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Publication numberUS2961676 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 29, 1960
Filing dateJun 20, 1955
Priority dateJun 20, 1955
Publication numberUS 2961676 A, US 2961676A, US-A-2961676, US2961676 A, US2961676A
InventorsAdolph Rebernak, Chester Michaels Eugene
Original AssigneeAmerican Marietta Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Angularly-supported sponge mop
US 2961676 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 29, 1960 A. REBERNAK ElAL ANGULARLY-SUPPORTED SPONGE MOP Filed June 20. 1955 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 fi INVENZZRdSJ BY gfiia kahm ATTORNEYS.

Nov. 29, 1960 A. REBERNAK ETAL 2,961,676

ANGULARLY-SUPPORTED SPONGE MOP Filed June 20, 1955 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 24 Maw/ 4 ATTORNEKS.

Nov. 29, 1960 A. REBERNAK ETAL 2,961,676

ANGULARLY-SUPPORTED SPONGE MOP Filed June 20, 1955 s Sheets-Sheet a INVENTORS' B ggwzeim ATTOR Y5.

2,961,676 ANGULARLY-SUPPORTED SPONGE MOP Adolph Rebernak, Western Springs, and Eugene Chester Michaels, Chicago, Ill., assignors to American-Marietta Company, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Filed June 20, 1955, Ser. No. 516,514 4 Claims. (Cl. 15 -119) This invention relates to an angularly-supported sponge mop, and more particularly to a sponge mop equipped with means for compressing the mop to squeeze the moisture therefrom while at the same time supporting the sponge body of the mop at an angle to the handle during the mopping operation.

An object of the present invention is to provide a sponge mop in which the sponge body is normally supported in a fiat position upon the floor while the handle extends therefrom at a convenient angle for the mopping operation, while at the same time providing means for squeezing the mop body to remove the contained liquid, etc. A further object is to provide in such a mop structure means for maintaining the mop body in a tilted position with respect to the handle while restoring the mop body to a nontilted position in the final squeezing operation. A still further object is to provide a mop in which a relatively wide and thin sponge is employed and supported in such a manner as to rest in a flat position upon the floor while the handle of the mop is inclined at an angle from the mop head for easy manipulation of the sponge in its flat position upon the floor, means being provided for folding the mop body upon itself to squeeze the moisture therefrom and in the latter action to bring the sponge portions into general alignment with the handle. Yet another object is to provide in such a structure rotary hinge means whereby the sponge body and the supporting parts therefor may be tilted with respect to the handle during the mopping and squeezing operations. Still another object is to provide a sponge mop which gives a large floor area while at the same time utilizing a relatively thin sponge and providing means for so compressing the sponge in a single plane that it can be wrung effectively without distortion. A still further object is to provide a sponge having a relatively large floor-contacting area which may be effectively wrung while at the same time maintaining the handle of the mop at an effective working angle in the neighborhood of 45. Other specific objects and advantages will appear as the specification proceeds.

The invention is shown, in illustrative embodiments, by the accompanying drawings, in which- Figure 1 is a perspective view of a sponge mop and operating mechanism therefor embodying our invention; Fig. 2, a broken side View in elevation; Fig. 3, a side view in elevation showing the mop body folded upon itself and in the process ofbeing squeezed; Fig. 4, a broken perspective view of the mop structure with the sponge body resting upon the floor in mopping position; Fig. 5, a broken perspective view showing the sponge body in folded and partly compressed conditionas the water is being removed; Fig. 6, a broken detail sectional view, the section being taken as indicated at line 66 of Fig. 2; Fig. 7, a perspective view of a modified form of mop embodying our invention; Fig. 8, a broken sectional view, the section being taken as indicated at line 88 of Fig. 7; and Fig. 9, a broken side view in elevaatent G 2,961,676 Patented Nov. 29, 1960 tion showing the sponge body folded upon itself and in the process of being compressed for the removal of liquid.

In the illustration given in Figs. 1 to 6, inclusive, 10 designates a mop handle having its lower end pivotally connected to a mop head 11. In the specific'illustration given, the handle is formed of two parts, an upper part 10a formed of wood, or the like, and a lower part 10b formed of metal, or other suitable material. The two handle parts are preferably threadably connected and an operating tube 12, equipped with a handle portion 13, encloses the handle parts, the tube or actuating handle 12 being equipped with connections, which will later be described, for manipulating the mop parts for squeezing the mop body.

The handle portion 10b is pivotally connected by the pivot pin 14 to the upwardly-struck cars 15 of the head 11, as shown best in Fig. 6. As seen in Fig. 6 and also in Figs. 2 and 3, a coil spring 16 extends about the pivot pin 14 and has one leg portion 16a engaging the head 11 and a vertical leg portion 16b engaging the handle part 10b, the spring being stressed so as to maintain the handle part 10b normally in the angular position illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2, which is in the neighborhood of a 45 angle. It will be understood that the angle can be varied from the suggested 45 angle to adapt it for convenient operation by the user.

The head 11 has front and rear flanges 17 turned upwardly and the same are provided with slots 18, as shown best in Fig. 6. As seen from Fig. 2, the rear flange 17 acts as a stop means to determine the angle at which handle portion 10b and head 11 are positioned under the urging of coil spring 16.

Base or hinge plates 19 are connected to the head 11 by means of pivot pins 20 which extend through the inner portions of the plates 19 and through the slots 18. Each of the plates 19 is preferably provided with side flanges 21 extending upwardly and at their outer ends are apertured to receive threaded studs 23 whereby the plates may be anchored through the means of wing nuts 22 to the sponge body 24.

The sponge body 24, which may be formed of cellulose, sponge rubber, fabric, or any suitable material, is preferably provided with a pair of spaced metal plates 25 covered with canvas or other fabric 26, the plate and canvas being anchored to the top of the sponge by adhesive. Usually plate 25 is provided with threaded stud 23 which extends through the fabric 26 and an opening in the plate 19 and is engaged by wing nut 22 by which the parts are securely anchored together. Since the sponge assembly structure is well known, a detailed description herein is believed unnecessary.

For manipulating the hinge or pressure plates 19 in the compression of the sponge body, toggle links are provided between the handle tube 12 andthe plates 19, the arrangement being such that the plates may rotate angularly with respect to the toggle links as they are manipulated. As shown in the illustration, the handle tube 12 is provided at its bottom with a flared fitting 27, to which are secured by rivets or other means the diagonally-extending links 28. The lower ends of the rails 28 are each pivotally connected to a short link member 29, which has integral diverging legs 30. The legs 30 straddle a cylindrical disk 31, which is pivotally mounted by pivot pin 32 upon a pair of spaced cars 33 which are preferably struck upwardly from the metal of each hinge plate 19. It will be noted that the pivot 32 is in alignment with the central pivot pin 14 which connects th handle 10 to the head plate 11.

A coil spring 34 is extended about one end of the pivot pin 30a which connects the legs 30 of the link 29 with 3 the disk 31. As will be seen from Figs. 4 and 5, the spring portion 36 which extends upwardly is confined against outward movement by link member 29, and the spring portion 35 w 'ch extends inwardly thus tends to press the inner portion of each plate 19 downwardly and thereby maintains each plate 19 normally in a flat pla'ne. Movement of the inner ends of the plates 19 in a doomward direction is limited by the head 11 and the pivots 20. It will be observed that the springs 34 carried by the plates 19 tend to maintain the plates in the horizontally-aligned position desired for the mopping operation, while at the same time these springs yield to permit squeezing of the mop when the plates 19 are moved toward each other, as illustrated in Fig. 5, and it will be noted further that the coil spring 16 on'the pivoted handle tends to maintain the handle for the mopping operation normally at an angle of about 45 with respect to the mop body 24.

Operation In the operation of the structure, the sponge body 24 is normally maintained in the flat position illustrated best in Fig. 1, while the handle 10' extending upwardly and rearwardly therefrom is maintained at a convenient angle for operation generally in the neighborhood of 45. By means of the springs 16 and 34, the operating parts are maintained in a firm and relatively rigid condition so that the mop can be manipulated by the user in an effective mopping operation, the fiat sponge 24 being moved forwardly and rearwardly across the floor with the full face of the sponge in contact with the floor. When it is desired to wring the mop, the handle tube portion 13 is pressed downwardly, while the handle 10 is held in the other hand of the user and this causes the parts to move to the position shown best in Fig. 5. In this manner, a uniform squeezing of the folded sponge body 24 is brought about. In the latter operation, the sponge body 24 turns from its angular position, as shown in Fig. l, to a position in which the folded sponge portions 24 are in longitudinal alignment with the mop handle 10, as illustrated in Fig. 3. The rotary disks 31 mounted upon pivot pins 32 rotate to permit the toggle links 28 and 29 to move to the aligned position shown in Figs. 3 and 5, while in the same operation, each link 29 is free to rotate about the pin 30a. Such connections permit the sponge 24 and its supporting plate structure to move from the angular position shown in Figs. 1 and 2, to the non-angular position at which the handle 10 is perpendicular to the sponge body 24 or, expressing it in another Way, in which the folded parts of the sponge body, as illustrated in Fig. 5, are longitudinally aligned with the mop handle 10.

After the sponge has been thoroughly squeezed in the foregoing operation, the parts may be restored to their normal positions, as illustrated in Fig. l, and in this operation the spring 16 causes the handle automatically to move to the angular position illustrated in Fig. 1 and the springs 34 cause the plate members 19 to move to their longitudinally-aligned position for maintaining the sponge body in its fiat, floor-engaging position.

In the modification illustrated in Figs. 7, 8 and 9, the structure is very similar to that shown in Figs. 1 to 6, inclusive, the difference residing mainly in the spring means employed for maintaining the parts in the angular relation shown. In the structure illustrated in Figs. 7 to 9, inclusive, the tubular handle 37 is provided with a transverse pin 38 forming an abutment for the upper end of a compression spring 29. The lower end of the spring is supported by a cross-pin 40 carried by the lower end of the mop handle 41. By this means, the handle portion 41 is normally urged downwardly with respect to the operating handle 37. The lower end of the handle 41 is provided with a slot 42 which receives the pivot pin 43 carried by spaced ears 44 welded to the head plate 45. A link 46 pivotally connects the boss 47 on the lower handle portion 41 to the boss 48 carried by each of the cars 44, as illustrated best in Fig. 8.

For maintaining the handle generally at an angle of about 45", we employ a spring 49 which is connected at its upper end to the handle part 41 and at its lower end to the head plate 45. Instead of striking segments from the plates 19a to form the supporting ears for the toggle links, we weld the ears to the plates. In other respects, the structure is very similar to that already described and shown in Figs. 1 to 6, inclusive In operation, the spring 39 normally urges the lower handle part 41 downwardly, while the toggle links 28a and 29a, through their connections with the plates 19a, restrain downward movement of the plates. When the handle tube member 37 is pressed downwardly, the spring 39 is compressed while yielding to permit the plates 19a to be moved together, in the manner heretofore described in connection with Figs. 1 to 6, for the squeezing of the mop body. At the same time, the spring 49 elongates. After the squeezing operation, the parts are returned to their original position, the spring 39 serving to align the plates 19a with the head 45 while the spring 49 draws the handle 41 to an-angle of about 45 with respect to the sponge body 50.

While, in the foregoing specification, we have set forth specific structures in considerable detail for the purpose of illustrating our invention, it will be understood that such specific structures may be varied widely by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of our invention.

We claim:

1. In a mop structure, an elongated sponge body, a head resting upon said body, squeeze plates pivotally connected to said head and secured to said body, and a handle pivotally connected to said head, a slide handle mounted on said first-mentioned handle, toggle links connecting said sliding handle to said plates, stop means on one of said handle and head, and spring means cooperating with said stop means to normally yieldably urge said handle to an angle in the neighborhood of 45 with respect to said head but permitting said handle to move to a vertical position with respect to said head when said slide handle is manipulated for squeezing said sponge, the pivotal connection of said squeeze plates to said head comprising pivot pin and slot connections, said pin and slot connections permitting lateral shifting of the inner ends of said squeeze plates away from one another when said sliding handle is moved to press the squeeze plates about the sponge to fold it upon itself, said lateral shifting of the inner ends of the squeeze plates being in addition to any lateral component of movement of said ends caused by rotation of said plates about their respective pin and slot connections, each of said connections serving at least during the latter part of the wringing operation as the fulcrum against which its associated squeeze plate bears to apply wringing pressure to the sponge compressed between said plates.

2. A compression mop, comprising an elongated sponge body, a head resting upon said body and having side flanges provided with spaced slots, a pair of spaced plates secured to said sponge body and having their inner ends connected to said head by pivot pins extending through said slots, said pin and slot connections between said mop head and plates permitting lateral shifting of the inner ends of said plates away from one another when the sponge is folded upon itself during the wringing operation, said lateral shifting of the inner ends of the plates being in addition to any lateral component of movement of said ends caused by rotation of said plates about their respective pin and slot connections, each of said pin and slot connections serving at least during the latter part of the wringing operation as the fulcrum against which its associated plate bears to apply wringing pressure to the sponge compressed between said plates, a handle pivotally mounted upon said mop head, spring means yieldably urging said handle and said mop head into a position of about 45 with respect to" each other,

a slide handle mounted upon said first-mentioned handle, toggle links connecting said slide handle and said spaced plates, universal joint connections between said toggle links and said plates, and spring means carried by said toggle links and said plates for normally yieldably urging said plates into horizontally-aligned positions.

3. A mop structure comprising an elongated mop body adapted to rest upon a floor, a mop head positioned above said mop body, a handle pivotally secured to said mop head, cooperating spring means on said handle and mop head and stop means on one of said handle and mop head for yieldably maintaining said handle normally at a predetermined angle with respect to said mop head, squeeze plates mounted upon said mop body on either side of said mop head, lost motion connections between said head and squeeze plates, said lost motion connections permitting lateral shifting of the inner ends of said squeeze plates away from one another when the mop body is folded upon itself during the wringing operation, said lateral shifting of the inner ends of the squeeze plates being in addition to any lateral component of movement of said ends caused by rotation of said plates about their respective lost motion connections, each of said lost motion connections serving at least during the latter part of the wringing operation as the fulcrum against which its associated squeeze plate bears to apply wringing pressure to the mop body compressed between said plates, a sliding handle mounted upon said first mentioned handle, toggle links carried by said sliding handle and connected by universal joints to said plates, said lost motion connections maintaining continuous wringing pressure upon said squeeze plates when said sliding handle is moved to compress said squeeze plates about said mop body to fold it upon itself, and spring means carried by said toggle links and squeeze plates pressing upon said plates and normally yieldably maintaining them in horizontal alignment with said mop head.

4. In a mop structure, an elongated mop body adapted to rest upon a floor, a mop head positioned at the longitudinal center of said body, a pair of mop plates secured to said mop body and pivotally attached to said mop head by means of lost motion connections, said lost motion connections permitting lateral shifting of the inner ends of said mop plates away from one another when the mop body is folded upon itself during the wringing operation, said lateral shifting of the inner ends of the mop plates being in addition to any lateral component of movement of said ends caused by rotation of said plates about their respective lost motion connections, each of said lost motion connections serving at least during the latter part of the wringing operation as the fulcrum against which its associated mop plate bears to apply wringing pressure to the mop body compressed between said plates, a mop handle pivotally secured to said mop head, cooperating spring means on said handle and mop had and stop means on one of said handle and mop head for yieldably urging said handle normally to a predetermined inclination away from the perpndicular with respect to said mop head and body, an actuating handle associated with said mop handle, and links connecting said actuating handle and said mop plates for compressing said mop body upon itself against the force of said spring means.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,222,971 Moe Apr. 17, 1917 1,437,789 Whyte Dec. 5, 1922 1,771,325 Cotter July 22, 1930 2,093,052 Muckenhirn Sept. 14, 1937 2,460,763 Oakhill Feb. 1, 1949 2,730,743 Zottola Jan. 17, 1956 2,834,974 Greenleaf May 20, 1958 2,864,107 Greenleaf Dec. 16, 1958 FOREIGN PATENTS 2,504 Great Britain of 1912 53,091 Denmark May 3, 1937 76,184 Norway Jan. 30, 1950 197,619 Great Britain May 17, 1923 216,565 Germany Nov. 24, 1909 466,474 Canada July 11, 1950 496,850 Belgium July 31, 1950 617,197 Germany Aug. 14, 1935

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1222971 *Jul 31, 1916Apr 17, 1917George MoeBrush.
US1437789 *Feb 3, 1921Dec 5, 1922Whyte Isabella BMop
US1771325 *Jan 25, 1928Jul 22, 1930Cotter John RAdjustable handle
US2093052 *Apr 25, 1936Sep 14, 1937Peco Holding Mij N VMop
US2460763 *Dec 6, 1946Feb 1, 1949Cedar Corp N OMop structure
US2730743 *Jan 12, 1953Jan 17, 1956Empire Brushes IncButterfly type sponge mops
US2834974 *Oct 15, 1954May 20, 1958Sponge Products CorpSponge mop having spring operator
US2864107 *Aug 23, 1954Dec 16, 1958Sponge Products CorpSelf-wringing mop construction
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4322865 *Sep 18, 1980Apr 6, 1982Von Meyer Robert FPneumatic sponge mop
US5979004 *May 15, 1998Nov 9, 1999Wilson; Frank G.Wringer mops with pivoting mop heads
US6119297 *Oct 26, 1998Sep 19, 2000Leifheit AgWet mop for planar surfaces
US6698056 *Jul 28, 1998Mar 2, 2004E. D. Oates Pty Ltd.Butterfly sponge mop with angle-adjustable handle
US6844493May 19, 2003Jan 18, 2005Clinton R. StrongRaceway for providing power and communications connectivity
US20100313370 *Nov 11, 2009Dec 16, 2010Ming-Hsien LinCleaning apparatus with tiltable cleaning head
CN103961020A *Feb 25, 2014Aug 6, 2014电子科技大学Multifunctional household cleaning tool
EP3020316A1 *Aug 8, 2013May 18, 2016Jiaxing Jackson Travel Products Co., Ltd.Self-wrung flat plate mop
WO1999059459A1 *Dec 22, 1998Nov 25, 1999Wilson Frank GWringer mops with pivoting mop heads
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/119.2, 15/244.2, 15/144.1
International ClassificationA47L13/10, A47L13/146
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/146
European ClassificationA47L13/146