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Publication numberUS2956547 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 18, 1960
Filing dateSep 25, 1957
Priority dateSep 25, 1957
Publication numberUS 2956547 A, US 2956547A, US-A-2956547, US2956547 A, US2956547A
InventorsHovey Jr Le Roy F
Original AssigneeHovey Jr Le Roy F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fountain pen
US 2956547 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1950 LE ROY F. HOVEY, JR ,956,547

FOUNTAIN- PEN Filed Sept. 25, 1957' INVENTOR LEROY F. HOVEY, JR.

B WzfiW/ A HIS ATTORNEYS nited rates 2,956,547 Patented Oct. 18, 195G ice FOUNTAIN PEN Le Roy F. Hovey, Jr., 99 S. Windsor Ave., Brightwaters, N.Y.

Filed Sept. 25, 1957, Ser. No. 686,068

6 Claims. (Cl. 12046):

This invention relates to fountain pens generally and, more particularly, to a simplified fountain pen of unique and attractive design which embodies novel ink-retaining features.

Conventional fountain pens embody a great many individual parts which must be assembled by fitting or attaching the parts together. The present invention provides a fountain pen of greatly simplified construction in which the number of parts to be assembled is greatly reduced in comparison to conventional fountain pens without a corresponding reduction in the quality or performance of the pen.

The fountain pen of the present invention comprises a unitary pen body made of relatively resilient material and having a nib and nib holder at one end thereof. The pen body is formed with a hollow cavity therein which serves as an ink reservoir, and a passage which permits the ink to flow from the reservoir to the nib. This ink reservoir is defined at least in part by a relatively thin wall of the resilient material which may be squeezed and released to fill the reservoir with ink. The pen is also provided with means to close the passage to stop the fiow of ink to the nib when the pen is not in use.

As a supplemental or alternative feature, the fountain pen of the present invention may include means for metering the flow of ink through the passage in the fountain pen body in a direction from the reservoir to the nib, While permitting a freer flow of ink in the opposite direction during filling.

For a more complete understanding of the fountain pen of the present invention, reference may be had to the detailed description which follows and to the accompanying drawing, in which:

Figure 1 is a cross-sectional view of the body of the fountain pen of the present invention with the cap removed;

Figure 2 is a view similar to Figure 1 with the cap in place;

Figure 3 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 33 of Figure 1, showing the shape of one portion of the passage which connects the ink reservoir and the nib;

Figure 4 is a view similar to Figure 3 but showing a passage of somewhat different shape;

Figure 5 is a fragmentary view of a pen body embodying the present invention but illustrating an alternative or supplementary means for closing the ink passage when the pen is not in use; and

Figure 6 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view of another construction of the pen body illustrating a valve interposed between the ink reservoir and the passage which carries the ink to the nib.

Referring to the drawing, the fountain pen of the present invention includes generally a cap 10 and a pen body 11. The pen body 11, in the form shown, is a one-piece construction which may be made from solid stock or it may be molded. It is preferably made of a semi-rigid resilient transparent or translucent plastic material; polyethylene, for example, may be employed. The cap 10 may be either metal or plastic.

The pen body 11 is formed at one end with a suitable recess for receiving a nib 12 and a nib holder 13 therein. Although a separate nib holder 13 is contemplated, it is obvious that the nib holder may also be formed of plastic as part of the one-piece pen body.

The interior of the one-piece pen body 11 is formed with a cavity 14 at the end opposite the nib and nib holder, and this cavity 14 serves as the ink storage reservoir for the pen. The portion of the pen body intermediate the ink storage reservoir and the nib and nib holder is relatively solid, except for the restricted passage or channel 15 which conducts the ink from the reservoir to the nib.

The passage 15 has one end 15a in communication with the nib and the other end 15b in communication with the ink reservoir. The end 15a is formed centrally within the otherwise solid end of the pen body. This permits the pen body to be held firmly or tightly by the fingers of the person using the pen without closing the passage 15 to stop the flow of ink. The other end 15b is offset from the center of the pen body in proximity to the outer periphery thereof. This portion of the passage is relatively wide and shallow so that it may be more readily closed by the application of pressure against the outer surface of the pen body. For example, it may be mouth-shaped, as shown in Figure 3, or oval, as shown in Figure 4.

In order to cut off or curtail the flow of ink through the passage 15, the outer surface of the pen body in proximity to the passage 15 is provided with a rounded nose formation 16 which, when the cap 10 is applied to or screwed on the pen body, is depressed to close the passage, as shown in Figure 2. To reinforce the cap, if it is made of plastic or other similar material, the open end thereof is provided with a metal band or ring 17 which, when the cap is properly applied to the pen body, is adapted to encircle the Zone of the pen body in which the nose 16 is formed. If the cap is made of metal, this band or ring 17 would not be required. A sponge 26 or other absorbent material can be afiixed within the closed end of the cap 10 in the event there is some slight leakage of ink, but if the pen is properly constructed the sponge can be eliminated because the action of the air pressure within the ink reservoir on the ink in the passage 15 is cut off by closing the passage. Thus, it is not necessary to provide the closure means for the passage in proximity to the nib to prevent leakage.

The pen may be filled simply by removing the cap, immersing the nib in ink, and then squeezing and releasing the resilient wall which defines the ink reservoir 14. Ink is drawn in this manner into the reservoir. The ink supply will be visible if the pen body is made of a transparent or translucent plastic. It may be desirable to form internal or external longitudinal ribs (not shown) on the wall defining the reservoir to increase the amount of pressure which must be exerted thereon to expel ink in case pressure is accidentally applied to the wall defining the resermm In Figure 5, an alternative or supplementary arrangement is shown for closing the ink passage 15. This arrangement is particularly advantageous for a pen of a type which is not equipped with a cap, or when a capequipped pen has the cap removed from the pen body. In this embodiment, the pen is provided with a ring 18 which encircles the pen body and passes through a hole in a boss 19 formed integrally with the pen body. The boss 19 serves as a pivotal mounting for the ring 18. In the position illustrated in Figure 5, the ring is shown removed from the nose formation 16, in which position the passage 15 is open. When, however, the ring is pivoted onto the nose formation (as shown in broken lines), pressure is applied to the wall separating the passage and the outer periphery of the pen body to close the passage. The summit of the nose formation 16 is provided with a groove 20 which holds the ring in position on the nose and prevents the ring from slipping off.

It may be desirable to interpose an alternative or supplementary means of retaining the ink within the reservoir of the pen body. This supplementary means is preferably a one-way valve in combination with means forming a restricted passage. The restricted passage meters the flow of ink from the ink reservoir to the nib when the valve is closed. However, the valve unseats to permit a freer flow of ink during filling. For example, in Figure 6 of the drawing, a small annular spring loaded check valve 30 is interposed within a chamber 32 between the reservoir and the end 15b of the passage 15. The mouth of the passage 15b serves as a seat for the valve. The valve contains a very small orifice 31 therethrough which permits only a small amount of ink to flow from the reservoir to the pen nib for writing purposes. During filling, the nib is immersed in ink and the wall of the ink reservoir 14 is squeezed and released, thereby drawing ink through the nib and the ink passage 15 to the reservoir through the unseated valve 30. The pressure of the incoming ink causes the entire valve 30 to retract against the influence of a spring 33. The spring is wound on one end of the valve 30, which end is of somewhat lesser diameter than the end which abuts against the surface of a chamber or recess 32 in which the valve is accommodated. One end of the spring 33 is attached to and coiled around the valve, and the opposite bent'end thereof is embedded within the wall defining the ink reservoir. The bent end of the spring may be embedded in the said wall by heating the Wire end. Of course, the manner of mounting the spring within the reservoir is merely incidental.

Pens can be constructed according to the present invention in various attractive colors and combinations of colors, thereby imparting a very pleasing appearance to the pens.

The invention has been shown in preferred forms and by way of example only, and'obviously many variations and modifications may be made therein without departing from the spirit of the invention. The invention, therefore, is not to be limited to any specified form or embodiment, except in so far as such limitations are set forth in the claims.

I claim:

1. A fountain pen comprising a pen body made of semi-rigid resilient material, a nib and a nib holder at one end of the pen body, means formed integrally with the pen body defining a cavity within the pen body, means defining a passage within the pen body for conducting ink from the cavity to the nib, at least a part of said passage being in proximity to the outer surface of the pen body and separated from the outer surface by a relatively flexible wall, a raised formation on said outer surface near said flexible wall which, when de- :pressed, closes said passage to stop the flow of ink therethrough and a band encircling the pen body and engageable with the raised formation to close the passage.

2. A fountain pen comprising a semi-rigid resilient plastic pen body having a cavity formed therein at one end for the storage of a quantity of ink, said cavity being defined at least in part by a relatively thin wall, which may be pressed and released to draw ink into the cavity, a nib and nib holder at the opposite end of the pen body, a passage through said pen body between the cavity and the nib, said passage including at least a length thereof which is in proximity to the outer surface of the pen body, and adjustable means surrounding the pen body for applying pressure against said outer surface of the pen body to close said passage, thereby preventing the flow of ink from the reservoir to the nib.

3. A fountain pen comprising a pen body containing a cavity therein forming an ink reservoir, a nib and nib holder at one end of the pen body, a passage connecting the reservoir and the nib, and spring-urged valve means containing a restricted orifice therein to permit a limited flow of ink from the reservoir to the nib through the passage when in closed position and a more liberal flow of ink through said passage into the reservoir when in open position.

4. A fountain pen comprising a pen body, a nib and a nib holder at one end of the pen body, means formed integrally with the pen body defining a cavity within the pen body, means defining a passage within the pen body for conductingink from the hollow cavity to the nib, at least a part of said passage being in proximity to the outer surface of the pen body and separated from the outer surface by a relatively flexible wall, a raised formation on said outer surface which, when depressed, closes that passage to stop the fiow of ink therethrough, a ring pivotally mounted to the pen body from a position adjacent said raised formation to a position of engagement with said raised formation, and means forming a groove on said raised formation to hold said ring in engagement when it is pivoted to passage-closing position.

5.v A fountain pen comprising a pen body made of semi-rigid resilient material, a nib and a nib holder at one end of the pen body, means defining a cavity within the pen body, means defining a passage within the pen body. for conducting ink from the cavity to the nib, at

least a part of said passage being in proximity to the outer surface of the pen body and separated from the outer surface by a relatively flexible wall, a raised formation on said outer surface which, when depressed, closes said passage to stop the flow of ink therethrough, and a ring pivotally mounted to said pen body from a position adjacent said raised formation to a position of engagement with said raised formation.

6. A fountain pen comprising a pen body made of semi-rigid, resilient material containing a cavity therein forming an ink reservoir, a nib and nib holder at one end of the pen body, means forming a passage through the semi-rigid, resilient material of the pen body connecting the cavity and the nib, a raised formation on the outer surface of said pen body which when depressed collapses said passage to stop the flow of ink therethrough and means slidably coupled to and surrounding the pin body when the fountain pen is not in use to engage the raised formation and deform the pen body to collapse the passage.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 145,102 Hamilton Dec. 2, 1873 311,861 Tyrrell Feb. 3, 1885 673,451 Reisert May 7, 1901 1,155,611 Pierce Oct. 5, 1915 1,161,123 Gilbert Nov. 23, 1915 1,795,861 Johns Mar. 10, 1931 2,098,528 Andrews Nov. 9, 1937 2,304,229 Andrews Dec. 8, 1942 2,771,059 Miessner Nov. 20, 1956 FOREIGN PATENTS 22,469 Great Britain Nov. 20, 1894

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US145102 *Oct 25, 1873Dec 2, 1873 Improvement in fountain-pens
US311861 *Feb 3, 1883Feb 3, 1885 Fountain-pen
US673451 *Feb 7, 1899May 7, 1901Eduard ReisertFountain-pen.
US1155611 *Dec 17, 1913Oct 5, 1915Harry W PierceFountain-pen.
US1161123 *Aug 13, 1913Nov 23, 1915Justin GilbertFountain-pen.
US1795861 *Dec 20, 1926Mar 10, 1931Paul C MorelandReservoir fountain pen
US2098528 *May 23, 1936Nov 9, 1937Andrews Anatol NFountain pen valve
US2304229 *Jun 28, 1941Dec 8, 1942Anatol N AndrewsFountain pen construction
US2771059 *Apr 6, 1954Nov 20, 1956Miessner Benjamin FNon-flooding fountain pen
GB189422469A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7293931May 13, 2005Nov 13, 2007Bao Sheng CorporationEnhanced fluid dispenser container fitment
US7465474Jan 21, 2005Dec 16, 2008Bao Sheng CorporationApplying a polyolefin-bondable adhesive to polyolefin surface located on a structure, applying an epoxy bond material to structure, and applying a flocculent to structure; cosmetic brushes, liners for jewelry boxes; aesthetically pleasing; durable cushioned surfaces
US7614814Sep 5, 2006Nov 10, 2009Bao Sheng CorporationEnhanced fluid dispenser container fitment
Classifications
U.S. Classification401/186, 401/232, D19/51
International ClassificationB43K5/00, B43K5/04
Cooperative ClassificationB43K5/04
European ClassificationB43K5/04