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Publication numberUS2960083 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 15, 1960
Filing dateSep 17, 1957
Priority dateSep 17, 1957
Publication numberUS 2960083 A, US 2960083A, US-A-2960083, US2960083 A, US2960083A
InventorsJoseph F Grimland, Charles J Grimland
Original AssigneeGrimland Company Manufacturers
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Controlled volume blast valve
US 2960083 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 15, 1960 .1. F. GRIMLAND ETAL 2,960,083

CONTROLLED VOLUME BLAST VALVE Filed Sept. 17, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Joseph E Grim/and Char/es J. Grim/and I N VEN TORS.

CONTROLLED VOLUME BLAST VALVE Joseph F. Grimland, Marietta, Ga., and Charles J. Grimland, Waco, Tex., assignors to Grimland Company Manufacturers Ina, Marietta, Ga., a corporation of Georgia Filed Sept. 17, 1957, Ser. No. 684,494 Claims. ((1124-11) This invention relates'in general to new anduseful improvements in pneumatic valves, and more specifically to a valve which is of the controlled volume blast type.

In order to provide for indoor training, the armed services are developing pneumatic actuator units which may be placed in a weapon barrel so that smaller projectiles may be projected from the weapon barrel through a smaller barrel. Inasmuch as these practice units are not only used for the purpose of teaching units how to load and fire the weapons, but also to train the weapons, it is necessary that there be provided means for accurately propelling the projectiles from the training units.

It is therefore the primary object of this invention to provide a controlled volume blast valve which is of such a construction whereby it may be mass produced with normal tolerances and is of such a nature whereby the same projecting force will be exerted upon a projectile disposed in a barrel connected to the valve during each and every firing operation for each of the numerous valves which may be manufactured.

Another object of this invention is to provide a controlled volume blast valve which is so constructed whereby the valve has an internal air supply of sufiicient capacity to provide for the'necessary projecting of a projectile and the valve is not dependent upon any flow from a pressure source during the discharge thereof whereby accurate controls for supplying air-to the valve are no longer necessary.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved valve for use in conjunction with a barrel for projecting a projectile, such as a simulated mortar shell, from the barrel, the valve being so constructed whereby it has a relief valve to relieve the air from within the barrel as the projectile slides down thebarrel and such relief valve is automatically closed by engagement of the projectile with the relief valve and a control valve member of the valve is moved to an open position whereby an air supply under pressure is communicated with the atcnt 2,960,083 Patented Nov. 15, 1950 ice gagement with the barrel and moving elements of the valve to operating positions whereby a controlled volume of air may be blasted into the barrel to project the projectile therefrom;

Figure 4 is an enlarged transverse horizontal sectional view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 44 of Figure 2 and shows the general arrangement of a manual operator and the air supply line for the valve;

Figure 5 is an enlarged fragmentary transverse sectional view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 5-5 of Figure 2 and shows the internal construction of the valve taken through the air supply chamber thereof; and

Figure 6 is an enlarged bottom view of the valve with the cover thereof having a portion thereof broken away in order to show the details of the connection between the manual operator and the relief valve.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, it will be seen that there is illustrated in Figure l a mortar which is referred to in general by the reference numeral 10. The mortar 10 includes a base plate 12 and a tripod l4. Seated on the base plate 12 is a lower end member 16 of a barrel 18. The tripod M is provided at the upper end thereof with a training mechanism 20 in which an upper portion of the barrel 18 is mounted whereby the barrel 18 may be trained onto a target. It is to be understood that the mortar 10 is of a conventional construction,

Mounted within the barrel 18 is a pneumatic projectile projecting training unit which is referred to in general by the reference numeral 22. The training unit 22 includes a controlled volume blast valve, which is the subject of this invention the valve being referred to in general by the reference numeral 24. Connected to the valve 24 and supported thereby is a small diamlower end of the barrel to project the projectile there- 1 from.

A further object of this invention is to provide'a controlled volume blast valve which is of such a nature whereby it may be placed into a weapon barrel, such as the barrel of a mortar, the valve being self-contained and being normally operated by the dropping of a projectile into engagement with a component thereof, and there also being provided a manual actuator whereby the valve may be manually unloaded prior to disassembly.

These together with other objects and advantages which I will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the ac- 1 companying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

Figure 1 is an elevational viewof a mortar which is set up and which is equipped with a pneumatic projectile eter barrel 26 which is disposed concentric to the barrel 18 and which projects slightly out of the supper end thereof. Also connected to the valve 24 is an air supply line 28 which has connected thereto an air supply hose 30 which in turn is connected to a pressure regulator 32 carried by an air supply tank 34. The purpose of the training unit 22 is to permit the mortar 10 to be fired Within an armory or the like so as to teach troops in the use of the mortar 10. However, in order that the troops may learn the training of the mortar with respect to a target, it is necessary that a projectile, such as the projectile 36 illustrated in Figures 2 and 3, be accurately fired from the training unit 22.

Referring now to Figures 2 and 3 in particular, it will be seen that the controlled volume blast valve 24 includes a housing which is referred to in general by the reference numeral 38. The housing 38 is formed of a cylindrical body member 40 which has the lower end thereof recessed as at 42 and which has seated in the recess 42 a lower end member 44. The end member 44 is retained in place by an inturned annular flange 46 on the extreme lower end of the body member 40. Further, the lower end member 44 is sealed with respect to the body member 40 by means of an O-ring 48.

The upper end portion of the body member 40 is internally recessed as at 50 and has seated therein an upper end member 52. The upper end member 52 is retained in place by an inwardly turned annular flange 54 in the extreme upper end of the body member 40. Further, the upper end member 52 is sealed with respect to the body member 40 by means of an O-ring 56. Thus the body member 40, the upper end member 52 and the lower end member 44 define a storage chamber 58 for a predetermined volume of compressed air.

Extending through the center of the upper end member 52 is a circular cross-sectional opening which is referred to in general by the reference numeral 68. The opening 60 includes a restricted central portion 62, an enlarged lower portion 64 and a still larger internally threaded upper portion 66. Threadedly engaged in the upper portion 66 is the lower end of the barrel 26.

The lower end member 44 is provided with an opening therethrough which is referred to in general by the reference numeral 68. The opening 68 is disposed in alignment with the opening 60 and includes an upper portion 70 and an enlarged internally threaded lower portion 72.

Passing through the opening 68 is a plug member which is referred to in general by the reference numeral 74. The plug member 74 includes a head 76 which engages the underside of the lower end member 44 and whose shape facilitates the turning of the stud member 74. A lower portion of the stud member 74 is externally threaded as at 78 and engaged with the internally threaded portion 72 of the opening 68. The stud member 74 also includes a main body portion 80 which extends through the upper portion 70 and into the chamber 58. The upper portion 70 is sealed with respect to the opening 68 by means of an O-ring 82.

Telescoped over the upper part of the body portion 88 is a sleeve 84. The sleeve 84 has the upper end thereof disposed within the lower portion 64 of the opening 68 and is sealed with respect to the upper end member 52 by means of an O-ring 86. It is to be understood that the fit between the sleeve 84 and the body portion 80 is such so as to prevent the escape of air therebetween.

The sleeve 84 is provided immediately below the underside of the upper end member 52 with a plurality of circumferentially spaced discharge ports 88. Disposed within the sleeve 84 and normally closing the discharge ports 88 is a valve member 90. The valve member 90 is provided with O-rings 92 and 94 which are disposed above and below, respectively, the discharge ports 88 when the valve member 90 is in a closed position. The valve member 90 is normally retained in a closed position by means of a spring 96 which is in engagement with the lower end thereof and which is seated in an upper recess 98 formed in the body portion 80 of the stud member 74;

The valve member 90 includes an upper end portion 100 which is of a reduced cross-section and which extends upwardly into the lower end of the barrel 26. The body member 100 is provided with a pressure relieving bore 102 therethrough which is normally communicated with the interior of the barrel 26 for a reason to be described in detail hereinafter. Extending through the bore 102 is a valve stem 104 of a relief valve which is referred to in general by the reference numeral 106. The valve stem 104 is of a much smaller diameter than the diameter of the bore 102 so as to permit air flow through the bore 102around the valve stem 104. The relief valve 106 also includes a head 108 which is engageable with a valve seat 110 formed at the upper end of the valve member 90 surrounding the bore 102. The head 108 is provided with a surface 112 which is complementary to the valve seat 110 for sealing engagement with the valve seat 110 to close the bor 182.

Disposed outwardly from the center of the housing 38 and extending through the lower end member 44 and the upper end member 52 are aligned bores 114 and 116, respectively. Extending through the bores 114 and 116 is a sleeve 118. The sleeve 118 has an outwardly flared lower end 120 which engages the under-surface of the lower end member 44 and which is sealed relative thereto by means of an O-ring 122. The upper end of the sleeve 116 is also outwardly flared as at 124 and is sealed with respect to the upper end member 52 by means of an O-ring 126.

Extending freely down through the sleeve 118 in spaced relation thereto is an actuator rod 128. The actuator rod 128 extends up out of the mortar barrel 18 and is provided with an offset handle 130 at the upper end thereof. The actuator rod 128 is provided at the lower end thereof with a reduced externally threaded portion 132 which receives a bar 134 held in place by a nut 136. The bar 134 extends radially from the actuator rod 128 and has the opposite end thereof disposed immediately below the head 76 of the stud member 74.

The stud member 74 has a bore 138 which opens through the head 76. Extending down through the bore 138 is a removable extension 140 of the valve stem 104. The extension 14!) passes through an opening 142 in the bar 134 and is provided with a head 144 which underlies the bar 134. Also disposed within the bore 138 is a coil spring 146 which extends between the bar 134 and the valve stem 104 so as to normally retain the relief valve 106 in an open position.

The actuator rod 128 is normally retained in an inoperative position by means of a coil spring 148. The coil spring 148 has the lower end thereof bearing against a washer 150 which in turn rests against the outwardly turned upper end 124 of the sleeve 118. The upper end of the spring 148 compressibly engages a washer 152 carried by the actuator rod 128 and limited in upward movement by a pin 154.

The air supply line 28 is provided at the lower end thereof with a suitable fitting 156. The fitting 156 is threadedly engaged in an internally threaded upper portion 158 of an air supply passage 160 formed in the upper end member 52 in diametrically opposite relation to the bore 116.

The mechanism at the bottom of the valve 24 is normally encased in a cover 162. The cover 162 is held in place by suitable fasteners 164 which are removably threadably engaged with the lower end member 44.

At this time it is pointed out that while the diameter of the body member 40 has been illustrated as being the same as that of the barrel 18, when it is desired to use the valve 24 and larger bore mortars, it is merely necessary to provide the housing 38 with an adapter ring (not shown) which will center it with respect'to the larger bore barrel.

In the operation of the training unit 22, the regulator 32 is set at the desired pressure and the valve 166 of the compressed air storage tank 34 is opened. This will then result in the supplying of air to the air supply chamber 58 under the desired predetermined pressure. The pressure, of course, will depend upon the facilities available and will control generally the range of the flight of the projectile 36.

These preliminary steps having been taken, the mortar 10 is operated in the conventional manner with the smaller projectiles 36 being dropped into the smaller barrel 26 of the training unit 22. In order that the projectile 36 may be effectively projected from the barrel 26, it is necessary that the projectile 36 have a relatively close fit with respect to the barrel 26. Thus as the projectile 36 is dropped into the barrel 26, air pressure would normally build up in the lower end of the barrel 26 unless vented. Thus the relief valve 106, being in its open position, permits the air to flow out through the lower end of the barrel 26 down through the bore 102, through the lower end member 44 and back up through the sleeve 118. When the projectile 36 reaches the lower end of, the barrel 26, it engages the head 108 of. the relief valve 106 andmoves it downwardly so that it forms a seal with the valve seat 110 thus closing the bore 102. Further downward movement of the projectile 36 results in the downward movement of the valve member 90 to the position illustrated in Figure 3. In this position the discharge ports 88 are uncovered and as a result, the air stored under pressure in the chamber 58 is immediately discharged into the lower end of the barrel 26 so as to project the projectile 36 therefrom. It is to be understood that the volume of air disposed Within the chamber 58 will be sufiicient to project the projectile 36 from the barrel 26 and the valve does not rely upon the flow of air into the chamber 58 through the air supply line 28 at this time. It is merely necessary that the air supply line 28 be cap-able of recharging the chamber 58 in between the firing of projectiles.

As soon as the pressure within the lower end of the barrel 26 is reduced, the relief valve 106 and the valve member 90 Will return to their normal positions of Figure 2 and the training unit 22 is ready for receiving another projectile.

The manual actuator rod 128 is normally not used during the firing operation of a projectile. However, in the event the projectile for some reason or another does not open the valve member 90, then the valve member 99 may be moved to an open position by pulling the relief valve 106 down utilizing the actuator rod 128. Further, when it is no longer desired to use the training unit 22, the valve 166 of the supply tank 34 is closed after which the valve 24 is manually opened and all of the compressed air in the valve 24 and the supply lines is exhausted.

From the foregoing description of the valve 24, it will be seen that there has been developed a very simple valve which may be mass produced and at the same time will provide controlled volumes of air to be discharged into a barrel, such as the barrel 26 at each operation.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly, all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. A controlled volume blast valve for a pneumatic projectile projector, said valve comprising a housing including a body member and upper and lower end members defining an air storage area, a sleeve extending between said upper and lower end members through said air storage area, air discharge ports in said sleeve, a valve member slidably mounted in said sleeve and sealed relative to said sleeve for controlling air flow through said discharge ports, an opening in said upper end member aligned with said sleeve, said valve member projecting into said opening, means on said upper end member for securing a barrel thereto in alignment with said opening whereby when said valve member is depressed by a projectile placed in said barrel, a controlled volume blast of air will be directed through said opening and into the barrel to project said projectile, and an air inlet fitting on said housing, an air pressure relieving bore through said valve member, a valve seat on the upper end of said valve member surrounding said air pressurerelieving bore, a relief valve, said relief valve including a stem passing through said air pressure relieving bore with clearance to permit the flow of air and a head normally disposed above said valve member and seatable on said valve seat to close said air pressure relieving bore.

2. A controlled volume blast valve for a pneumatic projectile projector, said valve comprising a housing including a body member and upper and lower end members defining an air storage area, a sleeve extending between said upper and lower end members through said air storage area, air discharge ports in said sleeve, a valve member slidably mounted in said sleeve and sealed relative to said sleeve for controlling air flow through said discharge ports, an opening in said upper end member aligned with said sleeve, said valve member projecting into said opening, means on said upper end member for securing a barrel thereto in alignment with said opening whereby when said valve member is depressed by a projectile placed in said barrel, a controlled volume blast of air will be directed through said opening and into the barrel to project said projectile, and an air inlet fitting on said housing, an air pressure relieving bore through said valve member, a valve seat on the upper end of said valve member surrounding said air pressure relieving bore, a relief valve, said relief valve including a stem passing through said air pressure relieving bore with clearance to permit the flow of air, a head normally disposed above said valve member and seatable on said valve seat to close said air pressure relieving bore, and individual springs engaging said valve member and said relief valve and normally retaining said valve member in a closed position and said relief valve in an open position.

3. A controlled volume blast valve for a pneumatic projectile projector, said valve comprising a housing including a body member and upper and lower end members defining an air storage area, a sleeve extending between said upper and lower end members through said air storage area, air discharge ports in said sleeve, a

valve member slidably mounted in said sleeve and sealed relative to said sleeve for controlling air flow through said discharge ports, an opening in said upper end member aligned with said sleeve, said valve member projecting into said opening, means on said upper end member for securing a barrel thereto in alignment with said opening whereby when said valve member is depressed by a projectile placed in said barrel, a controlled volume blast of air will be directed through said opening and into the barrel to project said projectile, and an air inlet fitting on said housing, an air pressure relieving bore through said valve member, a valve seat on the upper end of said valve member surrounding said air pressure relieving bore, a relief valve, said relief valve including a stem passing through said air pressure relieving bore with clearance to permit the flow of air, a head normally disposed above said valve member and seatable on said valve seat to close said air pressure relieving bore, and a manual actuator connected to said relief valve stem, said manual actuator including an operating rod extending through and supported by said upper and lower end members, and a handle disposed remote from said housing.

4. In combination with a mortar barrel, a pneumatic projectile projector, said projector comprising a housing including a body member and upper and lower end members defining an air storage area, a practice barrel secured to a central portion of said upper end member, means secured to said housing supporting said projector within said mortar barrel with said practice barrel being disposed coaxial with said mortar barrel, a sleeve extending between said upper and lower end members through said air storage area, air discharge ports in said sleeve, a valve member slidably mounted in said sleeve and sealed relative to said sleeve for controlling air flow through said discharge ports, an opening in said upper end member aligned with said sleeve and opening into said practice barrel, said valve member projecting into said opening, an air inlet fitting on said housing, an air line extending from said housing through the space between said practice barrel and said mortar barrel and out through the end of said mortar barrel, an air pressure relieving bore on said valve member, a valve seat on the upper end of said valve member surrounding said air pressure relieving bore, a relief valve, said relief valve including a stem passing through said air pressure relieving bore with clearance to permit the flow of air, and a head normally disposed above said valve member and seatable on said valve seat to close said air pressure relieving bore, said relief valve projecting above said upper end member andinto said practice barrel for engagement by a projectile to operate said projectile projector automatically upon the dropping of a projectile into said practice barrel.

5. In combination'with a mortar barrel, a pneumatic projectile projector, said projector comprising a'housing including a body member and upper and lower end members defining an air storage area, a practice barrel secured to a central portion of said upper end member, means secured to said housing supporting said projector Within said mortar barrel with said practice barrel being disposed coaxial with-said mortar barrel, a sleeve extending between said upper and lower end members through said air storage area, air discharge ports in said sleeve, a valve member slidably mounted in said sleeve and sealed relative to:said sleeve for controlling air flow throughsaid discharge ports, an opening in said upper end member aligned with said sleeve and opening into said practice barrel, said valve member projecting into said opening, an air inlet fitting on said housing, an air line extending from said housing through the space between said practice barrel and said mortar barrel and out through the end of said mortar barrel, an air pressure relieving bore on said valve member, a valve seat on the upper end of said valve member surrounding said air pressure relieving bore, a relief valve, said relief valve including a stem passing through said air pressure relieving bore with clearance to permit the flow of air, a head normally disposed above said valve member and seatable on said valve seat to close said air pressure relieving bore, said relief valve projecting above said upper end member and into said practice barrel for engagement by a projectile to operate said projectile projector automatically upon the dropping of a projectile into said practice barrel, and a manual actuator for said valve member, said manual actuator being connected to said valve stem and including an operating rod extending in the space between said practice barrel and said mortar barrel, said operating rod terminating in a handle disposed above and exteriorly of said mortar barrel.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 495,767 Winans Apr. 18, 1893 2,713,859 Bradfield July 26, 1955 2,809,624 Beoher et a1 Oct. 15, 1957

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US495767 *Oct 24, 1889Apr 18, 1893 Thomas j
US2713859 *Feb 9, 1953Jul 26, 1955Bradfield Elmer HSlidable magazine for fluid pressure gun
US2809624 *Jul 26, 1954Oct 15, 1957Dellenbarger Machine Company IMissile firing trainer device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3496925 *Jul 24, 1967Feb 24, 1970Us NavySonobuoy launcher
US7694452 *Aug 27, 2007Apr 13, 2010Croisetiere Leo RBait launcher
Classifications
U.S. Classification124/73, 137/588
International ClassificationF41B11/00, F16K31/00, F41A33/00
Cooperative ClassificationF16K31/003, F41A33/00, F41B11/00
European ClassificationF41B11/00, F16K31/00D, F41A33/00