Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2954026 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 27, 1960
Filing dateApr 27, 1955
Priority dateApr 27, 1955
Publication numberUS 2954026 A, US 2954026A, US-A-2954026, US2954026 A, US2954026A
InventorsJoseph M Spinks
Original AssigneeJoseph M Spinks
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Physiological traction device
US 2954026 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 27, 1960 Filed April 27, 1955 J. M. SPINKS PHYSIOLOGICAL TRACTION DEVICE 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. JOSEPH M. SPINKS ATTORNEY Y Sept. 27, 1960 J. M. SPINKS PHYSIOLOGICAL mono" DEVI-CE s Sheets-sheet 2 Filed April 2?, 195s FIG 6 INVENTOR.

' JOSEPH M. SPINKS BY ATTORNEY Sept. 27, 1960 J. M. SPINKS 2,954,026

PHYSIOLOGICAL TRACTION DEVICE Filed April 2'7, 1955 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. JOSEPH M. SPINKS 'ATTORNEY Unit d S ate Paten This invention relates to physiological traction devices and is particularly concerned with traction means for the spine, pelvic or cervical regions. While certain features of the total inventive concept here set forth are admirably adapted to patient control of the traction applied and to patient adjustment and manipulation, it will be understood that certain other features may lend themselves to hospital or like institutional use and hence the invention is in no way limited'or confined to either such use and may be considered as broadly and universally applicable under many widely varying conditions and environments of use.

Heretofore, traction units for the purpose specified have been limited in use and difficult in operation and adjustment. Such units have been characterized by the provision of a weighted cord, strap or chain passing over a small pulley and leading to a head engaging device of usually fixed dimensions such that for each patient the head piece required changing or difiicult adjustment. The use of small pulleys produced sluggish and unfaithful response, resulting from binding and improper leverage action. Such conventional devices were also under the sole control of a nurse, doctor or attendant and hence no patient manipulation or adjustment was possible. Furthermore, such devices were fixed with respect to the constant application of predetermined tension and were therefore of no avail where exercise by periodic tension H application was desired and no patient controlled means was provided for relieving tension.

It is therefore among the primary objects of the present invention to provide a novel and improved traction means designed to overcome these and other objections too, and deficiencies in, physiological traction devices heretofore available.

Among the more specific objects of the invention is to provide suspension and guide means for a traction cord, chain or strap by which free and responsive traction may be applied therethrough to the patient without danger of binding and with effective and efiicient leverage.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved head holding halter for a traction means of the type set forth particularly designed for ready and easy adjustment to various types and sizes of heads.

A further object is to provide in a device of the character described patient controlled means for the application or relief of tractive tension so as to minimize the time and constancy of an attendants presence when traction is applied.

It is also among the objects of the invention to provide a traction device wherein tractive tension may be intermittently applied so as to manipulate and exercise the area under treatment.

Numerous other objects, features and advantages of the invention will become apparent from consideration of the following specifications taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1"is aside elevation of that former? the inven- 2 tion more particularly designed for applying intermittent patient controlled tractive tension; 1

Fig. 2 is a side elevation of a novel and improved head halter forming part of the present invention.

Fig. 3 is a front elevation view of the halter of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a detail end elevation of the'pulley bracket of the apparatus of Fig. 1.

Fig. 5 is a detail end elevation of the treadle and bracket of the device of Fig. 1. 1

Fig. 6 is a side elevation of a form of the present invention designed for application to the head rail of apatients bed. l

Fig. 7 is a detail sectional view showing the mounting of the device of Fig. 6. 7 r

Fig. 8 is a view similar to Fig. 6 of that form of the present invention designed for attachment to the spring of a patients bed.

Fig. 9 is a perspective view of a floor supported traction unit embodying certain of the features of the present invention.

Fig. 10 is a side elevation of an inventive modification of the halter of Figs. 2 and 3.

Fig. 11 is a detail view of the strap arrangement of the halter of Fig. 10. a

In general terms, the present invention, exclusive of the halter, may be defined as including a traction device having means controllable by the patient for applying and/or relieving tractive tension. invention shown in Figs. 1,' 4 and 5, the traction is applied by foot power of the patient througha treadle means while the patient is preferably in sitting position. In that form of the invention shown in Figs. 6, 7, -8 and 9, traction is relieved or applied by the patients manipulation of a weight relieving member. In these forms of the invention, a relatively large pulley is providedto insure free running thereover of the tension cord, strap or chain and the proximity of such pulley to the;appli! cation of traction is such that an advantageous'leverage is obtained. In that form of the invention shown in Fig; l, a scale is provided in view of the patient so that a prescribed traction tension may be readily and easily applied. In that form of the invention presented by Fig. 6, the device may be readily mounted at the head of the patients bed and may be removed and conveniently stored when not in use. In that form of the invention presented by Fig. 8, the'device is secured to the bed spring and thus may partake of vertical adjustments of the head section of a Gatch type bed without disturbing the direction of tractive tension. In Fig. 9, there is presented a tractive device for floor support and one vertically adjustable to readily conform to various places of use. Figs. 2, 3,10 and 11 disclose halters which are readily adjustable to conform the same to the patients head without depriving him of the desirable free pivotal movement between separate head engaging the halter and trained over the substantially large pulley 22. The tension member 21 passes downwardly from the pulley in front of the patient to engage the outer end of a foot treadle 23 as at 24. Intermediate the upper flight 25 and the lower flight 26 of the forward downwardly extensioning flight of the tension member 21, conventional spring scale 27 is placed to be in view or the patient and thus permitting his constant reading of the tension applied. The large pulley 22 over which the tension membe;

Patented Sept. 27, 1960 i In that form of the 21 is trained is preferably supported as shown in Fig. 4 by a clevis 30 rotatably supported by a vertical bolt 31 passing through the eye of a pair of converging crane arms 32. The crane includes a vertical brace 33 adapted to embrace the front of a door 34 or like surface and its upper end includes a hook portion 35 receivable over the upper door edge thus to removably support the crane and its pulley as shown. The treadle Z3 is hingedly mounted as at 36 to a U-shaped bracket 37 received over the lower edge of the door 34.

By the foregoing arrangement, it will be seen that a patient seated in the chair 38 adjacent the door 34 may, by the pressure of his foot on the treadle Z3, tension the member 21 as desired, gauging the foot force to be applied by the scale 27. Obviously the chair may be located with respect to the pulley 22 at such angle as to best apply the tractive tension. It will be seen that the large diameter of the pulley 22 insures free running of the tension member 21 and the application of proper leverage from the treadle 23. It will further be noted from the structure thus described that the device may be easily applied and removed from the door 34 and thus this form of the invention is admirably suited to domestic use where the patient is at home and where he may himself determine the amount, frequency, and duration of the traction applied.

By reference to Fig. 6, it will be noted that the invention is not limited to home use as indicated as appropriate for the device of Fig. 1. In Fig. 6, the pulley 49 is mounted between side supporting plates 41 which are joined forwardly of the pulley and have secured thereto an L-shaped bracket 42 adapted to receive the head rail 43 of the patients bed 44. By this mounting of the large pulley 40, a desirable angle to the patients body is maintained for the tension member 45 which is trained over the pulley and to which is secured the traction weight 46. In order that the patient may himself relieve the tractive tension applied by the weight 46, the tension member 45 and the halter 47, a yoke 48 is pivotally mounted on the axle 49 of the pulley 44 To the outer and upper end 51 of the yoke 48, a pull cord 52 is secured so that by pull thereon by the patient the yoke may be rocked about the pulley axle at the will of the patient. The yoke 48 has mounted across the bifurcated attached ends thereof a bar 53 to which is attached a lifting cord, strap or chain 54, the lower end of which is attached to the lower end of the tension member 45 adjacent the weight 46. By this arrangement, it will be seen that as the patient pulls on the cord 52, the yoke 48 will be rocked in clockwise direction, thus moving the bar 53 upward and lifting the member 54 to take up the weight 46. Thus it will be seen that the patient himself and at his own convenience may apply or relieve the tension applied by the weight 46.

In that form of the invention shown in Fig. 8, the large pulley 60 is mounted between a pair of upstanding brackets 61 adjustably mounted in a holder 62 and secured in adjusted position by a wing nut 63. The holder 62 is secured as at 64 to the end member of the tiltable head section '65 of a Gatch bed, thus as the bed head section is tiltingly adjusted, the direction of tractive tension remains constant since the pulley 60, tension member 66 and weight 67 move as a unit with the head section of the bed springs. If desired, the weight relieving yoke arrangement of Fig. 6 may be applied in this form of the invention in the manner shown.

In Fig. 9 of the drawings, the unit is designed to be supported from the floor. A base 7% is provided from which there extends a vertical sub-standard 71. Vertically mounted on the sub-standard 71, there is a vertical bar 72 carrying outwardly projecting pulley bearings 73. The large pulley 74 is mounted between the bearings 73 and thereover is trained the tension member 75, one end of which is attached to the patient halter while the outer end has secured thereto the conventional weight 4 76. In this form of the invention, the weight relieving yoke 77 with its lifting bar 78 and lifting member 79 are shown in the manner and for the purpose as described in connection with Fig. 6.

Referring now to Figs. 2 and 3, the halter of the present invention comprises an inverted substantially U-shaped rigid member 80 preferably formed of steel rod. An eye 81 at the web of the member in the central portion thereof provides for the attachment of the tractive tension member. The lower terminal ends 82 of the member 80 are turned outwardly to receive thereover and thereabove the tunneled ends of a rear neck band 83. By the loose engagement of the lower straight shank portions 84 of the member 80 through the tunnels of the neck band, it will be seen that the neck band may be adjusted upwardly along the shanks. The outer terminal ends of the neck band forwardly of the passage of the shanks 84 there through receive buckles 85 for engaging the terminal ends 87 of a chin strap 86. It will be seen that this simple, inexpensive and readily adjustable arrangement insures a fit of the halter to various sizes of heads. It is important to note that since the chin strap is engaged with the forwardly extending portions of the ends of the neck band the adjustment thereof is reflected in the fit of the neck band as distinct from an attachment of the chin strap directly to the member 80.

In that form of halter shown in Figs. 10 and 11, the rigid steel member 90 with its attaching ring 91 secures the terminal end loops 92 of the neck band 93. In this form of halter the lower ends of the side shanks 94 of the member 90 are turned abruptly outward as at 95 and to the end thereof are pivotally attached depending buckle plates 96, the buckles 97 of which engage the ends 98 of the chin strap. In this form of the invention, the adjustment of the chin strap may be made independently of the neck band to make it fit the patients head for correct angle of traction pull.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that the various inventive concepts here presented provide novel, simple and economical means for maximum patient comfort as Well as providing patient control, both as to applying tension and as to operation for the purpose of exercise. The invention will also be seen to include novel and improved halter means. It will be understood that in the practice of the invention, numerous changes, modifications and the full use of equivalents may be resorted to without departure from the spirit or scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A device for applying periodic cervical traction including a halter, a flexible tension member secured to said halter, a pulley over which said member is trained, and a pivoted member engaging said tension member and operable by the patient to tension said tension member, said pivoted member comprising a foot treadle.

2. A device for applying to a patient periodic cervical traction including a halter, a flexible tension member secured to said halter, a pulley over which said member is trained, a pivoted member engaging said tension member and operable by the patient to tension said tension member, said pivoted member comprising a foot treadle, and a scale in the line of the patients vision responsive to the degree of tension applied.

3. A device for applying to a patient periodic cervical traction including a halter, a flexible tension member secured to said halter, a pulley over which said member is trained, a pivoted member engaging said tension member and operable by the patient to tension said tension member, said pivoted member comprising a foot treadle, and a scale in the line of the patients vision responsive to the degree of tension applied, and means for mounting said pulley and treadle at spaced points.

4. A device for applying to a patient periodic cervical traction including a halter, a flexible tension member secured to said halter, a pulley over which said member is trained, a pivoted member engaging said tension member and operable by the patient to tension said tension member, said pivoted member comprising a foot treadle, and a scale in the line of the patients vision responsive to the degree of tension applied, and means for mounting said pulley and treadle at spaced points above and below the patient respectively.

5. A cervical traction apparatus comprising a door engaging pulley, a door engaging foot treadle pivotally mounted to said door and extending outwardly therefrom, and a traction element connected with said treadle traversing said pulley and engaging a patient halter.

6. A cervical traction apparatus comprising a door engaging pulley, a door engaging foot treadle pivotally mounted to said door and extending outwardly therefrom, a traction element connected with said treadle traversing said pulley and engaging a patient halter, and a patient seat located between said treadle and said pulley.

7. The device of claim 6 in which the pulley is supported from a crane supported by the upper edge of the door.

8. The device of claim 6 in which the treadle is supported by a bracket engaging the lower edge of the door.

9. The device of claim 6 in which the pulley is supported by a crane mounted on the upper edge of the door and the treadle is supported by a bracket engaging the lower door edge, said traction element being connected to said foot treadle at a position intermediate the ends of said foot treadle.

10. A device for applying to a patient periodic cervical traction comprising, a rigid inverted U-shaped member, a neck band engaging said member, an adjustable chin strap extending forwardly of said member and operably associated therewith, said neck band and said chin strap extending from the extremities of said U-shaped member, the extremities of said U-shaped member terminating at a position immediately above the ears of the patient, a flexible tension member secured to said U-shaped member and normally extending away from said U-s'haped member, a pulley over which said member is trained, a pivoted member engaging said tension member and operable by the patient to tension said tension member, said pivoted member comprising a foot treadle extending from a pivot point to a position adjacent the foot of the patient, said tension member being connected to said 6,

foot treadle at a position intermediate the length of said foot treadle, and a scale in the line of the patients Vision responsive to the degree of tension applied, and means for mounting said pulley and the pivot of said treadle at spaced points above and below the patient respectively.

11. A physiological traction device including a traction member for the spine, -a pulley over Which said member is trained, a patient engaging head halter at one end of said member and means at the opposite end of said member for applying tension therethrough to said halter, said last mentioned means being patient controlled, and including a weight and means for relieving said member of said weight which includes an arm movable by the patient and a connection between said arm and said weight for relieving said weight from the traction member.

12. Apparatus as set forth in claim 11 in which the arm is pivoted with the axis of the pulley and includes a bar connected with the tension member intermediate the weight and the pulley.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 4,968 Knapp Feb. 13, 1847 665,243 Luria Jan. 1, 1901 762,832 Minges June 14, 1904 785,639 Seidler Mar. 21, 1905 923,862 Langworthy June 8, 1909 1,347,913 Rink July 27, 1920 1,456,030 M-olby May 22, 1923 (U.S. Corresponding to Molby-French cited in Paper No. 3)

2,633,125 Yellin Mar. 31, 1953 2,701,564 Wilhelm Feb. 8, 1955 2,714,885 Uhland Aug. 9, 1955 FOREIGN PATENTS 526,306 France June 29, 1921

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4968 *Feb 13, 1847 Spinal elevator
US665243 *Oct 30, 1899Jan 1, 1901Adolfo LuriaMedical bed.
US762832 *Sep 23, 1903Jun 14, 1904Cartilage CompanyPhysical development apparatus.
US785639 *Aug 17, 1904Mar 21, 1905William Wilson SeidlerBody-stretcher.
US923862 *Feb 25, 1908Jun 8, 1909Solon M LangworthySurgical head-holder.
US1347913 *Dec 24, 1919Jul 27, 1920Rink Harold JApparatus for rectifying spinal deformities
US1456030 *Mar 16, 1921May 22, 1923Molby Walter DavidApparatus for physical culture
US2633125 *Jun 18, 1951Mar 31, 1953Yellin LouisIntermittent cervical traction apparatus
US2701564 *Jul 27, 1953Feb 8, 1955Tru G WilhelmHead traction means
US2714885 *Jan 29, 1954Aug 9, 1955Floyd M UhlandTraction treatment device
FR526306A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3118441 *Nov 25, 1960Jan 21, 1964George Ivor ProsserPhysio-therapeutic apparatus
US3359976 *Feb 23, 1965Dec 26, 1967Laval Jr Claude CPortable device for maintaining the back of a vertebral body in traction
US4407274 *Jun 5, 1981Oct 4, 1983Goodley Paul HCervical traction device
US4580554 *Nov 28, 1983Apr 8, 1986Paul GoodleyTraction device
US5451202 *Sep 22, 1993Sep 19, 1995Pacific Research Laboratories, Inc.Cervical traction device
US5632283 *Aug 14, 1995May 27, 1997Carden; EdwardPatient chin support and method
US5957876 *Aug 7, 1997Sep 28, 1999D'amico; Anthony T.Traction device for physical therapy
US6059693 *Mar 5, 1996May 9, 2000Douglas L. MyersWrist relief device
US6171314Oct 22, 1998Jan 9, 2001Stuart L. RotramelMethod and apparatus for maintaining open air passageways
US6994683Aug 4, 2004Feb 7, 2006David StarrPortable lumbar traction device
US7033333Jul 29, 2003Apr 25, 2006Arthur CroftSelf actuated cervical (neck) traction device
US7144380 *Jul 23, 2002Dec 5, 2006Gilliam Larry ATraction method and device
US7341567Sep 10, 2003Mar 11, 2008D Amico Anthony TTraction device for physical therapy
US7544175Aug 9, 2005Jun 9, 2009D Amico Anthony TTraction device for physical therapy
US20030018287 *Jul 23, 2002Jan 23, 2003Gilliam Larry A.Traction method and device
US20040092854 *Sep 10, 2003May 13, 2004D'amico Anthony T.Traction device for physical therapy
US20060030807 *Aug 4, 2004Feb 9, 2006David StarrPortable lumbar traction device
US20130066373 *Sep 14, 2011Mar 14, 2013Chung-Fong LiaoBody hauling mechanism
EP0237996A2 *Mar 14, 1987Sep 23, 1987Werner BleschSuspension device for relieving the spinal column
EP0237996A3 *Mar 14, 1987Aug 17, 1988Werner BleschSuspension device for relieving the spinal column
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/36, 602/32
International ClassificationA61H1/02, A63B21/16
Cooperative ClassificationA61H1/0218, A63B21/1645
European ClassificationA61H1/02D