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Publication numberUS2959799 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 15, 1960
Filing dateJun 21, 1955
Priority dateJun 21, 1955
Publication numberUS 2959799 A, US 2959799A, US-A-2959799, US2959799 A, US2959799A
InventorsGreenleaf Nathaniel B, Reeve Tofil A
Original AssigneeSponge Products Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wringing and control mechanism for sponge mops
US 2959799 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NW. 15, 1960 N. B. GREENLEAF ETAL 2,959,799

WRINGING AND CONTROL MECHANISM FOR SPONGE MOPS Filed June'zl. 1955 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVEN O ANIEL B. OFIL A.

GREENEAF REEVE NAT'H Nov. 15, 1960 N. B. GREENLEAF ETAL 2,959,799

WRINGING AND CONTROL MECHANISM FOR SPONGE MOPS Filed June 21, 1955 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTEIR NATHANIEL B. GREENLEAF TOFIL A. REEVE M W Nov. 15, 1960 N. B. GREENLEAF EI'AL 2,959,799

WRINGING AND CONTROL MECHANISM FOR SPONGE MOPS Filed June 21, 1955 3 Sheets-Sheet 3- INVENTOR NATHANIEL B. GREENLEAF TOFIL A. REEVE 2,959,799 Patented Nov. 15, 1960 WRINGING AND CONTROL MECHANISM FOR SPONGE MOPS Nathaniel B. Greenleaf and Tofil A. Reeve, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, assignors to Sponge Products Corporation, Chicago, Ill.

Filed June 21, 1955, Ser. No. 516,810

2 Claims. (Cl. 15-119) This invention relates to improvements in sponge mops of the type in which the mopping element or sponge is folded upon itself in the wringing action and compressed to squeeze out the water.

More particularly the invention relates to mops wherein the sponge is mounted on suitable backing plates hinged to a mop head and is folded transversely intermediately of its length upon itself by means of a suitable slide operated lever or other mechanism.

In the past, such mops have required that the handle extend rigidly upwardly at right angles to the mop head to accommodate the sponge folding slide mechanisms.

This required right angular relation of the mop head and handle has several important disadvantages. It prevents the introduction of the mop under low objects or furniture, and since such mops have required a rectangular sponge element it necessitates a compression of the rearward portion of the sponge when the handle is placed at a convenient working angle and pressure is applied to maintain the bottom working face of the sponge on the floor. The compression of the rearward sponge portion restricts its ability to absorb moisture and therefore reduces the effective sponge volume available for mopping;

Because of the fact that the folding or wringing action of this type of mop requires the use of a flat sponge element the desired angular handle arrangement cannot be satisfactorily achieved by using a bevelled sponge.

It is therefore the object of the present invention to provide a mop of the type referred to in which the handle will conveniently be inclined at an angle to the mop head as constituted by the backing plates during the mopping operation yet will allow the same effective wringing action achieved in the present mops of this type .to be achieved. f

Because the wringing action requires ofuthe swinging of the backing plates about axes parallel to the planes of these plates, the operating'mechanism for actuating the backing plates can only function when the handle is perpendicular to these axes, that is, perpendicular to the backing plates.

It is therefore a particular object of the present invention to enable the user to wring the mop without first having to adjust the handle from a working position to a position perpendicular to the backing plates.

It has also been found that mops of the type referred to in which the sponge is folded transversely on itself have an annoying tendency to close with the backing plates swinging towards the wringing position under the mopping action, and it is another important object of the invention to eliminate such closing movement.

The principal feature of the invention resides in providing a novel pivot arrangement in the connections between the handle and mop head and the backing plate operating arms and the backing plate whereby through an offset of pivots the mop head including the backing plates is first automatically actuated to swing relative to the handle into a position perpendicular thereto at the commencement of the wringing action.

More particularly according to the invention the mop is provided with a head including backing plates hinged thereto to swing about parallel axes and with a handle and a slide mechanism carrying arms or levers for operating the backing plates in the wringing action, the handle and slide arms being secured to the mop head and backing plates respectively to swing about parallel axes disposed in right angular relation to the pivot axes of the backing plates With the axes of the slide arm pivots being offset from the pivot axis of the handle in the direction of handle inclination, and the slide arm pivots and the handle pivots being relatively shiftable to accommodate the swinging of the head from the mopping position to a position perpendicular to the handle preparator to wringing.

Another important feature resides in providing means to limit relative movement of the mop head and handle so that the handle will be precisely perpendicular to the head at initiation of the wringing action and at the desired angle for mopping.

In this respect it is another feature of the invention to provide a spring arrangement to maintain the desired angle between the handle and head when the mop is not being wrung.

With reference to the accompanying drawings:

Figure l is a perspective view partly broken away of a mop constructed to embody the invention.

Figure 2 is an enlarged end elevational view partly broken away of the mop of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a front elevational view of the mop of Figures 1 and 2, with the handle swung to a position perpendicular to the mop head and backing plates.

Figure 4 is an end elevational view of the mop in the position of Figure 3.

Figure 5 is a fragmentary front elevational view of the mop in the wringing position.

Figure 6 is a perspective view of the handle end portion which connects to the mop head. I

Figure 7 is an end elevational view of an' alternative construction of the mop, with the handle inclined to the mop head in the mopping position; the sponge element being omitted.

Figure 8 is a view similar to Figure 7, but showing the handle swung to the position in right angular relation to the mop head preparatory to wringing.

Figure 9 is a view similar to Figure 7 but showing a further alternative construction.

Figure 10 is a view similar to Figure 9 but showing the handle swung to the position in right angular relation to the mop head preparatory to wringing.

With reference to Figs. 1 to 6, the mop comprises a head 1 formed as a flat plate having downturned flanges rolled at their lower ends to provide hinge barrels 2. Mounted on the upper surface of the head 1 is a pivot lug 3 for supporting the handle structure.

Suitable backing plates 4 are hinged to the hinge barrels 2 of the mop head by means of suitable pins 5 with the backing plates having rolled hinge barrels 6 to align with the barrels 3 to receive the pins.

Pivoted to the head 1 is a tubular handle 7 provided at its lower end with an insert 8 carrying a curved toe 9 slotted as at 10. A pin 11 extending through the toe 9 and the ears of the pivot lug 3 serves to pivotally connect the handle to the mop head. The underside of the toe, as indicated at 12, on contacting the head'l as" best seen in Figure 2, forms a stop whichv limits the in-' clination of the handle 7 relative to the head. This inclination may be at any desired angle, preferably. 45

degrees or somewhat greater.

The curved toe 9 projects forwardly of the centre line: in the longitudinal direction "of the backing plates 4 so that the pin 11 is disposed forwardly of such a centre line and the pivot axis of the handle as constituted by the pin 11 is at right angles to the pivot axes of the backing plates as constituted by the pins 5.

The toe 9 is formed at its forward end with an angled portion 13 which is adapted to contact the pivot 111g 3 and form a stop when the handle is swung to the position of Figure 4 substantially perpendicular to the mop head 1, including the backing plates 4, The handle is thus movable relative to the head" between two positions, one perpendicular to the head as shown in Figure 4, and one inclined to the head as shown in Figure 2, the stops 12 and 13 defining these limits of movement.

A coil spring 14 threaded on a pivot pin of the handle 7 and arranged to act on the pivot lug 3 and the toe 9 of the handle serves to effect the relative movement of the handle and head into the angular relation of Figure 2. The notch formed in the toe 9 of th handle insert conveniently receives the spring 14.

Secured to the underside of the backing plate 4 by means of screws and wing nuts 16 is a suitable sponge element provided with a backing 17. Projecting upwardly from each of the backing plates 4 are pivot lugs 19 to which are pivoted by means of pins 20, pivot lugs 21 pivotally carried on pins 21 at the lower end of arms 22 of levers 23 fulcrumed on a slide 24 slidably mounted on the handle 7. The axes of the pins are in alignment and lie generally on the longitudinal centre line of the backing plate 4, parallel to, but offset rearwardly from, the axis of the pin 11 forming the handl pivot.

Preferably, the axes of the pins 20 are displaced below the axis of the pin 11. The pins 20 are supported in orifices 25 formed in the lug 19 which orifices, as best seen in Figure 2, are enlarged to provide a loose pivotal connection whereby the pivot pins 20 and hence the pivot axes of the lugs 21 are shiftable relative to the mop head and backing plates, the purpose of which will be more fully understood from the explanation below.

Mounted above the slide 24 is a second slide 26 to the lower end of which is pivotally secured a pair of links 27 pivotally secured in turn to the upper ends of the levers 23 In operation, the slide 26 which is in its uppermost position with the mop in normal mopping position as illustrated in Figure l, is moved down the handle when it is desired to efiect wringing of the sponge elements 15. The first movement of the slide 24 applies pressure through the links 27 and levers 23 on the pivots formed by the pins 20 at a point ofliset of the pivotaxis of the handle pivot pin 11.

This pressure in a downward direction and offset from the pivotal connection of the handle and mop head effects a rotative movement of the mop head and backing plates about th pivot pin 11 to effect relative movement of the parts to the position of Figure 4 wherein the handle 7 is perpendicular to the mop head as defined by the stop surfaces 13. In this position, the levers 23 are perpendicular to the axes of the pins 5 about which the backing plates 4 hinge, so that further downward movement of the slide 24 effects the swinging of the backing plates 4 about the pins 5, to move these plates from a substantially aligned position to a substantially parallel position as illustrated in Figure 5, to eifect a folding and compressing of the sponge element 15.

Thus actuation of the slide 24 etfects first an initial positioning of the mop head and backing plates relative to the handle in preparation for the folding of the backing plates into the wringing position of Figure 5 without the operator taking any steps to orient the handle relative to the head and backing plates.

Inasmuch as in the automobile positioning of the mop head and backing plates relative to the handle, these latter members are constrained to move in an are about the pivot pin 11 from the position of Figure l to the position of Figure 4 while the pivot pins 20 carried by the lugs 21 on the levers 23 are constrained to mov in a linear path. The orifices 25 in the pivot lugs 19 must be of a sufficient size to accommodate the relative displacement of the pivot pins 20 and lugs 19.

By locating the pins 20 below the pivot pin 11 forming the pivot axis of the handle, this relative displacement is maintained at a minimum although it will be appreciated that the particular relative disposition of the pins 20 and 11 need not be maintained as will be seen with reference to the modified form of the invention illustrated in Figures 7 and 8.

The latter two figures illustrate a handle 28 formed with an extension 29 pivoted to a lug 30 carried by the mop head including backing plates generally designated at 31. The backing plates are provided with pivot lugs as illustrated at 32 corresponding to the pivot lugs 19 and these lugs support the pins 33 corresponding to the pins 20 carried by the lever members 34 corresponding to the levers 23 (only one such lever and lug being shown).

In this arrangement the pivot pins 33 of the levers 34 are disposed substantially in the same horizontal plane as the pivot pin 35 forming the pivotal connection between the handle and mop head with the parts disposed in the normal mopping operation as illustrated in Figure 7. To provide for the increased relative movement of the pins 33 and the mop head, as the mop head is swung to the position of Figure 8 perpendicular to the handle prior to folding of the backing plates, the lugs 32 are formed with elongated slots 36 corresponding to the orifices 25.

Again, in the embodiment shown in Figures 7 and 8, the end of the handle 28 is provided with stop surfaces 37 and 38 respectively to limit inclination of and vertically locate the handle as depicted by the two positions of Figures 7 and 8.

In the embodiment of the invention shown in Figures 9 and 10 instead of having the pivots 39 connecting the lever arms 40 with the pivot lugs 41 carried by the backing plates 42, shiftable relative to the lugs 41, the pivot pin 43 pivotally connecting the tongue 9' of the handle 7' is mounted in slots 44 provided in the pivot lug 45 carried by the head 46 to allow shifting of the handle pivot relative to the head.

With the mop of Figure 9 in the mopping position as shown in Figure 9, the handle pivot 43 is located at the lower end of the slots 44 of the head pivot lug 45. Movement of the, lever arms 40 carried by the slide 24' down the handle acts through the offset pivots 39 to rotate the mop head and backing plates about the pivot 43 into the position preparatory to wringing shownin Figure 10.

Since the pivot pins 39 are required to move in a straight line path and since the head 1 swings in an arc, the pivot pin 43 moves up in the slots 44 to the dotted line position illustrated in Figure 10 to accommodate the straight line motion of the pins 39. This position of the pin 43 is reached at a point between the positions of Figures 9 and 10, and in the final position, the pin 43 comes to rest at the lower end of the slot again as shown in Figure 10.

While the shiftable handle pivot 43 in the embodiment of the invention shown in Figures 9 and 10 accommodates the relative shifting of the handle and lever arm pivots, the handle tongue 9, may, as in the embodiment of the invention shown in Figures 1 to 6, be providedwith limiting stop surfaces 12 and 13 corresponding to the surfaces 12 and 13, shown particularly in Figure 6.

It will be appreciated, of course, that the tongue 9' could be provided with a slot corresponding to the slots 44 to allow relative turning of the handle and head, yet enabling the pivot pins 39 to maintain their straight line path as dictated by the movement of the ends. of the levers 40.

While the drawings attached hereto are submitted as.

illustrating particular embodiments of the invention, it will be understood that various other modifications in structural detail and arrangement may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.

What we claim as our invention is:

1. In a mop structure having a head, a pair of aligned backing plates each hinged to said head at opposite sides thereof, a handle mounted on said head, and a slide wringer mechanism on said handle having a pair of lever means swivelly connected to said backing plates and swingable relative thereto about a first axis; handle mounting means comprising a toe fixed to the end of said handle, a pivot lug fixed to said head and a pivot pin carried by said lug and extending through said toe intermediate the forward portion and the rearward portion of said toe, said handle being pivotable about the pivot pin axis, said pivot pin axis being substantially parallel to and forwardly posiltioned of said first axis, said forward portion of said toe being upwardly configured and bearing against said lug when the handle is pivoted into upright position relative to said plates, said rearward portion being upwardly configured and bearing against said lug when the handle is pivoted into operating position inclined relative to said plates and spring means bearing against said toe urging said handle into operating position.

2. A device as defined in claim 1 wherein said rearward portion is curved and said handle in the upright position is substantially bisected by said first axis.

References Cited in-the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,100,029 Severns June 16, 1914 1,437,789 Whyte Dec. 2, 1922 1,771,325 Cotter July 22, 1930 2,706,303 Ours Apr. 19, 1955 2,864,107 Greenleaf Dec. 16, 1958 FOREIGN PATENTS 76,184 Norway Jan. 30, 1950 216,565 Germany Nov. 24, 1909 466,474 Canada July 11, 1950 496,850 Belgium July 31, 1950 617,197 Germany Aug. 14, 1935

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1100029 *Jan 12, 1914Jun 16, 1914William SevernsSpring-actuated pivotal connecting means for mop-handles.
US1437789 *Feb 3, 1921Dec 5, 1922Whyte Isabella BMop
US1771325 *Jan 25, 1928Jul 22, 1930Cotter John RAdjustable handle
US2706303 *Jul 11, 1952Apr 19, 1955Sidney P VaughnMop device having wringing means to squeeze the mop element
US2864107 *Aug 23, 1954Dec 16, 1958Sponge Products CorpSelf-wringing mop construction
BE496850A * Title not available
CA466474A *Jul 11, 1950Harry M ParkerMop
DE216565C *Oct 30, 1908Nov 24, 1909 Title not available
DE617197C *Jan 15, 1933Aug 14, 1935Theodor SendlerWischgeraet mit geteiltem Wischerkopf
NO76184A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3030648 *Jul 27, 1959Apr 24, 1962Greenleaf Nathaniel BWringing apparatus
US5131111 *Apr 5, 1991Jul 21, 1992Richardson Holly MButterfly mop
US6119297 *Oct 26, 1998Sep 19, 2000Leifheit AgWet mop for planar surfaces
US6370725 *Mar 27, 1998Apr 16, 2002The Decor Corporation Pty. Ltd.Mops
US6698056 *Jul 28, 1998Mar 2, 2004E. D. Oates Pty Ltd.Butterfly sponge mop with angle-adjustable handle
US6854149 *Feb 28, 2000Feb 15, 2005Freudenberg Household Products LpMops and mop components
US7216403 *Aug 27, 2004May 15, 2007Deborah DeckerErgonomic appliance handle
US7257853Aug 5, 2003Aug 21, 2007Freudenberg Household Products LpMops and mop components
US7464440 *Aug 26, 2005Dec 16, 2008Deborah DeckerErgonomic appliance handle
US20100313370 *Nov 11, 2009Dec 16, 2010Ming-Hsien LinCleaning apparatus with tiltable cleaning head
WO2006026516A2 *Aug 29, 2005Mar 9, 2006Deborah DeckerErgonomic appliance handle
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/119.2, 15/244.2, 15/144.1
International ClassificationA47L13/146, A47L13/10
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/146
European ClassificationA47L13/146