 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

p 1960 w. H. MARSHALL, JR 2,952,984

PROCESSING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS Filed June 23, 1958 A Trap/VH6 2,952,984 PROCESSING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS Walton H. Marshall, Jr., Downings, Va., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Conch International Methane Limited, a corporation of the Bahamas Filed June 23, 1958, 'Ser. No. 743,732 11 'Claims. (Cl. 62-27) This invention relates generally to improvements in the art of distributing and processing natural gas, and more particularly, but not by way of limitation, to an improved method of preparing liquefied natural gas for use as a fuel, or partly for use as a fuel and partly for use as raw material in the petrochemical industry.

As it is well known in the art, some localities have an abundant supply of natural gas, whereas other localities have very little or no natural gas resources. When such localities are reasonably close to one another, the natural gas may be transported from one locality to the other by means of a pipeine. However, when such localities are separated by long distances, or by substantial bodies of water, transportation by pipeline becomes impractical. A new industry is in the stage of development for the pri mary purpose of liquefying natural gas in a locality having an abundant supply and transporting the natural gas in liquefied form to a remote locality having a natural gas shortage. The liquefied natural gas occupies about the space required for natural gas in gaseous form, thereby making transportation over long distances practical. At the remote locality, the liquefied natural gas is revaporized and used as a fuel. In some of these remote localities, the natural gas can be revaporized and used directly as a fuel. In other localities, the gas specifications for existing equipment therein are different from the specifications of the revaporized natural gas, thereby requiring that the rev-aporized natural gas be reformed to a lower heating value and new specific gravity before use.

As it is also known in the art, natural gas usually contains a rather wide range of hydrocarbons. Ordinarily, methane comprises the major proportion of the natural gas, with the heavier hydrocarbons such as ethane, propane, butane and the like being present in the gas in minor proportions. At least some of these heavier hydrocarbons can be separated before the natural gas is liquefied and transported to the remote localities. However, it is sometimes desirable to liquefy the heavier hydrocarbons along with the methane and transport the entire natural gas composition to the remote locality in liquid form. These heavier hydrocarbons have two important uses at the remote localities. Firstly, when the natural gas must be reformed to a lower heating value and new specific gravity to meet existing equipment specifications, the heavier hydrocarbons may be conveniently used in the formation of a carrier gas having a lower heating value and new specific gravity, with the carrier gas being subsequently mixed with methane to form the gaseous fuel having the desired heat content and specific gravity specificaitons. Secondly, the heavier hydrocarbons may be economically used as a raw material in the petrochemical industry in the remote locality.

The present invention contemplates a novel method of separating the methane and heavier hydrocarbons in liquefied natural gas, with a simultaneous revaporization of the methane. The revaporization and separation are accomplished in a fractionating zone in such a manner that a portion of the heat in vapors withdrawn from the fractionating zone may be efiiciently utilized in heating the liquefied natural gas fed to the fractionating zone, and the resulting vapors will be extremely rich in methane, i.e., containing a very minor proportion of the heavier hydrocarbons. Condensate formed in said vapors by passage in heat exchange relation with the liquefied natu- 2,952,984 Patented Sept. 20, 1960 ral gas are refluxed to the fractionating zone to enhance the separation of methane in the fiactionating zone. The present method also contemplates the recovery of work from the separated methane, as well as the utilization of heat from the expanded methane vapors for Warming methane vapors being fed to the work-producing zone, such that the maximum energy of the separated methane may be utilized. The separated heavier hydrocarbons may be used either in forming a carrier gas or as a raw material in the petrochemical industry, as previously indicated.

An important object of this invention is to provide an efficient method of separating methane from a liquefied natural gas with a minimum of equipment and cost.

Another object of this invention is to simultaneously separate methane fromliquefied natural gas and revapon'ze the methane.

A further object of this invention is to provide a novel method of fractionating liquefied natural gas, wherein the overhead from the fractionating zone is utilized to heat the liquefied natural gas being fed to the fractionating zone. I

A still further object of this invention is to recover power in a process of revaporizing liquefied natural gas.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be evident from the following detailed description, when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawing which illustrates this invention.

The single figure of the drawing is a flow diagram illustrating a practice of this invention.

As previously indicated, natural gas ordinarily cornprises a rather wide range of hydrocarbons, and it is desirable that all of the hydrocarbons be liquefied prior to transporting the composition to a remote locality. To illustratethe present invention, it will be assumed that the liquefied naural gas to be separated and revaporized has the following analysis, although it will be understood that this composition is merely an example and. that the invention may be practiced with a liquefied natural gashaving substantially any composition:

Referring to the drawing in detail, reference character 10 designates a line leading from a sourcev (not shown) of the liquefied natural gas, which will ordinarily be a suitable insulated storage tank located in a coastal region where the liquefied natural gas may be received from similar insulated containers mounted aboard a ship used in transporting the gas to the remote locality- The liquefied natural gas is ordinarily stored at. about atmospheric pressure, or slightly above, with a temperature of about 246 F. to 258 F., depending upon the precise composition of the gas. This low pressure and cold liquefied gas is fed to a pump. 12 for pumping the liquefied natural gas through another line 14 to a fractionating tower 16 at increased pressure. It is preferred that the pump 12 provide a substantial increase in the pressure of the liquefied natural gas, with the pressure being raised to about 585 p.s.i.g. to facilitate fractionation and subsequent power recovery, as, will be more fully hereinafter set forth. Also, a pair of heat exchangers 18 and 20 are interposed in the line 14 to. heat the liquefied natural gas being fed to the fractionating tower 16 3 until approximately the bubble point temperature of the liquefied natural gas is reached. In other words, the liquefied natural gas being fed to the tower 16 is pressurized and then heated to approximately its bubble point. The detailed operations of the heat exchangers 18 and 20 are described in detail below.

The fractionating tower 16 may be of any desired con struction which provides a vertically extended fractionating zone. The liquefied natural gas is, fed to the medial portion of the tower 16 and is slightly expanded, as from 585 p.s.i.g. to 535 p.s.i.g. into the tower 16 to facilitate separation of the methane from the heavier hydrocarbons. The liquid accumulating in the lower end portion of the tower 16 is circulated through a re-boilcr 22 for heating the tower to such a temperature that methane enriched vapors will be directed into the upper portion of the tower, and the liquid in the lower portion of the tower will be enriched with the heavier hydrocarbons. In the example used for illustration, the liquid in the lower portion of the tower 16 is heated to a temperature of about 135 F. by the re-boiler 22. The reboiler22 derives its heat from any suitable heating medium, such as a gaseous product from a reforming operation, to maintain the desired temperature of the liquid in the lower portion of the tower 16. The liquid accumulating in the lower portion of the tower 16 is selectively withdrawn through a line 24 to maintain the desired liquid level in the tower. A typical analysis of liquid withdrawn through the line 24 is as follows:

Component: Mol. percent Methane 1.0 Ethane 45.7 Propane 32.1 Isobutaue 7.7 n-Butane 7.9' Isopentane 2.4 n-Pentane 1.2 Benzene 1.2 n-Heptane 0.8

This liquid withdrawn through line'24 will, of course, be at the same pressure as the tower 16 and ata temperature of about 135 F. It is preferred that the liquid be passed through a suitable expansion valve 26 for at least partially vaporizing the liquid and reducing the pressure thereof to a pressure suitable for transportation through a pipeline 28 to the point of use. As previously indicated, these heavier hydrocarbons may be conveniently used in forming a carrier gas by a reforming operation or used as a raw material in a petrochemical industry.

The methane enriched vapors rising to the upper portion of the fractionating tower 16 are withdrawn through a'line 30 and passed through the heat exchanger 18 interposed in the liquefied natural gas feed line 14. A typical analysis of the vapors withdrawn through the line 30 is as follows:

Also, with the temperature and pressure conditions previously indicated in the tower 16, the vapors withdrawn through the line 30 will be at about 535 p.s.i.g. and l18 F. When these vapors are passed through the heat exchanger 18, the vapors will be cooled to about l20 F., whereas the liquefied natural gas will be slightly warmed to enhance the subsequent fractionation there of. Cooling of the methane enriched vapors directed through the line 30 condenses a' portion of the vapors. Therefore, the vapors are directed through a line 32 from the heat exchanger 18 into an accumulator 34 which also functions as a separator for collecting the condensates in the lower portion thereof. These condensates are refluxed to the upper portion of the tower 16 through a line 35. The refluxed condensates will'be at about 120 from the heavier hydrocarbons in the tower 16. The

condensates being refluxed to the tower 16 will be enriched with methane, but will contain an appreciable proportion of heavier hydrocarbons. A typical analysis is:

Component: Mol. percent Methane 97.81 Ethane 2.19

On the other hand, the vapors withdrawn through a line 36 from the top of the refiuxaccumulaltor 34 will have a smaller percentage of heavier hydrocarbons, with a typical analysis thereof being as follows:

Component: 7 Mol. percent Methane 99.05 Ethane 1 0.95

It may also be noted that the vapors discharged through the line 36 will be at about 535 p.s.i.g. and about -l20 F. These vapors are passed through a series of heat exchangers 38, 40 and 42 to provide a substantial warming of the vapors. It is preferred that thermethane vapors be warmed by passage through the heat exchangers 38, 40 and 42 to a temperature of about 700 F. whereupon, the gas is expanded through a suitable expander 44 down to aboutp.s.i.g. for the recovery of a substantial amount of work from the revaporized methane. The device 44 may be of any suitable form, such as a turbine, which will form a work-producing zone throughwhich the methane may be expanded to produce work. In a typical installation, where about 255,398 pounds per/hr. of liquefied natural gas are fed to the tower 16, and having a composition as previously described, the expander 44 should produce about 7400 B.H.P.; whereas the pump 12 for increasing :the'pressure of the liquefield natural gas will require only about 790 B.H.P., thereby resulting in a substantial power recovery, from the system.

The exhaust from the expander 44 is fed through a line 46 to the heat exchanger 40 to provide heating of the feed to the expander, as previously described. After the revaporized methane has been passed through the heat exchanger 40, it may be used directly as a fuel, or reformed to a lower heat content and new specific gravity, as previously indicated; In the example disclosed, the revaporized methane discharging from the heat exchanger 40 will be at about 100 p.s.i.g. and 100 F.

The methane vapors passing from the line 36 to the heat exchanger 38 on their way to the expander 44 are initially heated by a heating medium passed through the heat exchanger 38. The heating medium passed through the heat exchanger 38 may be of any suitable form having a temperature higher than the temperature of the methane vapors in the line 36. When the present method is being used in combination with a reforming process, the heating medium for the heat exchanger 38 may conveniently be a hot fluid from the reforming operation. For the temperature and pressure conditions previously described, the heating medium passed through the heat exchanger 38 should have a temperature of about 81 F. This heating medium may then be transferred through a line 48 to the heat exchanger 20 used for heating the liquefied natural gas being fed to the fractionating tower 16. It will be understood, however, that separate heating mediums may be used in the exchangers 20 and 38, it being only necessary that the liquefield natural gas being fed to the tower 16 be raised approximately to its bubble point temperature, and the revaporized methane in the line 36 be raised to a temperature for eflicient heat transfer with the expanded methane vapors in the line 46;

' When it is desired to heat the revaporized methane in the line 36 to a temperature which will provide the most eflicient expansion of the methane through the expander 44 and permit use of this expanded methane for heat exchange relation with the feed to the expander, it is required that an additional heating medium of rather high temperature be passed through the heat exchanger 42. Any desired heating medium may be used with the heat exchanger 42, it only being necessary that the revaporized methane being fed to the expander 44 be increased in temperature for an eflicient expansion. When the present method is being used in combination with a reforming operation, a hot gas from the reforming operation at about 840 F. may be passed through the heat exchanger 42. Thus, the revaporized methane may be raised to a temperature of about 700 F. before passing through the expander 44.

From the foregoing it will be apparent that the present invention provides an efiicient method for separating methane from liquefied natural gas by using the minimum of apparatus, and with a minimum of cost. It will be further apparent that the separation of the methane from the heavier hydrocarbon components of a liquefied natural gas stream is accomplished simultaneously with revaporization of the methane, such that the separted components will be in proper form for use as a fuel or for further processing. The method may be performed in such a manner that a substantial amount of work may be recovered from the revaporized methane. It will also be apparent that the present invention provides a novel method of fractionating liquefield gases, wherein the overhead vapors from the fractionating zone are passed in heat exchange relation with the liquefied gases being fed to the fractionating zone, and wherein the resulting condensates are refluxed to the fractionating zone, to provide an efficient fractionation without the necessity of using a separate reflux condenser and refrigerant.

Changes may be made in the combination and arrangement of steps and procedures, as well as the form and arrangement of apparatus, heretofore set forth in specification and shown in the drawing, it being understood that changes may be made in the precise embodiment disclosed without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the following claims.

We claim:

1. In a method of separating the heavier hydrocarbons from liquefield natural gas containing a substantial proportion of methane, the steps of:

(a) feeding the liquefied natural gas into the medial portion of a fractionating zone,

(b) heating the contents of the lower portion of the fractionating zone to a temperature to produce methane enriched vapors in the upper portion of the fractionating zone,

(c) withdrawing vapors from the upper portion of the fractionating zone and directly passing said vapors in heat exchange relation with the liquefied natural gas being fed to the fractionating zone, to heat said feed and cool said vapors,

(d) separating condensates from said vapors, after they have been used in heat exchange relationship with the liquefied natural gas,

(e) refluxing said condensates to the upper portion of the fractionating zone for cooling the upper portion of the fractionating zone and inducing downward movement of heavier hydrocarbon enriched liquefield gas into the lower portion of the fractionating zone, and

(f) withdrawing the heavier hydrocarbon enriched liquefied gas from the lower portion of the fractionating zone.

2. A method as defined in claim 1 characterized further in heating the liquefied natural gas being fed to the fractionating zone to such an extent that said feed is approximately at its bubble point upon entering the fractionating zone.

3. A method as defined in claim 1 characterized further in expanding said methane enriched vapors, after removal of the condensates therefrom, through a workproducing zone.

4. A method as defined in claim 1 characterized further in compressing the liquefied natural gas being fed to the fractionating zone.

5. A method as defined in claim 1 characterized further in compressing the liquefied natural gas being fed to the fractionating zone, and heating the compressed liquefied natural gas to approximately its bubble point temperature.

6. In a method of separating the heavier hydrocarbons from liquefied natural gas containing a substantial proportion of methane and stored at about atmospheric pressure, the steps of:

(a) pumping the liquefied natural gas into the medial portion of a fractionating zone at an increased pressure,

(b) heating the lower portion of the fractionating zone to a temperature to produce methane enriched vapors in the upper portion of the fractionating zone,

(c) withdrawing the methane enriched vapors from the upper portion of the fractionating zone and directly passing said vapors in heat exchange relation with the pressurized liquefied natural gas being fed to the fractionating zone for heating said feed and cooling said vapors,

(d) separating the condensates from said vapors, after they have been used in heat exchange relationship with the liquefied natural gas.

(e) refluxing said condensates to the upper portion of the fractionating zone to cool the upper portion of the fractionating zone and enhance the accumulation of heavier hydrocarbon enriched liquid in the lower portion of the fractionating zone,

(f) withdrawing liquid from the lower portion of the fractionating zone, and

(g) expanding said vapors, after removal of said condensates, through a work-producing zone.

7. A method as defined in claim 6 characterized further in passing the expanded vapors in heat exchange relation with said vapors between removal of condensates from said vapors and expansion of said vapors.

8. A method as defined in claim 6 characterized further in heating the liquefied natural gas being fed to the fractionating zone to approximately the bubble point temperature thereof.

9. A method as defined in claim 6 characterized further in that the liquefied natural gas being fed to the fractionating zone is raised in pressure to about 585 p.s.i.g and heated to its bubble point temperature before entering the fractionating zone.

10. A method as defined in claim 6 characterized further in heating said vapors to about 700 F. before expansion in said work-producing zone.

11. In a method of separating the lower boiling temperature component from a liquefied gas mixture by use of a fractionating tower, the improvement which comprises feeding the liquefied gas mixture into the medial portion of the tower, re-boiling the contents of the lower portion of the tower to such a temperature to produce vapors enriched with the lower boiling temperature component in the upper portion of the tower, directly passing said vapors in heat exchange relation with the liquefied gas mixture being fed to the tower, separating condensates from said vapors, and refluxing said condensates back to the upper portion of the tower.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,465,599 De Brey Aug. 21, 1923 2,526,996 Crawford Oct. 24, 1950 2,583,090 Cost Jan. 22, 1952 2,600,110 Hachmuth June 10, 1952 2,666,019 Winn Ian. 12, 1954

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1465599 *Jun 1, 1918Aug 21, 1923De Brey Jan Heinrich ChristophProcess for treating hydrocarbons
US2526996 *Feb 21, 1947Oct 24, 1950Elliott CoMethod and apparatus for separating mixed gases
US2583090 *Dec 29, 1950Jan 22, 1952Elliott CoSeparation of natural gas mixtures
US2600110 *Jan 4, 1949Jun 10, 1952Phillips Petroleum CoFractional distillation method
US2666019 *Jul 28, 1950Jan 12, 1954Socony Vacuum Oil Co IncMethod for recovering propane and heavier hydrocarbons
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3362175 *Jul 7, 1965Jan 9, 1968Conch Int Methane LtdMethod of fractionating natural gas feed by preheating feed with fractionator overhead
US3405530 *Sep 23, 1966Oct 15, 1968Exxon Research Engineering CoRegasification and separation of liquefied natural gas
US3433026 *Nov 7, 1966Mar 18, 1969Judson S SwearingenStaged isenthalpic-isentropic expansion of gas from a pressurized liquefied state to a terminal storage state
US3456032 *Mar 14, 1966Jul 15, 1969Lummus CoUtilization of propane recovered from liquefied natural gas
US3524897 *Oct 17, 1968Aug 18, 1970Lummus CoLng refrigerant for fractionator overhead
US3531942 *Feb 12, 1968Oct 6, 1970James K La FleurCryogenic separation of fluids associated with a power cycle
US3548024 *Jun 25, 1969Dec 15, 1970Lummus CoRegasification of liquefied natural gas at varying rates with ethylene recovery
US3656312 *Dec 16, 1968Apr 18, 1972Messer Griesheim GmbhProcess for separating a liquid gas mixture containing methane
US3837172 *Jun 19, 1972Sep 24, 1974Synergistic Services IncProcessing liquefied natural gas to deliver methane-enriched gas at high pressure
US3846993 *Feb 1, 1971Nov 12, 1974Phillips Petroleum CoCryogenic extraction process for natural gas liquids
US4690702 *Sep 25, 1985Sep 1, 1987Compagnie Francaise D'etudes Et De Construction "Technip"Method and apparatus for cryogenic fractionation of a gaseous feed
US5114451 *Mar 12, 1990May 19, 1992Elcor CorporationLiquefied natural gas processing
US5600969 *Dec 18, 1995Feb 11, 1997Phillips Petroleum CompanyProcess and apparatus to produce a small scale LNG stream from an existing NGL expander plant demethanizer
US6510706May 23, 2001Jan 28, 2003Exxonmobil Upstream Research CompanyProcess for NGL recovery from pressurized liquid natural gas
US6889523Mar 7, 2003May 10, 2005ElkcorpLNG production in cryogenic natural gas processing plants
US6945075Oct 23, 2002Sep 20, 2005ElkcorpNatural gas liquefaction
US6986266 *Sep 22, 2003Jan 17, 2006Cryogenic Group, Inc.Process and apparatus for LNG enriching in methane
US7010937Apr 13, 2004Mar 14, 2006ElkcorpNatural gas liquefaction
US7069743 *Feb 20, 2002Jul 4, 2006Eric PrimSystem and method for recovery of C2+ hydrocarbons contained in liquefied natural gas
US7155931 *Sep 30, 2003Jan 2, 2007Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Liquefied natural gas processing
US7191617Aug 10, 2005Mar 20, 2007Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Hydrocarbon gas processing
US7204100May 4, 2004Apr 17, 2007Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Natural gas liquefaction
US7210311Jul 22, 2005May 1, 2007Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Natural gas liquefaction
US7216507Jun 3, 2005May 15, 2007Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Liquefied natural gas processing
US7234323 *Aug 24, 2005Jun 26, 2007Chevron U.S.A. Inc.Recovering natural gas liquids from LNG using vacuum distillation
US7310972Sep 17, 2004Dec 25, 2007Toyo Engineering CorporationProcess and apparatus for separation of hydrocarbons from liquefied natural gas
US7600396 *Aug 26, 2003Oct 13, 2009Fluor Technologies CorporationPower cycle with liquefied natural gas regasification
US7631516 *May 16, 2007Dec 15, 2009Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Liquefied natural gas processing
US7644676Jun 27, 2008Jan 12, 2010Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., Ltd.Storage tank containing liquefied natural gas with butane
US7841288Sep 25, 2009Nov 30, 2010Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., Ltd.Storage tank containing liquefied natural gas with butane
US8028724Jul 26, 2007Oct 4, 2011Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., Ltd.LNG tank and unloading of LNG from the tank
US8156758Aug 17, 2005Apr 17, 2012Exxonmobil Upstream Research CompanyMethod of extracting ethane from liquefied natural gas
US8316665Mar 21, 2006Nov 27, 2012Fluor Technologies CorporationIntegration of LNG regasification with refinery and power generation
US8381544Jul 18, 2008Feb 26, 2013Kellogg Brown & Root LlcMethod for liquefaction of natural gas
US8434325May 15, 2009May 7, 2013Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Liquefied natural gas and hydrocarbon gas processing
US8584488Jun 5, 2009Nov 19, 2013Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Liquefied natural gas production
US8590340Jan 9, 2008Nov 26, 2013Ortoff Engineers, Ltd.Hydrocarbon gas processing
US8667812May 27, 2011Mar 11, 2014Ordoff Engineers, Ltd.Hydrocabon gas processing
US8794030Mar 8, 2013Aug 5, 2014Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Liquefied natural gas and hydrocarbon gas processing
US8820096Jul 26, 2007Sep 2, 2014Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., Ltd.LNG tank and operation of the same
US8850849Nov 27, 2012Oct 7, 2014Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Liquefied natural gas and hydrocarbon gas processing
US8919148Sep 8, 2008Dec 30, 2014Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Hydrocarbon gas processing
US8943841Apr 23, 2009Feb 3, 2015Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., Ltd.LNG tank ship having LNG circulating device
US9021832Dec 28, 2010May 5, 2015Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Hydrocarbon gas processing
US9086188Jul 21, 2008Jul 21, 2015Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., Ltd.Method and system for reducing heating value of natural gas
US9360249Jan 14, 2005Jun 7, 2016Ihi E&C International CorporationGas conditioning process for the recovery of LPG/NGL (C2+) from LNG
US9476639Aug 26, 2010Oct 25, 2016Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Hydrocarbon gas processing featuring a compressed reflux stream formed by combining a portion of column residue gas with a distillation vapor stream withdrawn from the side of the column
US20030158458 *Feb 20, 2002Aug 21, 2003Eric PrimSystem and method for recovery of C2+ hydrocarbons contained in liquefied natural gas
US20040079107 *Oct 23, 2002Apr 29, 2004Wilkinson John D.Natural gas liquefaction
US20040177646 *Mar 7, 2003Sep 16, 2004ElkcorpLNG production in cryogenic natural gas processing plants
US20040187520 *Apr 13, 2004Sep 30, 2004Wilkinson John D.Natural gas liquefaction
US20050061029 *Sep 22, 2003Mar 24, 2005Narinsky George B.Process and apparatus for LNG enriching in methane
US20050066686 *Sep 30, 2003Mar 31, 2005ElkcorpLiquefied natural gas processing
US20050218041 *Sep 17, 2004Oct 6, 2005Toyo Engineering CorporationProcess and apparatus for separation of hydrocarbons from liquefied natural gas
US20050247078 *May 4, 2004Nov 10, 2005ElkcorpNatural gas liquefaction
US20050268649 *Jul 22, 2005Dec 8, 2005Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Natural gas liquefaction
US20060000234 *Jun 3, 2005Jan 5, 2006Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Liquefied natural gas processing
US20060032269 *Aug 10, 2005Feb 16, 2006Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Hydrocarbon gas processing
US20060065015 *Aug 24, 2005Mar 30, 2006Chevron U.S.A. Inc.Recovering natural gas liquids from LNG using vacuum distillation
US20060130520 *Dec 15, 2005Jun 22, 2006Abb Lummus Global Inc.Method for recovery of natural gas liquids for liquefied natural gas
US20060130521 *Dec 15, 2005Jun 22, 2006Abb Lummus Global Inc.Method for recovery of natural gas liquids for liquefied natural gas
US20060131218 *Dec 15, 2005Jun 22, 2006Abb Lummus Global Inc.Method for recovery of natural gas liquids for liquefied natural gas
US20070101732 *Aug 26, 2003May 10, 2007John MakPower cycle with liquefied natural gas regasification
US20080000265 *May 16, 2007Jan 3, 2008Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Liquefied Natural Gas Processing
US20080022717 *Oct 2, 2007Jan 31, 2008Toyo Engineering CorporationProcess and apparatus for separation of hydrocarbons from liquefied natural gas
US20080087041 *Aug 17, 2005Apr 17, 2008Denton Robert DMethod of Extracting Ethane from Liquefied Natural Gas
US20080190117 *Jul 26, 2007Aug 14, 2008Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., Ltd.Lng tank and operation of the same
US20080190118 *Jul 26, 2007Aug 14, 2008Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., Ltd.Lng tank and unloading of lng from the tank
US20080190136 *Jan 9, 2008Aug 14, 2008Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Hydrocarbon Gas Processing
US20080190352 *Jul 26, 2007Aug 14, 2008Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., Ltd.Lng tank ship and operation thereof
US20080295527 *Jan 8, 2008Dec 4, 2008Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., Ltd.Lng tank ship with nitrogen generator and method of operating the same
US20080307789 *Mar 21, 2006Dec 18, 2008Fluor Technologies CorporationIntegration of Lng Regasification with Refinery and Power Generation
US20090056371 *Mar 20, 2006Mar 5, 2009Paramasivam Senthil KumarMethod and Apparatus for Deriching a Stream of Liquefied Natural Gas
US20090100862 *Sep 8, 2008Apr 23, 2009Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Hydrocarbon Gas Processing
US20090199591 *Jun 27, 2008Aug 13, 2009Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., Ltd.Liquefied natural gas with butane and method of storing and processing the same
US20090199759 *Jun 27, 2008Aug 13, 2009Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., Ltd.Storage tank containing liquefied natural gas with butane
US20090211262 *Apr 23, 2009Aug 27, 2009Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., Ltd.Lng tank ship having lng circulating device
US20090259081 *Jul 21, 2008Oct 15, 2009Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., Ltd.Method and system for reducing heating value of natural gas
US20090266086 *Apr 23, 2009Oct 29, 2009Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., Ltd.Floating marine structure having lng circulating device
US20090293538 *Jun 18, 2009Dec 3, 2009Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Natural gas liquefaction
US20100011663 *Jul 18, 2008Jan 21, 2010Kellogg Brown & Root LlcMethod for Liquefaction of Natural Gas
US20100012015 *Sep 25, 2009Jan 21, 2010Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., Ltd.Storage tank containing liquefied natural gas with butane
US20100031700 *Jun 5, 2009Feb 11, 2010Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Liquefied natural gas and hydrocarbon gas processing
US20100122542 *Sep 9, 2009May 20, 2010Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., Ltd.Method and apparatus for adjusting heating value of natural gas
US20100287982 *May 15, 2009Nov 18, 2010Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Liquefied Natural Gas and Hydrocarbon Gas Processing
US20110067442 *Aug 26, 2010Mar 24, 2011Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Hydrocarbon Gas Processing
US20110067443 *Aug 26, 2010Mar 24, 2011Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Hydrocarbon Gas Processing
US20110120183 *Jun 5, 2009May 26, 2011Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Liquefied natural gas and hydrocarbon gas processing
US20110167868 *Dec 28, 2010Jul 14, 2011Ortloff Engineers, Ltd.Hydrocarbon gas processing
CN100406832CJul 1, 2004Jul 30, 2008奥特洛夫工程有限公司液化天然气的处理
CN101027528BAug 17, 2005Jun 15, 2011埃克森美孚上游研究公司Method of extracting ethane from liquefied natural gas
CN101160498BAug 26, 2005Oct 13, 2010阿梅克帕拉贡公司;Pi技术合作公司Process for extracting ethane and heavier hydrocarbons from lng
DE1551562A1 *Sep 11, 1967May 6, 1970Air LiquideVerfahren zur Herstellung eines methanreichen Fliessmittels aus verfluessigtem Naturgas unter niedrigem Anfangsdruck
WO2005035692A2 *Jul 1, 2004Apr 21, 2005Ortloff Engineers, LtdLiquefied natural gas processing
WO2005035692A3 *Jul 1, 2004Sep 14, 2006Hank M HudsonLiquefied natural gas processing
WO2006031362A1 *Aug 17, 2005Mar 23, 2006Exxonmobil Upstream Research CompanyMethod of extracting ethane from liquefied natural gas
WO2006039182A2 *Sep 21, 2005Apr 13, 2006Chevron U.S.A. Inc.Recovering natural gas liquids from lng using vacuum distillation
WO2006039182A3 *Sep 21, 2005Mar 1, 2007Chevron Usa IncRecovering natural gas liquids from lng using vacuum distillation
WO2006104799A2 *Mar 21, 2006Oct 5, 2006Fluor Technologies CorporationIntegrated of lng regasification with refinery and power generation
WO2006104799A3 *Mar 21, 2006Dec 21, 2006Fluor Tech CorpIntegrated of lng regasification with refinery and power generation
WO2006125759A1 *May 22, 2006Nov 30, 2006Shell Internationale Research Maatschappij B.V.Fischer-tropsch plant
WO2008066570A2 *May 16, 2007Jun 5, 2008Ortloff Engineers, LtdLiquefied natural gas processing
WO2008066570A3 *May 16, 2007Jul 31, 2008Ortloff Engineers LtdLiquefied natural gas processing
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/622
International ClassificationC10G5/06, F25J3/02, C07C7/04, F17C9/04, C10K1/04
Cooperative ClassificationC07C7/04, C10K1/04, F25J3/0238, F25J3/0233, F17C9/04, F25J3/0214, C10G5/06, F25J2270/04, F25J2200/02, F17C2265/05
European ClassificationF25J3/02A2L, C07C7/04, C10K1/04, F25J3/02C2, F17C9/04, F25J3/02C4, C10G5/06