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Publication numberUS2957253 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 25, 1960
Filing dateFeb 25, 1958
Priority dateFeb 25, 1958
Publication numberUS 2957253 A, US 2957253A, US-A-2957253, US2957253 A, US2957253A
InventorsJack Meltzer
Original AssigneeJack Meltzer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe provided with resiliently yieldable element
US 2957253 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. MELTZER Oct. 25; 1960 SHOE PROVIDED WITH RESILIENTLY YIELDABLE ELEMENT Filed Feb. 25, 1958 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR: JACK Mar-25A BY E Oct. 25, 1960 J. MELTZER 2,957,253

SHOE PROVIDED WITH RESILIENTLY YIELDABLE ELEMENT Filed Feb. 25, 1958 IN V EN TOR: JA CK MEL 1-2:?

4 Sheets-Sheet 2 1960 J. MELTZ-ER 2, 57,253 I SHOE PROVIDED wrm RESILIENTLY YIELDABLE ELEMENT Filed Feb. 25, 1958 V 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR: an ex MELTZEE Oct. 25, 1960 J. MELTZER 2,957,253

SHOE PROVIDED WITH RESILIENTLY YIELDABLE ELEMENT I Filed Feb. 25, 1958 4 Sheets-SheetA Tia. 14.

INVENTOR. Jac M54 726 2U BY V 1- United States Patent SHOE PROVIDED WITH RESILIENTLY YIELDABLE ELEMENT Jack Meltzer, 544 N. Laurel Ave., Hollywoed 48, Calif.

Filed Feb. 25, 1958, Ser. No. 717,445

14 Claims. (Cl. 3611.5)

The present invention relates generally to shoes, and has particular reference to the type of shoe in which the sole structure includes a sock lining, and in which there is at least one shoe element above the sock lining adapted to yield resiliently when the shoe is worn.

This is a continuation in part of my application for patent filed August 2, 1955, Serial No. 526,001 (now Patent No. 2,844,891), issued July 29, 1958.

One type of yieldable shoe element is exemplified by the elastic bridging piece that is sometimes used in the shank region to lie beneath the foot of the wearer and to exert a continuous resilient upward pressure upon the foot. The invention, as it relates to that type of yieldable shoe element, is claimed in the aforementioned application for patent. Other shoe elements of the resiliently yieldable type, to which the present application is more particularly directed, are straps adapted to extend around the foot when the shoe is worn, or thongs that extend upwardly from the forward part of the sole structure in certain types of shoes and lie between the toes of the foot. It is a general object of the invention to improve the appearance, wearing quality, and comfort of an article of footwear in which such yieldable elements are employed, either singly or in combinations.

A more specific object of the invention is to provide the desired yieldability by elastic means that are firmly anchored to the sole structure, yet do not impair the softness and attractive appearance of the exposed part of the sole structure. The invention is for this reason particularly useful in shoes of the presently fashionable kind in which a covered insole body is completely exposed except for relatively thin stripping or the like adapted to extend around the foot and constituting a skeleton type upper. It is this general type of footwear in connection with which the provision of resiliently yieldable shoe elements, such as bridging pieces and thongs and foot-enveloping straps are especially desirable.

The basic features of the new construction are applicable to a Wide variety of shoe styles, and the embodiments of the invention herein chosen for illustration are merely examples. As will be pointed out, the construction can be employed in shoes manufactured in accord ance with the Well-known slip-lasting process, if desired.

These general objectives and advantages can be achieved in the manner illustratively exemplified in the drawings, inwhich- Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a shoe embodying the features of this'invention;

Fig. 2 is an exploded view of some of the parts enteringinto the. construction of Fig. 1;

Fig; 3 is a plan view of the parts of Fig. 2 shown in partially completed assembly, one region of Fig. 3 being broken away to reveal the parts that lie beneath;

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of the parts shown in Figs. 2 and 3, at a.further stage of completion;

Fig. 5 is an enlargedcross-sectional view substantially on the line 5-5 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 6 is a cross-sectional view on the line 6-6 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 7 is a perspective view of some of the elements entering into a modified construction, shown in partially complete relationship;

Fig. 8 is an exploded view of the parts entering into the assembly of Fig. 7;

Fig. 9 is a bottom plan view of the assembly of Fig. 7, with the shields omitted;

Fig. 10 is a view similar to Fig. 9 with the shields in position;

Fig. 11 is an enlarged cross-sectional view along the line 1111 of Fig. 7;

Fig. 12 is a view similar to Fig. 11 illustrating a modification;

Fig. 13 is a fragmentary perspective view illustrating a slight modification in the construction shown in Fig. 2;

Fig. 14 is a view similar to Fig. 1, illustrating another modification;

Figs. 15-19 are perspective views depicting the steps that may be followed in forming a shoe of the kind shown in Fig. 14; and

Fig. 20 is a fragmentary view illustrating a slight modification in the procedural step represented in Fig. 15.

In the shoe I have chosen for illustration in Fig. 1 the sole structure consists of the inner sole 20, a Wedgie type heel 21, and an outer sole 22 (which may or may not be provided with the additional underlying outer heel 23). The collective assembly of elements 21, 22, 23 will be referred to hereinafter as an outer sole structure. Obviously this outer sole structure may be constituted of one or more elements other than those of the type shown.

The shoe of Fig. 1 includes a bridging piece 24 normally elevated above the level of the sock lining beneath it and constantly exerting an upward pressure on the foot of the wearer. The upper of the shoe illustrated consists of the so-called sling quarter or heel-engaging strap element 25, and a pair of straps 26 and 27 adapted to extend around the foot of the wearer.

The inner sole 20 consists essentially of an insole body and a sock lining that envelops it. The insole body 28 (Fig. 2) may consist of two or more layers of selected material, and I have chosen to show a bottom layer 29 of relatively thin but stiff material such as leather, fiber composition, or the like, and a relatively thick but resiliently soft upper layer 31} composed, for example, of foam rubber or the like. The insole body may include also a resiliently soft heel padding element 3? which is best shown in Fig. 5.

The covering for this insole element consists of a sock lining part 31 adapted to overlie and extend around the central and rear part of the insole body 28, and a for- Ward piece 32. The latter is of a size and shape to extend around the forward end of the insole body 28, and at the stepped regions 33 the piece 32 narrows and the rear part tapers as shown. This narrower tapered part of the element 32 constitutes the bridging piece 24 which, in the finished shoe, lies above and normally spaced from the sock lining 31. The rear end of the bridging piece 24, is stitched as at 34 to an elastic or stretchable member 35. The sock lining 31 is provided with a transverse aperture 36 having a length just sufiicient to permit the rear end of the bridging piece 24 to pass through it (see Fig. 3). The rear end of the stretchable member 35 is anchored to the sole structure by stitching it as shown at 37 to the insole body 28.

It is to be observed that the stretchable element 35 lies in its entirety beneath the sock lining 31. This is a feature of the invention because the exposed surface of the inner sole assembly is thus completely unmarred by the presence of extraneous unattractive material such as elastic ribbing or the like. Also the freedom of movement of the rear end of the bridging element 24 through the aperture 36 is reliable and sure.

The strap 25 is provided at one end with a stretchable member 40,- and this elastic also lies in its entirety beneath the sock lining. For this purpose the sock lining is provided, in addition to the transverse aperture 36, with a longitudinal relatively short aperture 41 adjacent to the side edge 42 of the sock lining. The extreme end of the stretchable member 40 is stitched at 43 .(Fig. 3) to the opposite side edge of the sole structure, and thestrap 25 extends upwardly through the aperture 41, loops around to define the desired heel-engaging sling, and has its opposite end 44 anchored in any suitable or desired manner beneath the inner sole 20, preferably being adhesively anchored or otherwise secured between the inner sole 20 and the underlying heel piece section 21 of the outer sole structure. Obviously, if desired, the end 44 of the strap 25 may be provided with elastic means similar to that shown at 40, and similarly anchored in position, but in most cases it is sutficient to have one end only of the strap 25 yieldably anchored.

The aperture 41 may be employed also to permit passage through it of one end of the strap 26, this end being stitched to a stretchable member 45 which lies in its entirety beneath the sock lining 31 and is secured to the insole body by stitching, as shown at 46 (Fig. 3).

A similar construction is employed to anchor the strap 27, one end of which is stitched to a stretchable member 47 that lies in its entirety beneath the sock lining 31. The strap 27 extends up through the sock lining through a longitudinal aperture 48 similar to the aperture 41 but adjacent to the opposite side edge of the sock lining. The elastic member 47 is stitched to the insole body at its end as indicated at 49 in Fig. 3.

The opposite or forward ends of the straps 26 and 27 may be anchored in position without benefit ofelasticity, in any desired manner, and I have found it suitable to secure these ends adhesively or otherwise in sandwiched relationship between the inner sole 20 and the outer sole element 22 of the outer sole structure.

The finished shoe is attractive in appearance and extremely comfortable and wearable, notwithstanding its skeleton-like upper. No ugly elastics are apparent. The top surface of the inner sole at its rear end is free of encumbrances, soft and comfortable. The strap 25 will cling to the heel of the foot of the wearer, more comfor'tably and more efficiently than any buckle or buckling arrangement could achieve. Similarly, the shoe is held to the forward part of the foot by the yieldably elastic straps 26, 27, coupled with the gentle upward pressure of the bridging piece 24.

As heretofore mentioned in connection with the elastic 35, the elastics 40, 45 and 47 may be anchored to the sock lining itself, as distinguished from the underlying insole body, but the construction illustrated is preferable in most cases. The anchorage to the sock lining itself may be expeditious where the shoe is constructed in accordance with slip-lasting procedures. 7

In Fig. 13 I have illustrated a construction in which the transverse aperture in the rear region of the sock lining (corresponding to the aperture 36 in Fig. 2) is formed by constructing the sock lining of two overlapping areas 50 and 51. By stitching the overlapping parts only partially, as indicated by the stitches at the sides 52 and 53, the unattached region between, designated 54, constitutes an aperture through which the rear end of the bridging element may extend. a 7

Under certain circumstances the yieldably resilient element can be advantageously extended downwardly not only through an aperture in the sock lining but through a registering aperture in the underlying insole body, the elastic means being disposed entirely in the region beneath the insole body. Such a construction is illustrated inFigs. 7-11, these illustrations showing also someadditional features oftheinvention; V e

The insole body may consist, as before, of a lower layer 55 and an upper soft layer 56 (Fig. 8). Overlying this insole body and enveloping it around its periphery is a sock lining 57 which, in this case, extends for the full length of the shoe in the form of a single piece of material. Near the heel region the sock lining is provided with a pair of spaced but aligned apertures 58 adjacent to one side edge of the sole structure, and with a similar pair of apertures 59 adjacent to the opposite side edge. In the medial part of the forward region a single longitudinal aperture is provided. In the insole body itself there are registering apertures 60a, 58a, and 594;.

The upper structure in this case consists of a single element 61 shaped to define downwardly extending straps 62 and 63 in the rear region, and a single downwardly extending thong 64 in the forward region. In each case, the strap ends are bifurcated, and each fork is secured to a length of stretchable elastic. The stretchable members 65, secured to the thong 64' are passed downwardly through the registering apertures 60 and 60a and then extend laterally in opposite directions as best indicated in Fig. 9. One of the stretchable members 65 is secured by stitching 66 to the insole body adjacent to one side edge thereof, and the other elastic 65 is similarly secured as at 67 to the opposite side edge.

Similarly the strap 62 is provided with stretchable members 68, and the strap 63 with elastic members 69. After being passed downwardly through the registering apertures 58 and 58a, the elastics are anchored as at 70 to one side edge of the sole structure (see Fig. 9), and in a similar fashion the stretchable members 69 are anchored to the opposite side edge as shown at 71.

In this construction, shielding strips 72 and 73 are laid over the elastics in the forward and rear regions of the assembly prior to the completion of the enveloping procedure. That is, the marginal parts of the sock lining 57 are not drawn around and adhesively secured in position, as shown in Fig. 10, until after the shielding pieces 72 and 73 have been laid in position. This prevents adhesive from interfering with the smooth stretching movements of the members 65, 68 and 69. Ohviously, if desired, the shields 72 and 73 may be merged in the form of a single shielding piece extending for the full length, or almost the full length, of the sole structure. Or, if desired, the shields may be omitted, but in that case special care must be taken during the pasting down of the sock lining margin, and during the application of the outer sole, to prevent adhesive from impairing the smooth functioning of the elastics.

The bifurcation of the thong 64 voids any one-sided downward pull upon the thong, and strengthens the anchorage. The bifurcation of each of the straps 62 and 63 fulfils a different purpose, in that the apertures in this region may be made shorter, and also the downward movements of the straps 62, 63 are limited in extent, being halted when the regions 74 and 75 encounter the 7 upper surface of the sock lining 57.

In Fig. 12 I have shown the possibility of modifying the construction by anchoring the elastics 65 (designated 65a in Fig. 12) to the sole body without extending the thong entirely through the sole body. In this case, the thong extends downwardly only through an aperture 60b in the sock lining 57a, and the thong ends and the elastics 65a are disposed in the space between the insole body and the sock lining. Under certain circumstances this modified construction may be desirable.

The modified shoe structure depicted in Figs. 1449 shows how a single elastic'may be used to impart resilient yieldability to either or both ends of a foot-engaging strap. The arrangement of elements in this embodiment of the invention also has other advantages of economy and simplicity. I 7

For illustrative purposes, the shoe of Fig. 14 comprises a covered insole body 76, preferably padded, a

.5 strap 77 adapted to extend around the foot of the wearer, a thong or equivalent foot-engaging element 78 that extends upwardly in the forward region of the shoe and is adapted to lie between the toes of the foot, and an outer sole structure which includes the outer sole layer 79, the Wedgie style heel 80, and the heel piece '81. The upper end of the shoe element 78 is engaged with the mid portion of the strap 77, and for this purpose the element may be looped, as shown, so that the strap 77 passes slidably through this loop. Other ways of engaging the parts 77, 78 may be resorted to, and they might be made of one piece, if desired, as in Fig. 7.

It will be observed that both of the ends of the strap 77 extend around the side edges of the covered insole body 76 into a concealed disposition between the insole body and the outer sole structure. Thus, apertures such as those shown at 41 and 48 in Figs. 1 and 4 are absent, and the upper surface of the insole body is entirely smooth and continuous in this region of the shoe. This enhances the attractive appearance of the shoe. At the same time, the strap 77 is anchored in the highly desirable resiliently yieldable manner, and the structure that achieves this result is of the utmost simplicity, is reliably eifective in operation, and lends itself readily to the imparting of the elastic yieldability to either or both of the strap ends. The shoe element 78 is similarly anchored in a resilient yieldable manner.

The structure shown may be assembled in the manner indicated in Figs. l5-19, and it should be noted that the entire operation may be performed off the last, except for the final application of the outer sole structure which takes only a brief period of time.

A suitable soft insole body is first formed, consisting for example of a relatively stifi layer 82 adhesively bonded to a correspondingly shaped body 83 of relatively soft yieldable material. These elements are similar to those hereinbefore described in connection with Figs. l-ll. Before covering this insole body, the strap 77 is secured to its under side, i.e., the side on which the layer 82 is, shown uppermost in Fig. 15. The strap ends are stitched or otherwise secured to the opposite ends of a stretchable elastic 84, and a part of this elastic is stitched or otherwise secured to the insole body. Where both ends of the strap 77 are ultimately to have elastic stretchability, the mid portion of the elastic 84 is secured, as by stitching 85 (Fig. to the insole body.

Then the insole body is covered. For this purpose a suitably shaped sock lining 86 is applied, as indicated in Fig. 16, its margin 87 being of sufficient extent to allow it to be wrapped around and thus to envelope the edges of the insole body. The margin 87 is caused to be held down adhesively all around, except that at the extreme forward end of the sole the margin is temporarily left unattached, as indicated at 88.

The strap 77 is then brought around to the other face of the shoe, as indicated in'Fig. 17, and the shoe element or thong 78 is engaged with its mid portion. The sole assembly is then pierced by a suitable tool at the point from which the element 78 is to rise. This forms an aperture 89 in the sock lining (Fig. 17) and analigned hole 90 in the insole body (Fig. 18). The lower end of the element 78 is then inserted downwardly through this passage, and secured to the edge of the insole body by a stretchable elastic 91. As will be noted in Fig. 18, the elastic 91 lies in its entirety in a horizontal disposition against the under-face of the insole body. One end of the elastic 91 is stitched or otherwise fastened to the lower end of the thong 78, and the other end of the elastic 91 is stitched or otherwise fastened to the insole body, preferably at its extreme front edge, as shown. In performing the last-mentioned operation it is preferable that the wrapper or sock lining be momentarily held back so that no stitches or fasteners extend through it on either face of the insole.

A protective shield 92 (Fig. 19) in the form of a suit- 6 ably shaped piece of material is laid over the elastic '91 and the unattached part of the sock lining margin 87-is then brought around to cover the edge of the shield 92, and is caused to be adhesively held in place as shown in Fig. 19.

A similar protective shield 93 of appropriate shape is then laid over the elastic 84, and the assembly is then ready to have the outer sole structure applied. This is achieved in known manner and involves the application of adhesive to the juxtaposed surfacesof the covered insole body and the outer sole structure. The shields 92 and 93 prevent adhesive from coming in contact with the elastics, thus maintaining them in freely stretchable isolation.

In Fig. 20 I have shown how the elastic 84 may if desired be secured to the insole body by stitches 94 lying at one end of the elastic instead of at its mid portion. This results in imparting resilient yieldability to one of the ends of strap 77 (the one at the top in Fig. 20) and not to the other. Under certain circumstances it may be desirable to anchor the opposite strap ends in this asymmetrical way. The other procedural steps, as indicated in Figs. 16-19, remain the same whether the elastic is fastened as in Fig. 15 or as in Fig. 20.

It will be understood that some of the features described and illustrated in connection with Figs. 1-6 may be incorporated in shoes of the kind indicated in Figs. 7-20, and vice versa. Many variations in style and design are obviously possible, while still employing some or all of the basic features of the invention. In general it will be understood that many of the details herein de scribed and illustrated may be modified by those skilled in the art without necessarily departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as expressed in the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a shoe, a sole structure comprising an insole body and a sock lining overlying it, said sock lining having a marginal part extending around and enclosing the edges of the insole body and secured to the underside of said body, said sock lining having an aperture therein, a foot-engaging element extending movably through said aperture, the upper end of said element being adapted to engage the upper surface of the foot of a wearer, a stretchable elastic lying in its entirety even when stretched in a substantially horizontal concealed position within said sole structure, one end of said elastic being secured to the lower end of said foot-engaging element, the opposite end of said elastic being anchored to an edge portion of the sole structure, said elastic being freely stretchable relative to the sole structure whereby said foot-engaging element is adapted to yield resiliently when the shoe is worn.

In a shoe, the elements defined in claim 1, said sock lining aperture being adjacent to one edge thereof, said foot-engaging element being adapted to extend around the foot of the wearer, said element having its opposite ends anchored to the sole structure, one of said ends extending downwardly through said aperture and said stretchable elastic connecting said end to a relatively remote edge portion of the sole structure.

3. In a shoe, the elements defined in claim 1, said sock lining aperture being closely adjacent to one side edge of the sole structure, said foot-engaging element being a strap adapted to extend around the foot of the wearer and having one end extending downwardly and movable through said aperture and the other end anchored to the sole structure at the opposite side edge thereof, and said stretchable elastic extending in a generally transverse direction across the sole structure.

4. In a shoe, the elements defined in claim 1, said sock lining aperture being closely adjacent to one side edge of the sole structure, said foot-engaging element being one of a plurality of straps adapted to extend around 7 T 7 I the foot of the wearer, each strap having its opposite ends anchored to the sole structure, one end of each strap 6 extending downwardly and movably through said aper- --ture and being anchored to the sole structure by a stretchable elastic of the character described.

' 5. In a shoe, the assembly of elements defined in yclaim 1, said elastic lying between the sock lining and *the insole body. e 7 6.In a shoe, the assembly of elements defined in claim 1, said insole body having an aperture in registry with said sock lining aperture and said foot-engaging elejment extending through both apertures, said elastic lying in; its entiretybeneath said insole body, there being also an outer sole, and a protective shield lying between said 'finsole body and outer sole and covering said elastic to 1 maintain the latterfin freelystretchable isolation.

-' 7. In1a shoe, the elements defined in claim 1, there bef ;ing also an outer jsolestructure secured to and underlying said insole body, a foot-engaging strap adapted to extend around the foot of the wearer, the opposite ends of said curing said strap ends to the insole body and effective to secure at least one of said ends in a resiliently yieldable manner, said last-mentioned anchoring means including a stretchable elastic lying in its entirety even when stretched in a permanently concealedhorizontal disposition beneath'said insole body, and protective shielding lying between said insole body and said outer; sole structure and covering said elastics to maintain the latter in freely stretchable isolation. I

8. In a shoe, the elements defined in claim 1, there being also an'outer sole structure securedtoand underlying said insole body, a foot-engaging strap adapted to extend around the foot of the wearer, the opposite ends of said strap extending around the side edges of the covered insole body into concealed disposition between the insole body and the outer sole structure, a second stretchable elastic lying in its entirety even when stretched in a permanently concealed horizontal disposition beneath said insole body, said second elastic being secured to and extending between said strap ends, and means securing a part of said second elastic to-said insole body whereby at least one of said strap ends is anchored to the insole body in a resiliently yieldable manner. a a 9. In a shoe, the structure defined in claim 8, wherein said last-mentioned elastic is secured only atits midportion to the insole body so that both of said strap ends are elastically anchored. 1

10. In a shoe, a sole structure including an inner sole and an outer sole and a sock lining enveloping the inner sole in at least the rear region thereof, said sock lining having an aperture therein, said inner sole having a registering aperture therein, a foot-engaging element above the sock lining adapted to yield resiliently when the'shoe is worn, said element having a concealed end extending downwardly and movably through said registering apertures, elastic'rneans entirely beneath said inner sole and extending between said concealed end and an edge portion of the sole structure and anchored to the latter, and a protective shield lying between said elastic means and the. outer sole to maintain said elastic means in freely stretchable isolation. I

11. In a shoe, a sole structure including a sock lining and an underlying insole body, said sock lining having ture, a strap extending through said registering apertures having an upper end adapted to lie betweenthe toes of the wearer and a concealed lower end lying beneath said finsole body, and elastic means lying in its entirety beneath said insole body and interposed between said con- 7 cealed end and a remote edge portion of the sole structure. Y l

1 .:In a shoe, the combination of parts defined in claim 11, the concealed end of said'strap being bifurcated, said elastic means comprising a stretchable element connecting one forlc to one sideedge of the sole structure and another stretchable element connectingthe other fork to the other side edge: A

. 3. In a shoe, an insole body, a sock lining covering it and having a marginalpartextendingaround and enveloping the edges of the insole body, anouter sole structure secured to and underlying said insole body, said sock lining having an aperture init, said insole body having a hole through it in alignment withsaid aperture, a foot-engaging element extending'movably through said hole and aperture, the upper endlof said element being adapted to extend upwardly between'the toes of the foot of'the wearer, a'stretchable elastic lying in its entirety in a permanently concealed horizontal disposition beneath said insole body, said elastic having oneend secured to 1 the lower end of said foot-engaging element and the other end secured to an edge of the insole body, said lastnamed end lying between the insole body and the enveloping margin of the sock lining, and a protective shield lying between said insolebody and said-outer sole structure and covering said elastic to maintain the'latter in freely stretchable isolation, the margin of said shield also lying between the insole body and the enveloping marof said strap extending around the side edges of the insole body into concealed disposition between the insole body and the outer sole structure, anchoring means securing said ends to the insole body and effective to secure at least one of said ends in a. resiliently yieldable manner, said anchoring. means including. a stretchable elastic which also lies in its entirety ina permanently concealed horizontal disposition beneath said. insole body, and a protective shield between said. last-named elastic and the outer sole structure, the upper end of said first mentioned foot-engaging elementbeing in engagement with the midportion of said strap.

References Citedin the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Great Britain. Dec. 18, 1930

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1989613 *Mar 3, 1933Jan 29, 1935Daniel Green CompanyShoe
US2317870 *Sep 15, 1941Apr 27, 1943Philip WeinstatShoe
US2491297 *Jan 27, 1948Dec 13, 1949Brown Virginia SFootwear
US2526940 *Dec 20, 1948Oct 24, 1950Joseph FelloSandal with strap-receiving, channeled sole
US2724913 *May 19, 1955Nov 29, 1955Russell Tbyra ASandal construction
US2732634 *Jun 16, 1953Jan 31, 1956 Lipton
US2740207 *Feb 21, 1952Apr 3, 1956Med I Peds IncMedicated shoes
GB191172A * Title not available
GB339919A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3063166 *Jun 14, 1960Nov 13, 1962Sigmund SpiegelSandal
US4267649 *May 7, 1979May 19, 1981Smith Gardner MInterchangeable shoe
US5454382 *Mar 10, 1992Oct 3, 1995Johnson & Johnson Orthopaedics, Inc.Orthopaedic cast soles
US5960565 *Mar 4, 1997Oct 5, 1999Lochbaum; KennethAdjustable aquatic exercise shoe
US7162814 *Aug 4, 2004Jan 16, 2007David BergShoe with interchangeable strap system
US8322054Jul 7, 2009Dec 4, 2012Craig FellerShoe with interchangeable strap system
US20050039344 *Aug 4, 2004Feb 24, 2005David BergShoe with interchangeable strap system
US20070186443 *Feb 13, 2007Aug 16, 2007Berg David GShoe with interchangeable strap system
US20100000127 *Jul 7, 2009Jan 7, 2010Craig FellerShoe with interchangeable strap system
USD612588Jan 8, 2009Mar 30, 2010Craig FellerBand for a shoe
USD613490Jul 7, 2008Apr 13, 2010Craig FellerStrap for a shoe
USD615737Jan 8, 2009May 18, 2010Craig FellerShoe
USD619340Oct 12, 2009Jul 13, 2010Craig FellerShoe
USD670893May 18, 2011Nov 20, 2012Bandals International, Inc.Shoe
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/11.5, 36/58.5, 36/170
International ClassificationA43B3/12
Cooperative ClassificationA43B3/126
European ClassificationA43B3/12L