Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2954618 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 4, 1960
Filing dateMar 19, 1959
Priority dateMar 19, 1959
Publication numberUS 2954618 A, US 2954618A, US-A-2954618, US2954618 A, US2954618A
InventorsZoltan Rados
Original AssigneeBen Sunray
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Replaceable inserts for shoes and the like
US 2954618 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Z. RADOS TS FOR SHOES AND THE LIK REPLACEABLE INSER Filed March 19, 1959 INVENTOR.

ZOLTAN RADOS clef; ATTORNEY United States Patent Ofiice 2,954,618 Patented Dot. 4, 1960 REPLA'CEABLE INSERTS FOR SHOES AND THE LIKE Zoltan Rados, Bronx, N.Y. (2545 Beverly Ave, Santa Monica, Calif.), assignor of fifteen percent to Ben Sunray, Flushing, NY.

Filed Mar. 19, 1959, Ser. No. 800,512

1 Claim. (CI. 36-25) This invention concerns novel heel and toe constructions for shoes and the like.

Theinvention has as a principal object provision of a replaceable heel or toe insert for a shoe. The shoe heel or toe insert is formed of resilient rubber material and is adapted for easy application to a heel or toe portion of the sole of a shoe, the attached heel or toe insert being held in place by friction and the resiliency thereof.

A further object is the provision of a removable resilient shoe heel or toe insert which is so constructed and formed that it will have an interfitting and interlocking relation with the heel or toe portion of the sole of the shoe with which it is associated.

A still further object is the provision of a replaceable heel or toe insert which is easily mounted in position and which when once mounted will be firmly secured in place, until the replaceable heel or toe insert is worn, when it becomes easily removable from the shoe to which it has shoe and fitting into a recess in the replaceable heel or toe insert.

The invention provides a means whereby the user can replace his own worn shoe heel and toe structures with new ones without requiring any particular skill and tools, and at very low cost.

. For further comprehension of the invention, and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings, and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

In the accompanying drawings forming a material part of this disclosure:

Fig. l is a perspective view of a shoe heel structure embodying one form of the invention.

Fig. 2 is a similar view of a shoe heel structure embodying another modified form of the invention.

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of a portion of a shoe showing the heel structure of Fig. 2 fixed thereon and another replaceable heel structure partly mounted on the fixed heel.

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of another modified form of heel lift adapted for use on a ladys shoe.

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of a fixed heel mounting structure adapted to accommodate the heel lift of Fig. 4 on a heel of a ladys shoe.

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of a portion of a fixed heel of a ladys shoe adapted to mount the heel lift of Fig. 4 thereon.

Fig. 7 is a bottom plan view of a shoe sole showing modified fixed heel and toe insert mounting structures according to the invention.

Fig. 8 is a bottom plan view of a replaceable toe insert adapted to be used with the toe portion mounting structure of Fig. 7.

Fig. 9 is a sectional view taken on line 9-9 of Fig. 8.

Referring to Fig. 1, there is shown a heel mounting structure 223* embodying one form of the invention. This structure 22 is adapted to be mounted on a heel; portion 23 of the sole 21 of a shoe, a portion of which is shown in Fig. 3. The heel structure 22 has a U-shaped or horseshoe-shaped body defining a U-shaped recess 24. The recess has a fiat bottom and a side wall 26 which is undercut to define a dovetailed groove 25. Holes 36 serve to receive nails or screws whereby the structure is secured to the heel portion 223 of a shoe sole 21 as shown in Fig. 3. The U-shaped body 22 is adapted to accommodate removably a replaceable heel structure, such as the heel structure 28 shown in Fig. 3. Heel 28 is formed of resilient rubber or plastic material and has the shape of the heelportion 23 of the sole 21. It has aliat bottom 29 and a U-shaped outer wall. Extending from the inner or upper side 30 of the heel is a U-shaped tenon 31* having a flaring dovetailed side wall adapted to fit into the dovetailed groove 25 of the mounting structure 22 of the shoe. A wedge-shaped detent 35 is mounted at the bight end of the structure 22', and projects upwardly therefrom. Accordingly, a shaped hole is formed in the facing side of the heel structure, to receive the detent 35 Another modified form of heel mounting structure 22 is shown in Fig. 9. This form of mounting structure is somewhat similar to the form of structure shown in Fig. 8 except that three spaced detents 33 are provided in place of a single detent 35 In Fig. 3, the modified form of heel mounting structure 22 is shown attached to the heel portion 23 of the sole 21 Heel structure 28 is shown being mounted on the structure 22 in Fig. 3. Structure 2? has a plurality of spaced pins or pegs 33 projecting upwardly therefrom. Corresponding spaced holes 34 are formed in the facing side 30 of heel structure 2%. Heel structure 23 has a dovetailed tenon 31 of U-shape.

Figs. 4-6 illustrate heel mounting, arrangements especially adapted for ladies shoes. Heel lift 50. has a dovetailed tenon 52 whose side wall 53 is ridged rather than flat. This. ridged wall fits into a groove 54 which has a V-shaped cross section and is formed in the U-shaped mounting structure 56 which has a recess 55 with flat bottom 57. Holes 58 in the U-shaped rim permit nailing the structure to a heel 60 shown in dotted lines in Fig. 5. Detent pin 33 on structure 56 engages in a recess 62 in the heel lift 50 to retain the lift on the heel 60.

Fig. 6 shows the heel mounting structure 56 integrally formed with the heel 60 The U-shaped recess 55 is formed in the end of the heel and this recess is provided with a dovetailed groove 54 for retaining the tenon 52 of heel lift 50. The recess has a flat bottom :57 which receives the side 63 of the tenon 52.

In Figs. 7-9 there is shown a sole 21 provided with a heel mounting structure 22. This structure has a U-shaped or horseshoe-shaped body defining a U-shaped recess 24. The recess has a flat bottom and a side wall which is undercut to define a dovetailed groove adapted to accommodate removably a replaceable: heel structure, such as the heel structure 28 shown in Fig. 3. In addition, the sole is provided with a toe mounting structure 72. This structure includes a generally U-shaped recess 74 having an undercut dovetail grooved side wall 77. A detent pin or projection 75 extends from the bight end of recess 74. A toe insert for mounting in the toe mounting structure is best shown in Figs. 8 and 9. It is a resilient rubber member provided with a U-shaped dovetailed tenon 82 having an inclined side wall 84 which fits into the dovetail grooved wall 77 of the mounting structure.

As best shown in Fig. 9, a hole or recess 83 is formed near the bight end of the toe insert to receive the pin 75. The base 78 of the toe insert is thicker than the tenon 82. This base takes up wear on the toe portion of the shoe and when Worn away, the toe insert 80 can easily be peeled olf of the toe mounting structure 72 for re placement with a new toe insert 80. Thus, without use of tools or any special skill or facilities, the user can re place his own shoe toes and heels when worn. If desired, the user can obtain several shoe toe inserts and replaceable heels from the dealer at the time he purchases his shoes, or he can purchase the replaceable heels and toe inserts separately 'as needed. The mounting structures, if integrally formed with the heel portions of the soles as shown in Figs. 6 and 7, will be fabricated at the factory where the shoe is made. The mounting structures of Figs. 1-3, and may be applied by a shoe repairman to any conventional shoe sole. Thereafter, the user can attach his own replaceable heels at will without requiring further use of the repairmans services in this regard. The old worn shoe heels are health hazards as they tend to twist and disfigure the normal condition and growth of the angles of the wearer, therefore, this invention facilitates the interchanging of old shoe heels which may be readily detached by lifting and removed when they become thinner and worn. The invention is applicable to the heels or toes of mens, ladies and childrens shoes, as explained above.

While I have illustrated and described the preferred embodiments of my invention, it is to be understood that 'I do not limit myself to the precise constructions herein disclosed and that various changes and modifications may be made within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claim.

Referring to Fig. 1, there is shown a heel mounting structure 22 embodying one form of the invention. This structure 22 is adapted to be mounted on a heel portion 23 of the sole 21 of a shoe, a portion of which is shown in Fig. 3. The heel structure 22 has a U-shaped or horseshoe-shaped body defining a U-shaped recess 24. The recess has a flat bottom and a. side wall 26 which is undercut to define a dovetailed groove 25. Holes 36 serve to receive nails or screws whereby the structure is secured to the heel portion 23 of a shoe sole 21 as shown in Fig. 3. The U-shaped body 22 is adapted to accommodate removably a replaceable heel structure, such as the heel structure 28 shown in Fig. 3. Heel 28 is formed of resilient rubber or plastic material and has the shape of the heel portion 23 of the sole 21". It has a flat bottom 29 and a U-shaped outer wall. Ex-

tending from the inner or upper side 30 of the heel is a U-shaped tenon 3:1 having a flaring dovetailed side wall adapted to fit into the dovetailed groove 25 of the mounting structure 22 of the shoe. A wedge-shaped detent 35 is mounted at the bight end of the structure 22 and projects upwardly therefrom. Accordingly, a shaped hole is formed in the facing side of the heel structure, to receive the detent 35*.

Another modified form of heel mounting structure 22 is shown in Fig. 9. This form of mounting structure is somewhat similar to the form of structure shown in Fig. 8 except that three spaced detents 33 are provided in place of a single detent 35*.

In Fig. 3, the modified form of heel mounting structure 22 is shown attached to the heel portion 23 of the sole 21 Heel structure 28 is shown being mounted on the structure 22 in Fig. 3. Structure 22 has a plurality of spaced pins or pegs 33 projecting upwardly therefrom. Corresponding spaced holes 34 are formed in the facing side 30 of heel structure 28 Heel structure 28 has a dovetailed tenon 31 of U-shape.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent is:

In a shoe, an outer sole having a recess in the center of the toe portion thereof and opening outwardly of the toe portion, said recess having an outer wide rectangularshaped portion and an inner restricted U-shaped portion with rounded end, said recess having an undercut dovetail peripheral wall, and a rubber insert similar in configuration to the recess in said recess, said insert having a beveled side wall interlocking with the undercut peripheral wall of the recess, and a detent pin radiating from the base of the recess, said insert having a recess in its surface adapted to receive the pin for releasably holding the insert in position in the recess.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,156,769 Fortin Oct. 12, 1915 1,490,797 Borger Apr. 15, 1924 1,674,549 Hobert June 19, 1928 1,966,293 Gillis July 10, 1934 2,125,158 Gillis July 26, 1938 2,173,558 Lindblom Sept. 19, 1939 2,582,551 Malherbe Jan. 15, 1952 2,806,302 Sharpe Sept. 17, 1957 FOREIGN PATENTS 809,891 Germany Aug. 2, 1951 823,964 France Oct. 25, 1937 927,373 Germany May 5, 1955 1,010,606 France Mar. 26, 1952 tari

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1156769 *Nov 25, 1914Oct 12, 1915Charles W FortinDetachable shoe-heel.
US1490797 *Aug 7, 1922Apr 15, 1924Borger Elmer WRubber heel
US1674549 *Nov 30, 1925Jun 19, 1928Clayton HobertDetachable shoe heel
US1966293 *Aug 19, 1933Jul 10, 1934Gillis George HHeel seat cushioning attachment and the method of applying the same
US2125158 *Mar 20, 1937Jul 26, 1938Gillis George HLocking device for removable heels
US2173558 *Jul 2, 1938Sep 19, 1939Erik Vilhelm Walter Hallwyl VoDetachable heel
US2582551 *Sep 5, 1950Jan 15, 1952Malherbe Gerhardus LShoe heel structure
US2806302 *Mar 15, 1957Sep 17, 1957Sharpe Walter AReplaceable heel structure
DE909891C *Nov 29, 1950Apr 26, 1954Ruf WalterFahrgestellrahmen zur Aufnahme der Antriebs- und Fahrwerksgruppen und des Karosserieaufbaues fuer Motorfahrzeuge
DE927373C *Mar 10, 1954May 5, 1955Jakob GeibDas Spritzen verhindernder Absatz
FR823964A * Title not available
FR1010606A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4882856 *Apr 25, 1988Nov 28, 1989Glancy John JCushion wedge for custom control of impact and pronation upon heel-strike in various weights of wearers
US5519950 *Apr 17, 1995May 28, 1996Wang; Chia-ChinStructure for engaging a heel to a shoe
US20120186110 *Jan 25, 2011Jul 26, 2012Mark RecchiFootwear with heel lift
WO1991007108A1 *Nov 19, 1990May 30, 1991Jeffrey A SinkAthletic shoe
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/25.00R, 36/75.00R, 36/73, 36/71.5, 36/72.00R
International ClassificationA43B13/00, A43B13/28
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/28
European ClassificationA43B13/28