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Publication numberUS2959386 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 8, 1960
Filing dateDec 3, 1957
Priority dateDec 3, 1957
Publication numberUS 2959386 A, US 2959386A, US-A-2959386, US2959386 A, US2959386A
InventorsErnest D G Garth
Original AssigneeErnest D G Garth
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bag supports
US 2959386 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. D. G. GARTH 2,959,386

BAG SUPPORTS Filed Dec. 3. 1957 INENTOR.

Emesifi 56 51717,

BY 6346? e/ r A TTORNEYS.

United States Patent BAG SUPPORTS Ernest D. G. Garth, 23 Plymouth Road, Summit, NJ.

Filed Dec. 3, 1957, Ser. No. 700,432

Claims. (Cl. 248-95) This invention relates to bag supports. More particularly, it is concerned with a support for the suspension of surgical bags and drain tubes at the sides of hospital beds.

The chief aim of my invention is to provide a simple and inexpensive support for the above purpose which is easily and quickly attachable to the bed, which is resistive to easy displacement when positioned on the bed, and from which the bag can be quickly removed after being emptied and replaced, or replaced by a new one.

Other objects and advantages will appear from the following detailed description of the attached drawings, wherein:

Fig. l is a perspective view of a surgical bag and drain tube support conveniently embodying my invention.

Fig. 2 is a view showing the support in vertical section and how the support is attached to the bed; and

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary view in perspective showing a modification.

From Figs. 1 and 2 of these illustrations it Will be noted that my improved support comprises a horizontally elongate frame which, in practice, is fashioned from stout wire or any other suitably stifi strip material. The end members comprise somewhat irregular substantially inverted U-shaped end portions 1 and 2 of which the longer frontal legs 3 and 4 are inwardly kinked as at 5 and 6 and are adapted to be engaged, as shown in Fig. 2, downwardly over and beneath one of the side rails R of a bed. The inwardly kinked portions form ledges for engagement with the underside of the rails. The longer frontal leg 3 of the inverted U-shaped end portion 1 is formed with a horizontal bar extension 7 over which a hem H along the top edge of a rectangular drainage bag B of transparent flexible material is impaled to sustain the bag in suspension. The pendant frontal leg 4 of the other inverted U-shaped end portion 2 of the frame is formed at the bottom with a retaining hook 8 into which the distal end of the bar 7 is sprung from above after application of the bag B to the bar as above explained. Somewhat above the hook 8, the pendant frontal leg 4 of the inverted U-shaped end portion 2 is fashioned with a double coil helix 9 between the convolutions of which the drain tube T leading from the patient in the bed is adapted to be frictionally engaged and thus held firmly and substantially vertically with the end of the tube passing down into the bag B through an opening C at one of the top corners of said bag. The engagement and disposition of the tube T is such as to insure free flow of fluid to the bag B.

When engaged over the side rail of the bed, the frame is held against easy displacement as will be readily understood from Fig. 2. When the bag B is full, the tube T can be easily and quickly detached from the coil 9 and withdrawn from the bag. With this accomplished, it will be apparent that the bag can be removed with equal facility from the bar 7 upon disengagement of the latter from the hook 8, and replaced, after being emptied or a new one be substituted for it.

'In the modification, of Fig. 3, the bar 7a is separately formed and has a pivotal loop connection as at 10 with the pendant frontal leg 3a of the inverted U-shaped end portion 1a of the frame. In all other respects, the construction and use of the frame of the modification is identical with that of the frame illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2. Accordingly, in order to dispense with the necessity for repetitive description all of the elements of the modification, having their counterparts in the first described embodiment, are designated by the same reference numerals, with addition however in each instance, of the letter a for convenience of more ready distinction.

While in accordance with the provisions of the statutes I have illustrated and described two embodiments of my invention, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that changes may be made in the form of the supports herein described and illustrated without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention, as set forth in the appended claims, and that in some cases certain features of my invention may be used to advantage without a corresponding use of other features.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. A bag support in the form of a wire frame having end members with inverted U-shaped portions for hooking downwardly over a side rail of a bed, and a horizontal, bag-holding, cross bar connecting said end members at their low extremities, one of said end members being fashioned in the region below its inverted U-shaped portion to form a clamp for a tube and having opposed clamping elements disposed substantially vertically above the point of connection between the aforementioned end member and said cross bar.

2. A bag support as defined in claim 1 in which one end of the cross bar is fixedly connected to the lower extremity of one of said end members, and the other end of said cross bar is detachably connected to the lower extremity of the other end member.

3. A bag support as defined in claim 1 in which the tube clamping elements comprise convolutions of a wire coil having its axis substantially paralleling the axis of the cross bar.

4. A bag support in the form of a wire frame having end members with inverted U-shaped portions for hooking downwardly over a side rail of a bed, and inwardly kinked portions providing ledges adapted to engage the underside of the rail, and a horizontal, bag-holding, cross bar connecting said end members at their lower extremities, one of said end members being fashioned in the region below its inwardly kinked portion to form a tube clamp having opposed clamping elements disposed above the point of connection between the aforementioned end member and said cross bar.

5. A bag support as defined in claim 4 in the form of an integral, one-piece wire frame.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 611,122 Hess Sept. 20, 1898 1,140,145 Finger May 18, 1915 1,567,667 Ricketts Dec. 29, 1925 2,261,511 Baker Nov. 4, 1941

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US611122 *Dec 20, 1897Sep 20, 1898 School waste-poke
US1140145 *Nov 11, 1914May 18, 1915Frederick W FingerHose-nozzle support.
US1567667 *Feb 27, 1922Dec 29, 1925Ray G MillerInstrument for teaching telegraphy
US2261511 *Nov 24, 1939Nov 4, 1941Baker Rita IBag and napkin holding device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3090968 *Aug 17, 1962May 28, 1963Becton Dickinson CoDisposable urinary drainage bag assembly
US3186409 *May 4, 1962Jun 1, 1965Princeton Lab IncDrainage bag
US3186410 *Aug 27, 1962Jun 1, 1965Becton Dickinson CoClosed system urinary drainage set
US3231901 *May 14, 1963Feb 1, 1966Floyd E KennedyHospital drain bag hanger
US3237624 *Mar 5, 1962Mar 1, 1966Medex IncDrainage bag
US3251069 *Mar 9, 1964May 17, 1966Plastronics IncInlet tube stabilizer for flexible container
US3253593 *Dec 3, 1963May 31, 1966Macbick CompanyUrinary drainage system and parts thereof
US3254817 *Aug 31, 1964Jun 7, 1966Frank J BartzHolder for surgical drainage bags
US3332422 *Sep 24, 1963Jul 25, 1967Medex IncIsolating connector for drainage bag
US3782384 *Feb 16, 1971Jan 1, 1974Timmermans CSurgical suction jar
US3896809 *Sep 24, 1973Jul 29, 1975Carl A SamuelSupport for a continuous drain unit connected with a catheter
US4221371 *Dec 7, 1978Sep 9, 1980Siemens AktiengesellschaftUrological examination table
US4295619 *Nov 13, 1979Oct 20, 1981Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Solution container hanger
US4393880 *Mar 25, 1981Jul 19, 1983The Kendall CompanyDevice for collecting body liquids
US20040222341 *Mar 8, 2004Nov 11, 2004Health Science Technology, LLCIntravenous equipment hangers
US20040237242 *Dec 5, 2003Dec 2, 2004Hartigan William J.Method and apparatus for capturing debris generated from a procedure on a human's extremities
US20060025730 *Oct 17, 2005Feb 2, 2006Hartigan William J JrMethod and apparatus for capturing debris generated from a procedure on a human's extremeties
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/95, 128/DIG.240, 604/322, D24/118
International ClassificationA61G7/05
Cooperative ClassificationY10S128/24, A61G7/0503
European ClassificationA61G7/05H