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Publication numberUS2958435 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 1, 1960
Filing dateDec 16, 1957
Priority dateDec 16, 1957
Publication numberUS 2958435 A, US 2958435A, US-A-2958435, US2958435 A, US2958435A
InventorsHartzell H Schmidgall
Original AssigneeHartzell H Schmidgall
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for handling concrete pipe and the like
US 2958435 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 1, 1960 H. H. SCHMIDGALL APPARATUS FOR HANDLING CONCRETE PIPE AND THE LIKE Filed Dec. 16, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG.I

INVENTOR. H. H. SCHMIDGALL ATTORNEY! Nov. 1, 1960 H. H. SCHMIDGALL 2,953,435

APPARATUS FOR HANDLING CONCRETE PIPE AND THE LIKE Filed Dec. 16, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. H. H. SCHMIDGALL BY I a ////i I.

ATTORNEY Nov. 1, 1960 H. H. SCHMIDGALL 2,958,435

APPARATUS FOR HANDLING CONCRETE PIPE AND THE LIKE Filed D ec. 16, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 FIG.5

INVENTOR. H. H. SCHMIDGALL ATTORNEY Nov. 1, 1960 H. H. SCHMIDGALL 2,958,435

APPARATUS FOR HANDLING CONCRETE PIPE AND THE LIKE Filed Dec. 16, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 FIG.8

FIG.9

ATTORNEY United Stat atent O f APPARATUS FOR HANDLING CONCRETE PIPE AND THE LIKE Hartzell H. Schmidgall, Mediapolis, Iowa Filed Dec. 16, 1957, Ser. No. 703,168

18 Claims. (Cl. 214652) This invention relates to the art of materials handling and more particularly to the handling of relatively large hollow articles such as concrete pipe and the like commonly used in sewer lines, drains, culverts, etc.

Pipe of this character is manufactured by a casting or molding process and is conventionally produced in relatively large diameters, in the range of twelve to thirtysix inches and larger and in proportionate lengths on the order of twenty-four to forty-eight inches and even longer, the foregoing being given as representative and typical but not exclusive. The casting process involves a groundor floor-supported pallet which includes or supports a circular forming ring which in turn coaxially supports an upright double-walled mold into which concrete is introduced at the top. The purpose of the bottom ring is to form on the pipe an annular internal groove cooperative in tongue-and-groove fashion with the annular tongue of a similar length when the pipe lengths are assembled in use. A top ring is added to the mold in the casting process and forms the annular mating tongue.

Because of the fact that the pipe is cast in an upright position, various problems arise in storing, yarding, loading and otherwise handling same. The pipe is inherently of relatively substantial weight, approaching hundreds of pounds, depending upon its size, and therefore must be handled with mechanized power equipment. The initial problem is to turn the upright pipe on its side, since in that position it is more easily rolled, stacked, loaded and transported, but the pipe cannot be simply toppled from its upright position because of the extreme likelihood of subjecting it to fracture. The prior art abounds with many examples of mechanized apparatus for turning the pipe from an upright to a horizontal position but these in the main operate on the principle of gripping the pipe externally and rotating it to a horizontal position. Such gripping devices interfere with pipe already stacked, are thus difiicult to maneuver and are relatively costly because of power requirements, complexity and maintenance requirements.

Experience has shown that, fundamentally, such pipe is fairly easily handled by yard or warehouse vehicles of the type commonly called fork lift trucks which feature a design having a fork or tine means insertable into the open end of a horizontal length of pipe and elevated to support the pipe in a transport position, and after the pipe is stacked or loaded in that position the fork may be withdrawn and the truck used to pick up and carry another length and so on. However, as already indicated, the problem is to turn the pipe to a horizontal position so that such truck may be more readily and easily used.

A principal object of the present invention is to afford a solution to that problem by means of a simple and novel apparatus, preferably as an attachment for a conventional fork lift truck, whereby the power source ice on such truck, plus already present components on the truck, is used to initially turn the pipe to a horizontal position. It is a feature of the invention to provide means whereby the pipe is handled largely via its interior surface, thus eliminating external grippers and the like that interfere with speed and efiiciency.

A still further object resides in the use of a temporary external pipe-engaging means which may be cleared from the pipe after the pipe is horizontally supported by the fork or tine means on the truck or equivalent mobile support. Basically, it is a principal object to provide apparatus for causing the pipe to topple toward a horizontal position, in combination with means for intercepting the toppling or overbalanced pipe and means for causing the pipe to assume a horizontal position in which it may be carried by the mobile support. A further feature resides in the use of articulated arm means, preferably hydraulically controlled, for accomplishing control of the pipe as it is turned from its upright position, together with means for indicating to the operator the relative positions of components of the articulated means so that the operator may more easily operate and maneuver the apparatus. The invention features also adjustability of the apparatus so as to adapt it to pipe of various sizes, economy and simplicity of construction and design, low initial cost and ease of maintenance.

The foregoing and other important objects and desirable features inherent in and encompassed by the invention will become apparent as a presently preferred embodiment thereof is disclosed, by Way of example, in the ensuing description and accompanying sheets of drawings, the several figures of which are described below,

Figure 1 is a fragmentary plan view of the apparatus in a starting position relative to an upright length of. pipe.

Figure 2 is a side view of the same, further illustrating in dot-dash lines a preliminary position of one of the components of the articulated arm means, and also illustrating a lower portion of the pipe in section.

Figures 3, 4, 5 and 6 are also side elevations showing different stages in the operation of the apparatus, several of the components being shown schematically in the interests of clarity.

Figure 7 is a fragmentary end view as seen along the line 7-7 of Figure 5.

Figure 8 is an enlarged view, partly in section, as seen along the line 88 of Figure 5.

Figure 9 is a schematic diagram of a representative hydraulic circuit for controlling the articulated arm means.

The numeral 20 designates the forward portion of any well known power vehicle such as the conventional fork lift truck, the details of which are so well known as to require but little further description.

The front part of this vehicle or truck has a rigid upright support 22 in the form of channels affording a track for vertically movably carrying lift means 24 having a forwardly projecting time means or fork 26. Since the truck is wheeled as shown, the support 22 may be considered mobile and as such is movable toward and away from an upright length of pipe C; that is, the pipe is supported in an initial upright position with the axis of its cylindrical section vertical. The pipe is shown in a condition in which the mold has been removed or stripped and the pipe thus stands on its bottom end 28 via a combined bottom forming ring and pallet 33. This ring has legs or blocks 32 which afford a space between it and the ground for the insertion of the tine means or fork 26 as the truck is driven forwardly. At this point it is to be observed that such expressions as forwardly,

front, etc., are used as a matter of convenience and as typical of the preferred operation of the apparatus, rather than as terms of limitation.

Further, practice of the invention lends itself readily to its adaptation to basic methods to a large extent and such basic methods involve the handling of the pipe, at least in preliminary stages, with the bottom or pallet ring 39 in place. Accordingly, the present disclosure will so proceed, but it should be understood that the definition of the bottom end of the upright pipe includes the bottom end with or without the pallet ring 36, since it is obvious that the same principles are applicable. The presence of the ring does however assure protection of the end of the pipe against chipping during handling. This ring is of course eventually removed.

As already indicated, the purpose of the pallet ring 30, in addition to serving as a temporary stand for the upright pipe, is to form on this end of the pipe an internal annular groove, such as at 34. A top ring, not shown, is included in the mold to form an annular tongue 36 at the top end of the pipe which mates with the groove of another length of pipe when the pipe is assembled end to end. This is of course conventional and is offered here merely as background.

As a further observation, the invention, although designed especially for the handling of concrete pipe, is not necessarily limited thereto. Hence, the terms concrete, pipe," etc., are likewise terms of convenience and not of limitation.

The lift means 24, along with the fork 26, is vertically movable in the track afforded by the support by whatever conventional power means, not shown but inherent, forming part of the truck or vehicle 20. As will be brought out, vertical movement of the fork is employed in tipping, supporting and transporting the pipe.

The upper part of the support 22 carries forwardly extending first arm means 38, here a pair of rigid arms 40 spaced apart laterally to straddle the pipe. The spacing of the arms is preferably sufficient to accommodate pipe of diameters greater than that shown. These arms are rigidly cross-connected at their rear ends by a transverse shaft 42 which is journalled in the upper part of the support channels to afford a transverse pivot about which the arms may swing among their various positions, and the shaft serves to compel these arms to move in unison. Power means for selectively swinging the arm means 38 is afforded by a two-way hydraulic motor 44 under control of a suitable valve V (Figure 9) which may be conveniently located on the lift truck 20 adjacent to the conventional controls therefor. These details are not material to the present invention.

The arrn means 38 serves as a movable extension of the main support 22 and as such carries second arm means 46, here comprising a pair of fore-and-aft arm elements 48 pivoted at their rear ends respectively to the front ends of the arms 40 by transversely coaxial pivot pins 50. The arm means 46 is thus selectively swingable with as well as relative to the arm means 38 as part of the articulated system for controlling the handling of the pipe, and the power means for this purpose entails the use of a pair of two-way hydraulic motors 52 connected together in parallel and operated by a suitable valve V A representative circuit appears in Figure 9, wherein the use of conventional components is deemed to dispense with a detailed description. The two cylinders 52 are used here as an expedient to cause the arms 48 to move in unison, because a cross shaft instead of the pivots 50 would interfere with the pipe.

As best seen in Figure 2, the fork or tine means 26 is inserted beneath the bottom ring 30 and thus at the bottom end of the upright pipe, and the extent of the insertion is controlled so that the terminal end of the fork, at 54, is clear of the inner peripheral portion 56 of the pipe most remote from the truck 20. In this case, the portion 56 may be considered the front diametrical portion. The fork carries a stop or block 53 adapted to engage the rear outer diametrical portion 60 of the bottom of the pipe, thus controlling the amount of insertion. The stop block is here shown as being mounted on the fork by removable means such as a bolt 62 so that the block may be removed and replaced in a different position for accommodating pipe of different diam eter. Provision for one such other position is made here by a second bolt hole 64 in the fork so that the block may occupy a position rearwardly of that shown. In the present disclosure, the pipe shown has a diameter of twenty-four inches, and if the block 58 is set in its rear position by use of the bolt 62 and bolt hole 64, thirtysix inch pipe can be accommodated. Obviously, on the basis of what is set forth above, multiplication of stop positions is within the scope of the present invention and other ways of achieving adjustability will readily occur to those versed in the art.

In view of the manner in which the pipe is engaged from below as described above, and particularly since the free or terminal end 54 of the fork clears the pipe or ring 30 at 56, the pipe will tip forwardly as the fork is raised (Figure 3) fulcruming about its forward portion on the ground and being lifted and fulcruming at its rear portion on the fork ahead of the stop 58. The amount of tipping depends of course on the height to which the fork is raised, until the pipe simply overbalances forwardly (Figure 4), which is readily possible because the inside diameter of the pipe at 56 continues to clear the free or front end 54 of the fork.

For reasons already described, it is undesirable to allow the pipe simply to fall to a horizontal position, and therefore the apparatus includes means for intercepting the pipe short of its horizontal position (Figure 4), together with means for ultimately achieving such horizontal position (Figure 5 and finally enabling the pipe to be carried solely by the fork 26 (Figure 6) so that it may be stacked, loaded, transported or yarded and the fork subsequently withdrawn.

The means for intercepting the pipe as it topples forwardly comprises a combination of the arm means 46 and pipe-engaging means 66 carried thereby. In the present case the latter means takes the form of a flexible element or chain 68 cross-connecting the arms 48 and biased by tension springs 70 to the form or shape shown in Figure 1. The springs will yield as the chain accepts the pipe to assume the cradle form of Figure 7. Hence, the means 66 may be considered cradle means. The springs also function to draw the chain lengthwise of the pipe as from the position of Figure 4 to that of Figure 5 and when the weight of the pipe is transferred entirely to the fork 26 and the arm means are properly manipulated (Figure 6), the springs will cause the chain to again assume its receiving or starting shape as shown in Figure 1 so that when the arm means 46 is raised the chain will clear the front end of the fork-carried horizontal pipe. These and other features will be covered below in the description of the operation of the apparatus.

The fork 26, though limited by the stop 58 as to insertion beneath the upright pipe, is nevertheless long enough to support the horizontal pipe independently of the cradle means 66. Hence, means must be availed of to automatically overcome the effect of the stop 53 after it has served its purpose. This result is best visualized in Figures 3, 4 and 8. Figure 3 shows that the stop is still effective as the pipe begins to tip forwardly, and Figure 4 shows the rear portion 60 of the pipe clearing the stop. Figure 8 shows that the width of the fork 26 is such that its transverse dimension chords across the inside diameter of the pipe (or ring 30), and the stop 58 is of such height as to escape the subtending arc.

A further feature of the invention is means for indicating to the operator the positions of the arm means 38 and 46. This means is shown somewhat schematically in the drawings for the benefit of the reader, but it is clear that the principles are disclosed and will afiord basis for suitable commercial design. For example, the dials, etc. to be presently described may be readily arranged to face the operator on the truck.

The position of the arm means 38 may be read on a dial segment 72 affixed to an upper part of the support 22 in conjunction with a pointer 74 aflixed to and movable with the arm means 38. When the arm means 38 pivots about the axis of the shaft 42, the pointer 74 sweeps over the dial segment 72. The left hand pivot 50 for the arm element 48 is extended as a stub shaft and is rigid with the associated arm element 48, and a sprocket 76 is keyed to this shaft. A second sprocket 78 is journaled on an extension of the left hand end of the rear pivot shaft 42, and a drive chain 80 connects the two sprockets. A dial 82 is coaxially fixed to the sprocket 78 and is read on an index mark or pointer 84 preferably painted on or otherwise afiixed to the support 22. When the arm means 46 pivots about the axis of the stub shafts 50, the sprocket 76 turns and drives the sprocket 78 via the chain 80. Since the dial 82 is fixed to the sprocket 78, it turns relative to the fixed index 84. The dial 82 and segment 72 are appropriately marked with indicia to be read against their respective pointers. For example, the segment 72 may have index marks 86 for start (Figure 2), 88 for tip (Figure 3), 90 for carry (Figures 4 and 5), and 92 for clear (Figure 6). The dial has marks 94, 96, 98 and 100 respectively for start, tip, carry and clear. Additional indicia (not shown) may be provided for pipe of different diameters.

Operation As previously described, the pipe C stands upright on its bottom end as represented by the ring 30 and the mold (not shown) is removed. After an appropriate interval for at least adequate setting of the concrete, the fork lift truck 20, with its fork lowered, is driven forwardly and the fork enters beneath the bottom of the pipe to the extent defined by the stop 58 as it engages the rear bottom of the pipe at 60. The arm means 38 and 46 will be in their start positions (full lines, Fig. 2). The valve V is opened to contract the cylinders 52 so as to swing the arm means 46 downwardly through a preliminary position (broken lines, Figure 2) to its tip position (Figure 3) and the valve is closed to retain this position. The valve V is operated, when the pipe is as tall as that shown here, to cause the motor or cylinder 44 to incur the tip position of the arm means 38 so as to raise the chain above the center of the height of the pipe. With shorter pipe, the arm means 38 need not be elevated. The fork is then elevated and the pipe tips forwardly (Figure 3), received in and supported by the spring-loaded cradling chain 68. At this point, it should be observed that as the arm means 46 passes through the broken line position of Figure 1 to its ultimate tip position, the chain 68 is conformed to the pipe so as to eliminate any possibility of the pipe tipping to one side or the other, it having been previously noted that the spacing of the arms 48 and 40 is enough to accommodate pipe of larger diameter than that shown. This retaining feature of the means 66 is an added advantage afforded by the invention.

As the fork 26 continues to rise, the pipe is tipped further forwardly and the rear end portion thereof at 60 clears the stop block 58 (Figures 4 and 8) and the pipe slides gently rearwardly on the fork while still suspended at its front position by the means 66, and at the same time or just prior thereto the arm means 38 and 46 are moved to their respective carry positions (Figure 4). At this time, the chain 68 will of course assume a forward position on the pipe and the pipe is carried in part by both the means 66 and the fork 26, ultimately sliding rearwardly to the position of Figure 5.

It is significant and desirable that the fork 26 is long enough to carry the pipe without the aid of the means 66 and for that reason should have a length at least equal to slightly more than one half the height or length of the pipe so that the greater portion of the mass of the horizontally supported pipe is rearward of the tip of the fork. As a safety feature, the design of the arm means and cradle chain is such that in the carry position (Figure 5), the chain 68 will be ahead of the center of mass of the pipe. The chain will tend to remain in this position despite the springs 70 because of frictional engagement with the pipe.

When the arm means 38 and 46 are moved downwardly to their clear" positions (Figure 6), support of the pipe depends wholly on the fork and the chain is freed of engagement with the pipe and the springs 70 return the chain to its open form (Figure 1). Hence, as the arm means 46 is swung upwardly about its pivots 50, the chain will easily clear the front end of the pipe. This function is of course one of disengaging the pipe-engaging or cradle means from the pipe so that the arm means does not interfere with stacking the pipe along with other pipes already horizontally positioned. As indicated in broken lines in Figure 6, the two arm means have upward and rearward ranges of movement greater than those needed for controlling the pipe and as such may be literally folded out of the way for use of the truck 20 for yarding and other purposes. If desired, the cylinders 44 and 52 may be detached to enable folding to a greater degree. When the cradle means: 66 is cleared of the pipe, and the pipe is stacked, loaded or otherwise situated, the fork may be lowered slightly and the truck 20 backed to withdraw the fork from the pipe.

The several salient features of the invention, a preferred design thereof and the manner of using same have been covered somewhat in detail, but it will be understood that other attributes will be recognized by those versed in the art, as will variations in and substitutions for the structure disclosed, all of which may be achieved without departure from the spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for turning a length of concrete pipe or the like from an initial upright position standing on its bottom end to a horizontal position lying on one side, comprising: a support movable forwardly toward and rearwardly away from the upright pipe; vertically movable lift means on the support and having forwardly pro jecting tine means having a width less than the diameter of the pipe and insertable forwardly beneath the bottom end of the pipe to an extent in which the free end of the tine means is short of the forward edge portion of the bottom end of the pipe so that upon elevation of the lift and tine means the tine means will engage only the diametrically opposed rear edge portion of said bottom end as a fulcrum and the upright pipe will overbalance forwardly; first arm means connected to and extending forwardly from an upper part of the support; second arm means pivoted on a transverse axis to the first arm means and having pipe-engaging means thereon adapted tointercept and temporarily support the forwardly overbalanced pipe short of a horizontal position; and means for swinging the second arm means about said transverse axis to lower the pipe via said pipe-engaging means to a horizontal position in which the pipe extends horizontally while supported by the elevated tine means and said pipe-engaging means, and said means for swinging the second arm means being operative to swing said second arm means upwardly to free the pipe-engaging means from the horizontal pipe so that the tine means may be rearwardly withdrawn from said horizontal pipe.

2. The invention defined in claim 1, in which: the first arm means is connected to said upper part of the support via a transverse pivot; and separate means is provided for swinging said first arms about said transverse pivot to 7 facilitate positioning of the second arm means and the pipe-engaging means.

3. The invention defined in claim 1, in which: the pipeengaging means comprises a cradle element positionable initially ahead of and engageable with the outside surface of the upright pipe.

4. The invention defined in claim 3, in whcih: the second arm means comprises a pair of arm elements spaced apart laterally to straddle the pipe; and the cradle element cross-connects said arm elements.

5. The invention defined in claim 4, in which: the cradle means comprises a flexible element connected at opposite ends respectively to the arm elements; and biasing means is connected between the arm elements and the flexible element to initially shape and position the flexible element to receive the pipe, said biasing means being yieldable to enable the flexible element to conform to the shape of the pipe when the weight of the pipe is applied to said flexible element.

6. The invention defined in claim 1, in which: the tine means has a length greater than half the length of the pipe so that when the pipe-engaging means is disengaged from the horizontal pipe the pipe is supported horizontally solely by the elevated tine means; stop means is provided on and projects upwardly from the tine means and engageable with the rear edge portion of the bottom of the pipe to limit initial insertion of the tine means heneath the upright pipe to the aforesaid extent; and said stop means being of relatively low height so that when the pipe overbalances forwardly the upper arc of the rear edge portion of the pipe is higher than and thus escapes the stop means whereby the overbalanced pipe slides rearwardly on the tine means.

7. The invention defined in claim 1, including: indicator means movable on the support and operatively connected to the second arm means to indicate the positions of said second arm means in swinging about its pivot axis to the first arm means.

8. Apparatus for turning a length of concrete pipe or the like from an initial upright position standing on its bottom end to a horizontal position lying on one side, comprising: a support movable forwardly toward and rearwardly away from the upright pipe; vertically movable lift means on the support and having forwardly projecting tine means having a width less than the diameter of the pipe and insertable forwardly beneath the bottom end of the pipe to an extent in which the free end of the tine means is short of the forward edge portion of the bottom end of the pipe so that upon elevation of the lift and tine means the tine means will engage only the diametrically opposed rear edge portion of said bottom end as a fulcrum and the upright pipe will overbalance forwardly; arm means pivoted on a transverse axis to the support and having pipe-engaging means thereon adapted to intercept and temporarily support the forwardly overbalanced pipe short of a horizontal position; and means for swinging the arm means about said transverse axis to lower the pipe via said pipe-engaging means to a horizontal position in which the pipe extends horizontally while supported by the elevated tine means and said pipe-engaging means, and said means for swinging the arm means being operative to swing said arm means upwardly to free the pipeengaging means from the horizontal pipe so that the tine means may be rearwardly withdrawn from said horizontal pipe.

9. The invention defined in claim 8, in which: the pipeengaging means comprises a cradle element positionable initially ahead of and engageable with the outside surface of the upright pipe.

10. The invention defined in claim 9, in which: the arm means comprises a pair of arm elements spaced apart laterally to straddle the pipe; and the cradle element cross-connects said arm elements.

11. The invention defined in claim 10, in which: the cradle means comprises a flexible element connected at opposite ends respectively to the arm elements; and biasing means is connected between the arm elements and the flexible element to initially shape and position the flexible element to receive the pipe, said biasing means being yieldable to enable the flexible element to conform to the shape of the pipe when the weight of the pipe is applied to said flexible element.

12. Apparatus for turning a length of concrete pipe or the like from an initial upright position standing on its bottom end to a horizontal position lying on one side, comprising: a support movable forwardly toward and rearwardly away from the upright pipe; vertically movable lift means on the support and having forwardly projecting tine means having a width less than the diameter of the pipe and insertable forwardly beneath the bottom end of the pipe to an extent in which the free end of the tine means is short of the forward edge portion of the bottom end of the pipe so that upon elevation of the lift and tine means the time means will engage only the diametrically opposed rear edge portion of said bottom end as a fulcrum and the upright pipe will overbalance forwardly; and means carried by the support for intercepting the forwardly overbalanced pipe.

13. Apparatus for turning a length of concrete pipe or the like from an initial upright position standing on its bottom end to a horizontal position lying on one side, comprising: a support movable forwardly toward and rearwardly away from the upright pipe; vertically movable lift means on the support and having forwardly projecting tine means having a width less than the diameter of the pipe and insertable forwardly beneath the bottom end of the pipe to an extent in which the free end of the time means is short of the forward edge portion of the bottom end of the pipe so that upon elevation of the lift andtine means the tine means will engage only the diametrically opposed rear edge portion of said bottom end as afulcrum and the upright pipe will overbalance forwardly; means carried by the support for intercepting the forwardly overbalanced pipe in a forwardly inclined position; and means mounting the intercepting means on the support for lowering the intercepting means relative to the tine means to cause the pipe to descend from said forwardly inclined position to a horizontal position.

14. Apparatus for turning a length of concrete pipe or the like from an initial upright position standing on its bottom end to a horizontal position lying on one side, comprising: a support movable forwardly toward and rearwardly away from the upright pipe; vertically movable lift means on the support and having pipe-engaging means engageable beneath a rear, support-proximate portion of the bottom end of the upright pipe so that elevation of the lift means causes the pipe to overbalance forwardly; means carried by the support for intercepting the forwardly overbalanced pipe in a forwardly inclined position; and means mounting the intercepting means on the support for lowering the intercepting means relative to the lift means to cause the pipe to descend from said forwardly inclined position to a horizontal position.

15. The invention defined in claim 14, including: means for releasing the intercepting means from the horizontal ipe to enable disengagement of the pipe-engaging means from said rear portion of the bottom end of the pipe.

16. Apparatus for turning a length of concrete pipe or the like from an initial upright position to a horizontal position, comprising: a mobile support; means on the support engageable with a peripheral portion of the bottom end of the pipe; means on the support for elevating the engageable means to cause the pipe to fulcrum thereon so as to overbalance in a direction away from the engageable means; means on the support for intercepting the overbalanced pipe short of a horizontal position to temporarily cause the pipe to be supported in part by the engageable means and in part by said intercepting means; and means mounting the intercepting means on the support for lowering the intercepting means relative to the engageable means so that the pipe continues to fulcrum on the engageable means so as to descend by its own weight to a horizontal position.

17. Apparatus for turning a length of concrete pipe or the like from an initial upright position standing on its bottom end to a horizontal position lying on one side, comprising: a support movable forwardly toward and rearwardly away from the upright pipe; vertically movable lift means on the support and having forwardly projecting tine means having a width less than the diameter of the pipe and insertable forwardly beneath the bottom end of the pipe to an extent in which the free end of the tine means is short of the forward edge portion of the bottom end of the pipe so that upon elevation of the lift and time means the tine means will engage only the diametrically opposed rear edge portion of said bottom end as a fulcrum and the upright pipe will overbalance forwardly; arm means pivoted to the support for swinging downwardly and ahead of the upright pipe and upwardly and clear of the upright pipe; pipe-engaging means on the arm means and engageable with the front of the forwardly overbalancing pipe upon downward swinging of the arm means so as to intercept the overbalanced pipe and to combine with the tine means in supporting the pipe in its horizontal position; means on the time means for supporting the horizontal pipe independently of the pipe-engaging means; and means for swinging the arm means downwardly for interception of the pipe by the pipe-engaging means and for swinging the arm means upwardly to clear the pipe-engaging means from the horizontal pipe so that the tine means may be withdrawn from the horizontal pipe.

18. Apparatus for turning a length of concrete pipe or the like from an initial upright position standing on its bottom end to a horizontal position lying on one side, comprising: a support movable forwardly toward and rearwardly away from the upright pipe; vertically movable lift means on the support and having forwardly projecting tine means having a width less than the diameter of the pipe and insertable forwardly beneath the bottom end of the pipe so that upon elevation of the lift and tine means the tine means will engage only the diametrically opposed rear edge portion of said bottom end as a fulcrum and the upright pipe will overbalance forwardly; arm means pivoted on a transverse axis to the support and having pipe-engaging means thereon adapted to intercept and temporarily support the forwardly overbalanced pipe short of a horizontal position; and means for swinging the arm means about said transverse axis to lower the pipe via said pipe-engaging means and relative to the tine means to a horizontal position in which the pipe extends horizontally while supported by the elevated time means and said pipe-engaging means.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2198690 *Jun 27, 1938Apr 30, 1940Wilmore Charles CTree transporting and transplanting device
US2598489 *Apr 21, 1950May 27, 1952Elton A BayerHand truck and lift
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3209933 *Aug 31, 1962Oct 5, 1965Barnes Marion LLift truck attachment for handling a plurality of cylindrical loads
US3235108 *Aug 12, 1963Feb 15, 1966Drakulich MirkoVertical movable log skidder with hold down means
US3970205 *Dec 17, 1974Jul 20, 1976Societe Anonyme: SablaApparatus for handling large and heavy objects
US8109338 *Sep 30, 2009Feb 7, 2012National Oilwell Varco, L.P.Pipe section guide system with flexible member
DE2626108A1 *Jun 10, 1976Dec 22, 1977Ts K Bjuro Avtomatizacii I MecGantry type stacking crane - has slewing load supports of different types at right angles on shafts movable along horizontal guides
Classifications
U.S. Classification414/620, 414/756, 414/910, 414/448, 414/698
International ClassificationB66F9/18
Cooperative ClassificationB66F9/18, Y10S414/123
European ClassificationB66F9/18