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Publication numberUS2959279 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 8, 1960
Filing dateMar 27, 1957
Priority dateMar 27, 1957
Publication numberUS 2959279 A, US 2959279A, US-A-2959279, US2959279 A, US2959279A
InventorsKrafft Frederic B, Roberts Frank K
Original AssigneeAnaconda Wire & Cable Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Packaging wire
US 2959279 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 8, 1960 F. B. KRAFFT ETAL PACKAGING WIRE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 27, 1957 VENTORS IN REDRIC B. KRAFFT ERANK K. ROBERTS BY ATTORNEYS Nov. 8, 1960 F. B. KRAFFT ETAL 2,959,279

PACKAGING WIRE Filed March 27, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 2

INVENTORS FREDRIC B. KRAFFT FRANK K. ROBERTS (ZN-L all M. hwy m ATTORNEYS PACKAGING WIRE Frederic B. Kraitt and Frank K. Roberts, Muskegon,

Mich., assignors to Anaconda Wire and Cable Company, a corporation of Delaware Filed Mar. 27, 1957, Ser. No. 648,935

'3 Claims. (Cl. 206-52) This invention relates to the packaging of magnet wire in containers, and more particularly it relates to a method and apparatus for laying a continuous length of wire in a succession of multi-turn coils eccentrically within an annular cylindrical container, and to the package of wire produced thereby.

In recent years, wire manufacturers have been packaging and shipping small diameter magnet wire in drums or barrels containing very long lengths of such wire. Such packaging heretofore has simply involved laying the wire in a single large coil, or laying it in the form of a succession of superposed flat spiral coils in an annular container. Packaging wire in this fashion has proved very satisfactory for heavy packages containing several hundred pounds of magnet wires of the larger sizes (say No. 22 AWG or larger), but has been relatively unsatisfactory for the small sizes (e.g. No. 24 AWG and smaller), for which a package of one hundred pounds is very large.

The present invention provides an improved package, and improved method and apparatus for producing it, which is especially suited to the fine sizes of magnet wire. Such packages may be in small pails of approximately one hundred pounds each. The invention provides for a unique disposition of the magnet wire in the pail which effectively prevents snarling or tangling of the wire even though the pail may be subjected to severe jostling in transit. The improved package, the method of producing such a package, and the apparatus necessary to carry tainer having a cylindrical wall and an axial cylindricalv core. Disposed within the annular container space defined therebetween is a continuous lengthof Wire formed into a plurality of coils each composed of a plurality of turns. Each such coil is disposed eccentrically relative to adjacent coils and to the container axis.

Such a package is produced, in accordance with the invention, by rotating the container and feeding the wire into it at a linear velocity less than the peripheral velocity of the container. The wire is delivered into the container at a point lying between the inside surface of the container cylinder and a cylindrical axial zone of substantial radius (the space occupied by the container core). The point of delivery of the wire is oscillated through a path lying between the inside surface of the container cylinder and the axial zone, such oscillation being at a frequency equal to the frequency of rotation of the container throughout a large number of rotations of the container. Periodically, however, the frequency of oscillation is altered to a value substantially different from the frequency of rotation of the container for a time which preferably is substantially less than that required for one full rotation of the container (but which may be for any time different from that required for one or more complete rotations, from a fraction of one complete rotation to a fraction more than several complete rotations). As a result, successive multi-turn coils of wire are laid I ire Sates Patent ice 2,959,279 Patented Nov. 8, 1960 2 in the container eccentrically both with respect to the container and with respect to the adjacent coils.

The apparatus designed to carry out the manufacture of a package according to this method includes a rotatable table adapted to support and axially rotate the annular container at constant angular velocity, and a capstan adapted to deliver the wire to ,the container at constant linear velocity. A wire guide is provided to direct the wire from the capstan to a point within the annular container. In order to oscillate this point of delivery as required by the method of the invention, oscillating means are connected with the guide to move it back and forth at a frequency of oscillation equal to the frequency of rotation of the container. A motor is connected in driving engagement with the table and the capstan, and means are provided which normally hold the oscillation of the guide in positive synchronization with rotation of the table. Further means are included for periodically altering the frequency of oscillation of the guide to a value substantially different from the frequency of rotation of the table for a time which preferably is substantially less than that required for one full rotation thereof.

Preferred embodiments of the new package and of the apparatus of the invention, and the best mode of carrying out the method of the invention, are described below with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein Fig. 1 is a schematic illustration of an advantageous embodiment of apparatus according to the invention;

Fig. 2 is a horizontal sectional view of a package of wire produced in accordance with the invention; and

Fig. 3 is an elevation, partly broken away, of the package of wire.

Referring first to Fig. 1, the apparatus includes a rotatable table 1 upon which a cylindrical container 2 is mounted. The container 2 has a cylindrical wall 3 and a cylindrical core 4 to each of which a closing base member 5 (seen in Fig. 3) is attached at their lower ends. tensive and thus define an annular container space 6 between them. Rotation of the table 1 is positively effected by a motor 7 through a horizontal shaft 8, bevel gears -9, a vertical shaft 10 and a pinion 11. The pinion 11 meshes with a spur gear 12 on the table 1. A capstan 13 cooperates with a freely rotatable follower 14 to advance the wire 15 to the container. The capstan is also positively driven by the motor 7 through bevel gears 16 and a capstan shaft 17. Immediately after leaving the capstan, the wire travels into a wire guide 18 comprising a length of tubing mounted at the end near the capstan .on a pivot 19. The opposite end of the guide is bent slightly downwardly over the container, to direct the wire into the annular container space 6.

The point of delivery of the wire into the annular space 6 is substantially radially oscillated by oscillating the feeding guide 18 in a horizontal plane about the pivot 19.

This is accomplished by linking the guide tube to a crank- Upon rotation of aengaged, positive rotative power is transferred to the shaft 1 22 from the motor 7 through bevel gears 28 and spur gears 29. v

The frequency of oscillation of the guide 18 may be altered by transferring the rotative power from motor 7 through spur gears 30, an auxiliary shaft 31, a spur gear 32, and a pinion as, rather than through the clutch 2s.

The wall 3 and core 4 are concentric and coex- In the illustrated embodiment, the frequency of oscillation of the guide 18 is increased relative to the frequency of rotation of the container 2 when power for oscillating the guide is transmitted through the auxiliary shaft 31, due to the small diameter of the pinion 33 relative to the spur gear 32. However, the apparatus could function with equal effectiveness with this ratio reversed, thus causing a substantial reduction, rather than increase, in the frequency of oscillation of the guide 18.

A second clutch 34 is included on the shaft 31 and is also operated by the solenoid 25 through the clutch fork 24. This second clutch, however, is normally in a disengaged condition, as shown. It will be seen, therefore, that the rotative power from the motor 7 is normally transmitted through the first clutch 23, to drive the crank wheel 20 at a normal frequency, but that upon actuation of the solenoid 25 the clutch 23 is disengaged and the clutch 34 is simultaneously engaged so that the crank wheel 20 is driven at a substantially different frequency.

'It should be further noted that the apparatus will also function effectively if the oscillation of the feeding guide is periodically stopped, rather than varied as described above, This may be accomplished by disconnecting the auxiliary shaft entirely (for example, by removing spur gears 30 or 32) and simply disengaging the clutch 23, thereby interrupting the transfer of power through the shaft 22.

It is intended that the guide 18 oscillate uniformly throughout a large number of rotations of the container, at a frequency equal to the rotative frequency of the container (i.e. one complete cycle of oscillation of the guide for each complete revolution of the container), but that such frequency of oscillation be periodically altered for the time necessary for the container to rotate through an angle of, say, 45 to 60 (though this angle may well be extended to wider limits). It is desirable that such periodic alteration in frequency be commenced when the point of delivery of the wire into the container is midway through its path of oscillation. Therefore, a trip 35 is located on the crank wheel 20 to impart one impulse during each revolution of the crank wheel (preferably when the guide 18 is at the mid-point of it oscillation) to a counter-actuated switch assembly 36. The counter element of this assembly counts the impulses it receives from crank wheel trip 35, and after receiving a predetermined number it closes a switch through which the solenoid 25 is energized for the brief length of time that the clutch 23 is to be disengaged.

In packaging wire by use of theabove-described apparatus, the container 2 is rotated on the table 12 at constant angular velocity, and the wire 15 is delivered in to it by the capstan 13 at a constant linear velocity. The guide tube 18 oscillates at a frequency equal to the frequency of rotation of the container as it directs the wire into the annular space 6. The position of the point of delivery of the wire in its path of oscillation is immaterial at the start of the coiling operation, and the end of the wire may be left loose and unattached.

As the feeding guide 18 oscillates it lays the wire 15 on the bottom of the annular space 6 in a substantially circular coil A, as seen in Figs. 2 and 3, eccentrically relative to the axis of the container. The coil builds up in a number of substantially superimposed turns unitl the counter actuated switch 36 activates the solenoid 25. The oscillation of the guide 18 is thereby altered to a different frequency for a brief period (a period equal to 60 rotation of the container in order to produce the pack age shown in Figs. 2 and 3) as the wire continues to be delivered at constant linear velocity. The wire 15 therefore departs from coil A and commences to fall in a second coil B.

It will be seen that the coil B is eccentric to coil A and is in contact therewith only at points B and B". A number of substantially superimposed turnsare similarly laid in coil B until the counter actuated switch 36 once again briefly alters the frequency of oscillation of the guide 18. The wire 15 will depart once more from its coil for a brief period and proceed to lay a third coil C over the coil B. The coil C will be eccentrically disposed relative to each of coils B and A. The operation continues as coils D, E and F are successively laid down, and eventually the coil G will be formed approximately directly over but considerably above coil A. Each of these coils is eccentric with respect both to adjacent coils and to the container axis.

Referring again to Figs. 2 and 3, the package of wire formed by the method and apparatus described hereinbefore includes the cylindrical wall 3 and the concentric co-extensive axial core 4. The bottom of the container is closed by the base member 5, and the open top thereof is closed by a removable cover 38. The continuous length of wire is positioned within the annular space betweenthe wall 3 and the core 4 in a succession of substantially circular coils each occupying a successive level and nominally in contact with only the coils on adjacent levels. Advantageously 75 to turns of wire are laid down in each coil, and there may be several hundred to a thousand or more coils in the entire container. Each coil, as described, is disposed eccentrically relative to coils of adjacent levels and to the axis of the container.

While the foregoing discussion of this invention relates to its application in the packaging of magnet wire, it may readily be adopted with equal effectiveness in the coiling and packaging of several other forms of filamentary material. It is to benoted that the concept is by no means limited to materials (such as wire) which are rigid enough to be pushed through the guide tube by the capstan, since the feeding and oscillating apparatus could easily be positioned over the container with the guide tube substantially vertical and the material could be advanced downwardly by gravity. Hence twines, yarns, threads, etc., can also be advantageously coiled according to this invention. In fact, in virtually any coiling operation where a long continuous length of easily tangled filament is to be packaged, this invention can be of great benefit.

I claim:

1. A package of Wire comprising a continuous length of wire coiled within a closed container. said wire being formed into a plurality of coils each composed of a plurality of substantially concentric turns of wire, each of said coils being disposed eccentrically relative to adjacent coils, and each of said coils further being disposed eccentrically with respect to the container axis.

2. A package of wire comprising concentric coextensive inner and outer cylinders defining an annular container space therebetween, a base member in closing engagement with said concentric cylinders at one end of said containr space, a continuous length of wire coiled within said annular container space, said wire being formed into a plurality of coils each composed of a plurality of substantially concentric superimposed turns of wire, each of said coils circumscribing said inner cylinder and each being disposed eccentrically relative to adjacent coils and to said container axis, and a removable cover in closing engagement with said concentric cylinder at the end of said container space opposite the base member.

3. A package of wire comprising concentric coextensive inner and outer cylinders defining an annular container space therebetween, a circular base member in closing engagement with said concentric cylinders at one end of said container space, a continuous length of wire coiled within said annular container space, said wire being formed into a plurality of coils each of which is substantially circular and composed of a plurality of substantially superimposed concentric turns of wire, each of said coils occupying one of a succession of levels in said container space and each of said coils circumscribing said inner cylinder and being disposed eccentrically relative bothto coils in adjacent levels and to said container axis, and arernovable cover in closing engagement References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Morgan Jan. 19, 1886 Bournonville June 3, 1913 6 Johnson Feb. 26, 1935 Dempsey Mar. 26, 1935 McDonald Oct. 11, 1938 Wilkie Aug. 16, 1949 Lyon Dec. 9, 1952 Smith May 26, 1953 Wilhelm Nov. 8, 1955

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US334453 *Jul 7, 1865Jan 19, 1886 Reeling mechanism
US1063646 *Aug 7, 1912Jun 3, 1913Antoine BournonvilleUnreeling device for electric conductors.
US1992430 *May 12, 1933Feb 26, 1935Edgar H JohnsonPanning machine
US1995498 *Mar 13, 1933Mar 26, 1935Chase Companies IncMachine for coiling and packaging strand material
US2132573 *Nov 21, 1934Oct 11, 1938Mcdonald Louis NRod coiling apparatus
US2478960 *Jun 21, 1946Aug 16, 1949Pacific MillsSliver collecting means
US2620997 *Feb 28, 1950Dec 9, 1952Joseph James Habib SrWire container
US2639873 *Aug 5, 1947May 26, 1953Gen Cable CorpWire package
US2722729 *Jul 9, 1954Nov 8, 1955Rhee Elastic Thread CorpMethod and apparatus for packaging strands of flexible material into cylindrical containers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3014262 *Jun 4, 1958Dec 26, 1961Kendall & CoWiry strand packaging mechanism
US3880376 *Feb 14, 1973Apr 29, 1975Asea AbMethod of coiling strip-formed material and a means for carrying out the method
US3941146 *Feb 20, 1974Mar 2, 1976Institut Francaise Du Petrole, Des Carburants Et LubrifiantsApparatus for storing a flexible elongated member, such as a flexible drill column
US5172453 *May 15, 1991Dec 22, 1992Murata Kikai Kabushiki KaishaSliver can
US5400476 *Jul 12, 1994Mar 28, 1995Myrick-White, Inc.Apparatus and method for controlling draft uniformity in textile sliver
US5490595 *Jun 6, 1994Feb 13, 1996Sumitomo Wiring Systems, Ltd.Bundle-of-electric wire container
US5673461 *Dec 14, 1995Oct 7, 1997Vyzkumny Ustav Textilnich Stroju Liberec A.S.Method of, and device for, depositing a textile fiber sliver into a flat sliver can
US6260781 *Nov 26, 1999Jul 17, 2001Lincoln Global, Inc.Method and apparatus for packing wire in a storage drum
US7004419 *Jul 30, 2003Feb 28, 2006Lincoln Global, Inc.Apparatus for packing wire in a storage container by use of reverse winding
US7665685Apr 17, 2008Feb 23, 2010Deepflex, Inc.Modular carousel assembly and method
EP1726375A1Mar 17, 2006Nov 29, 2006Lincoln Global, Inc.Method for forming a large diameter weld wire by imparting a desired shape memory on said wire; A packaged supply of wire and a weld wire with such imparted shape memory form
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/408, 19/159.00R, 242/174, 206/409, 242/361.4, 28/289, 242/170
International ClassificationB21C47/02, B21C47/10, B21C47/14
Cooperative ClassificationB21C47/146, B21C47/10
European ClassificationB21C47/10, B21C47/14D