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Publication numberUS2961780 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 29, 1960
Filing dateApr 3, 1958
Priority dateApr 3, 1958
Publication numberUS 2961780 A, US 2961780A, US-A-2961780, US2961780 A, US2961780A
InventorsRoger F Mcmanus
Original AssigneeRoger F Mcmanus
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bottom filler for welt shoes
US 2961780 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 29, 1960 R. F. MCMANUs 2,961,780

BOTTOM FILLER FOR WELT sHoEs Filed April s, 1958 2 sheds-sheet 1 INVENTOR.

BY /yt 7M Nov. 29, 1960 R. F. MCMANUS 2,961,780

BOTTOM FILLER FORWELT SHOES Filed April 5, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INV ENTOR.

/79 f. new

s l 2,961,780 Patented NOV- 29, 1960 BOTTGM FILLER FOR WELT SHOES Roger F. McManus, '31 Richmond St., Weymouth 88, Mass.

Filed Apr. '3, 1958, Ser. No. 726,232

5 Claims. (Cl. '36-71) This invention relates to the bottom construction of hoes and more particularly comprises a new and irn- 'pr'oved ller for shoes of welt construction. This apiplioation is a continuation-in-p-art of my copending application Serial No. 699,707, iled in the United States Patent Oce on November 29, 1957, now abandoned.

My invention is intended to be used in conjunction with the `usual insole and to replace ground cork 'and binder and other composition ller as well as fillers made of either resilient or solid rubber, plastic or other materiads. Because very lightweight insole material is practical and economical and because the filler is adhesively positioned, no -added cost is contemplated in the practice ofmy invention. Rather, there is a likelihood that an ,economical advantage will be derived lfrom the practice of 'my invention. One important object of my invention is to provide a support Iand corrective for weak arches with otherwise normal or near normal bone structure and alignment. The two major weight carrying points of the foot, namely, the iirst metatarsal-phal'ange joint and the great toe, are partially locked or positioned in cavities on a lower plane than the smaller -forepart bones, thus preventing eversion ina normal foot and urging correct bone alignment in a weakened foot. In the area between the inner and outer metatarsal-phal-ange joints, the iiller is so sloped as to provide a positive transverse 'arch for support of all of the metatarsal-phalange joints.

'A more specific object of my invention is to provide a ller which prevents the displacement or dropping of the cuboid bone which eifects the alignment and function of 'the tarsal, as well as the internal and external long arches. 'As a result, the internal metatarsal-p'halange joint functionsV on a lower plane than is conventional, and a corresponding rise is effected for support of the cu-boid and a rise as well as an arch is effected for the support of the metatarsal bones. The cavities and sloped lateral arches of my filler in combination `are designed to prevent ever- 'sion of the foot` and to Vurge and correct bone alignment. The cavities and generally longitudinally sloped arches are designed to prevent eversion and to urge and correct bone alignment. The weight of the body is urged in- 'wardly towards the two forward weight carrying points. Furthermore, the forward arches are supported while the weight yat'the ankle-cuboid area is urged outwardly on to theextern-al longitudinal arch which is the bodys great Weight carrier. i

#To accomplish these andother objects my invention includes-among its important features a lightweight, solid 'and rather exible filler which ills the cavity on the bottom of the insole defined by the insole inseam rib, whether it be a channeledlip or superimposed rib or of any other variety. This liller preferably is made ofa moldable material such as plastic and in shape generally conforms to the inseam rib cavity. ln one embodiment of my invention, a pair of cavities, either molded or cut into the side ofthe -illerl from its inner edge at the ball and great toe areas,permit-the ball and great toe areas of the foot vto lie somewhat lower than the other portions of the foot. The thickness o-f the filler -decreases smoothly toward the areas of the cavity. The decreasing thickness is brought about by the tapered surfaces formed on the top and bottom of the ller which converge toward one another and merge at the periphery of the cavity.

Grooves are formed on the bottom and top of the filler about the cavities on the tapered surfaces. These grooves form break lines in the filler to allow the lower tapered surfaces to lie flush on the upper surface of the outsole when the pressure of the foot is applied against it. To reduce the weight of the filler, its entire surface may be substantially covered with a lattice of perforations or lateral grooves.

Shoes which incorporate my ller arg manufactured in accordance with ordinary practice, that is, the upper is lasted to the insole and the welt is sewn (inseaming) on through the upper' and insole lip or rib. The excess upper is trimmed away and the welt beaten down, thereby forming a raised area about the periphery extending to the lfront of the heel area. The lower area Within this periphery (insole cavity) requires a filler to eifect generally equal height with the described periphery for the reception of the outsole and the attachment thereof.

In a number of other embodiments of my invention, two layers of material are employed to make up the ller. In these embodiments, the upper ply has formed therein either Ia pair of cavities yas described above or one large cavity which extends over the inner side of the forepart of the filler. This upper ply may be made of a rather solid and flexible material while the lower ply which is uncut is made of any compressible sheet material.

In still another embodiment of my invention, the filler is made up of two separate yand distinct sections lying in the same plane. One section, made of a rather solid ma` terial, conforms generally to the forepart of the foot but has a single enlarged cavity along the inner side in the area of the great toe and the inner ball of the foot. The second section lls the cavity `formed in the first section and is made of resilient material such as ground cork or rubber.

These `and other objects and features of my invention along with its incident advantages will be better under'- stood and appreciated from the following detailed description of several embodiments thereof, selected for purposes of illustration and shown in the accompanying drawing in which:

Figure l is a cross sectional view of a common welt shoe constructed in -accordance with the prior art and suggests the normal arch o-f the foot across the metatarsalphalange joints; Y

Figure 2 is a cross sectional view of a welt shoe incorporating one embodiment of my invention and suggests the positive matrix-like support contributed by the liller;

Figure 3' is a plan View of one embodiment of my invention;

Figure 4 is a cross sectional view taken along the corresponding section line in Figure 3;

Y Figure 5 is a cross sectional view' showing the iiller disposed between the insole and the outsole before the pressure of the foot is applied to the assembly;

Figure 6 is a plan view of a second embodiment of-a filler constructed in accordance with my invention;

Figure 7 is an exploded cross sectional view of the filler shown in Figure 6;

Figure 8 is a cross sectional view taken along the corresponding section line in Figure 6;

Figure 9 is a plan view of still another embodiment of my invention;

Figure l0 is a cross sectional view taken along the corresponding section line in Figure 9 and showing the upper ply of the laminated filler; and

Figure 11 is a Vcross sectional view taken along the corresponding section line in Figure 9.

In Figure l I have shown a normal foot housed in a newly manufactured ordinary welt shoe. In Figure 2 I have shown the manner in which the transverse metatarsal-phalange heads are supported in a welt shoe which includes a filler constructed in accordance with my invention. In these figures, the shoes illustrated include an upper 20, on insole 22, a rib or lip 24, a welt 26, and an outsole 28. The reader will note that the filler shown in the shoe illustrated in Figure 1 is replaced in the embodiment of my invention shown in Figure 2 by a specially formed filler 32. In each shoe, an inseam 34 secures the insole, welt and upper together while the row of lockstitching 36 unites the outsole 28 and the welt 26. The filler 32 in cooperation with the insole 22 forms a matrix-like support for the foot as illustrated in detail in Figure 2.

The filler 32 is preferably molded out of a rather solid but flexible plastic material in the general shape of the cavity defined by the insole inseam rib or lip. As shown in Figure 4, the filler 32 is of generally uniform thickness from front to rear but gradually reduces in thickness from the outer to the inner edge across its width. Cavities or relief-portions 38 and 40 are formed in the filler along its inner edge 42 at the location of the inside ball and great toe, respectively. These cavities are in the form of rounded cut-outs and have curved inner edges. The filler gradually increases in thickness away from the cavities. This configuration is achieved by tapered surfaces 44 and 46 adjacent the cavity 38 on the top and bottom of the filler, respectively, and tapered surfaces 48 and 50 on the top and bottom of the filler adjacent the cavity 40. These converging pairs of surfaces generally extend to the outside edge of the filler to avoid any abrupt change in the filler thickness. A pair of grooves 52. and 54 approximately %,2 of an inch in depth are formed about the cavity 38 on the tapered surfaces 44 and 46 on the top and bottom of the filler and a similar pair of grooves 56 and 58 are formed about the cavity on the tapered surfaces 48 and 50. As will be more fully explained below, these grooves permit breaking of the filler so that its lower surface lies fiat upon the outsole when the pressure of the wearers foot is applied to it.

To reduce the weight of the filler and increase its flexibility, its entire body or part of it, may be covered with a lattice of perforations 60 as suggested on various portions of the filler shown in Figure 3. It is to be understood that lateral grooves formed on each surface of the filler could accomplish the same purpose. For reasons of clarity, only a portion of the perforations are shown in Figure 3.

The filler 32 is completed by the formation of tapered surfaces 62 and 64 on its top and bottom at the rear portion of the filler which terminates at the heel-breast area of the shoe. These sloping surfaces 62 and 64 allow the upper surface of the filler to converge smoothly into the upper surface of the heel portion of the insole and thus provide a smooth and effectively unbroken seat for a conventional shank made of steel or other material.

From the foregoing description, it will be appreciated that the top and bottom of the filler shown in Figures 3 and 4 are in all ways identical. The tapered or Vsloping surfaces 44 and 48 formed on the top of the filler and which decline to the periphery of the cavities or relief portions 38 and 40 are duplicated on the bottom of the ller by surfaces 46 and S0. The grooves 52 and S6 formed on the tapered surfaces surrounding the cavities 38 and 40 are mirrored by the grooves 54 and 58 formed on the bottom surface of the filler. Moreover, the sloping surface 62 formed at the heel-breast area of the liller is identical to the sloping surface 64 on the bottom of the filler. Thus, a filler of the type shown in Figures 3 and 4 may be used in a left shoe merely by inverting it. It is suitable for use in a left shoe With all of the characteristics it possesses in the position illustrated.

In Figure 2 I have shown the manner in which the iiller 32 is incorporated into a shoe. After the insole 22 is tacked to the last, the upper 20 is assembled and lasted to the insole, and the welt is stitched on through the upper and rib or lip of the insole (inseaming). The excess upper is then trimmed off and the welt is beaten down. The combined thicknesses of the welt, upper and the insole lip or rib 24 form a raised area about the periphery of the shoe extending to the heel-breast area. This area within the raised periphery is sometimes referred to as the insole cavity. Thereafter, the filler is suitably coated with an adhesive material and is positioned within the insole cavity; the shank is applied and the outsole is laid and secured to the welt.

In Figure 5 I have illustrated the position of the filler 32 between the insole 22 and the outsole 28 immediately after the shoe has been assenbled. It will be noted that the lower tapered surface 24 of the filler does not lie iiat on the upper surface of the outsole 28 but rather lies suspended as suggested at 66. However, when the pressure of the foot is applied to the insole 22, this suspension is eliminated because the pressure causes the filler to break on the grooves 52, 54, 56 and 58 formed in the tapered surfaces. This breaking of the filler causes two depressions or relief portions to form at the areas of the great toe and the inside ball of the foot. This is clearly suggested in Figure 2 where the ball formed at the foreward end of the first metatarsal 68 lies in the depression formed by the cavity 38. The great toe lies in a similar depression formed by the cavity 40 in the filler. In combination with any insole made of lightweight material, my iiller 32 thus mirrors or approximates the contours of the sole of a normal foot. The internal downward tilt assumed by the insole 22 along with the cavities formed therein are intended to insure alignment of two major weight supporting parts, that is, the great toe and internal ball areas, as well as all of the bones of the forepart of the foot. The outside of the foot which functions as a transferrer of weight from the heel to the forepart and as an aid to balance cannot be abused by carrying an unnatural amount of weight.

It should be noted that the straight lline 68 drawn across Figure 2 between the bottom of the cavity 38 and the outside edge of the filler 32 indicates that a lateral rise describing an arch is formed on the forepart of the shoe under the second, third, fourth and fifth metatarsalphalange joints 72, 74 and 76. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that this results in or forms an approximate matrix efficiently supporting and controlling the forepart bones.

In Figure 1 I have shown that a shoe manufactured in accordance with the prior art does not provide a matrixlike support before the shoe is broken in. Almost immediately after the shoe is first placed on the foot, the outer ball as well as the inner ball and great toe sink the iiller 30 so that the lateral arch 78 is supported on the surface of the insole. Thus, a matrix-like support is ultimately formed in the conventional shoe but permits sinking of the outer ball encouraging eversion of the bones of the foot. Distortion of the shoe also results. With my filler, the matrix-like support is achieved wihout eversion and the appearance of the shoe is preserved.

Thus, by employing the filler of my invention, no special lasts, expensive unusual shoe construction, specially designed insoles, biscuits, cookies, pads, arch supports or auxiliaries are necessary. Nothing is added to the shoe, but rather a substitution is made of a novel filler for the ller presently used, and no additional manufacturing costs are incurred. The cubic area for housing the foot is not diminished, the life of the shoe is increased, and its appearance is enhanced for it is substantially impossible'lto.ffroll-overf.the'outside Y vEversion or turning outward of Vthe metatarsals and smaller bones of the foot is preyented'land corrected so that they are in proper alignment in, the various arches for their weight carrying functions. l i/ Ihe embodiment ofl my invention shown in Figure 6 to 8 constitutes a slight modification of the previously described embodiment. The reader will note that the filler is made up` of' two parts 80 and 82, the part 80 generally conforming to the insole cavity but having an enlarged cut-out 84 formed on the inside of its forepart. Thecutout 84 extends from the toe portion of the filler rearwardly about the area of the great toe and the inner ball to a .position slightly forward of the inside long arch. The` top and bottom of the part 80 of the filler about the cut-out 84 -is defined by upper and lower inclined surfaces 86 and 88 on its top and bottom which meet at the periphery of the cut-out 84. Thus, the section 80 gradu- .allyyincreases in thickness in the direction of its outer edge 90. The heel-breast area of part 82 of the filler is also provided with inclined surfaces 92 and 94. Grooves 96 and 98 are also formed in the section 80 on the inclined surfaces 86 and 88 to allow the lower surface to lie fiat on the upper surface of the outsole when the pressure of the foot is applied to the shoe as described fully in connection with the preceding embodiment.

While the part 80 is made of a relatively solid but ilexible material such as plastic or hard rubber, the part 82 which fills the cutout 84 is made of a resilient material such as ground cork or other composition filler. The resilient material 82 is substantially identical in shape to the cut-out 84 but is adapted to overlap the periphery of the cut-out of the part 80 as suggested in Figures 7 and 8. It should be noted also that the outer edge 100 of the part 82 is extremely thin and that the converging surfaces 102 and 104 formed on the top and bottom define an inwardly thickening insert for the cut-out 84.

Thus, when the part 82 is disposed in the cut-out 84 so that the tapered surface 104 overlies and engages the tapered surface 86 of the solid part 80, the filler has a generally uniform cross section. However, when the weight 'of the foot is applied to the insole, the resilient portion 82 of the filler compresses at the areas of the great toe and inner ball, and in effect provides the same contours as the embodiment shown in Figure 3. It should also be recognized that because the tapered surfaces 86 and 88 along with the tapered surfaces 102 and 104 are provided on both parts 80 and 82, it is possible to connect the section 82 so that its outer edge 100 lies either over or under the periphery of the cut-out 84. That is, the surface 104 may be secured to the surface 86 of the part 80 or alternatively the tapered surface 102 may be placed against the similar surface 88 before the two parts are secured together to make up the filler. In this manner the assembly may be selectively used for either a left or a right shoe. It should also be appreciated that the entire filler including each of its parts may be covered with a lattice of perforations or grooves to reduce its weight.

Although I have described in detail the shape of the cut-out 84 and the part 82, it should be understood that their respective shapes are not critical. It is only important that the compressible part 82 lie beneath the inner ball and great toe of the foot and not extend to the region of the outer ball. So long as these conditions are met, the filler will perform its primary functions and provides relief portions for the inside ball and great toe pad of the foot.

The embodiment of my invention shown in Figures 9-11 is very similar to that shown in Figure 3 but includes a second layer of material which serves as a base for the filler. For purposes of clarity, the upper ply of the filler shown in Figure 9 is identified by the same numerals as used in Figure 3 for in all ways the upper ply is identical to that embodiment of my invention. Thus, the upper ply includes cut-out formed relief portions 38 and 40.

However, the ply 52 is shown in its inverted position in Figure 9. Y l

The filler shown in Figures 9-11 in addition to the ply 32 which is identical to that shown in Figure 3 also includes a second ply or layer 110 which is made of a rather resilient material having unbroken surfaces and conforms in outline to the insole cavity. Unlike the ply 32, the layer 110 does not include cavities or tapered surfaces, but rather merely presents a smooth surface upon which the ply 32 is adhesively secured.

A filler made of a form shown in Figures 9-11 may be preferred to the single ply shown in Figure 3. It may be used, just 4as the filler shown in Figure 3, for either a left or a right shoe because the tapered surfaces on the upper ply are each adapted to mate with either surface ofthe lowersection. For reduced weight, grooves or openings may be formed throughout the surface of the unit as suggested in Figure 9.

Although I have illustrated several embodiments of my invention and have suggested the use of particular ma"- terials which may be used in their formation, it is to be understood that various modifications may be made of the materials and shapes suggested to be used in many types of shoes without departing from the spirit of my invention. For example, although the embodiments of my invention illustrated in Figures 6 and 9 are made up of two distinct pieces of material, it is to be understood that the part of the filler shown in Figure 6 and the ply 32 shown in Figure 9 may be used independently of part 82 and ply respectively. That is, the resilient insert 82 which fills the cut-out 84 of the embodiment of Figure 6 may be eliminated in certain applications, and the bottom ply 110 may be dispensed with.

The foregoing description has been confined to several embodiments of my invention which are incorporated into a filler particularly designed for welt shoes. However, those skilled in the art will appreciate that substantially all of the advantages of my invention may be achieved by incorporating its features into a shoe bottom anywhere between the insole and outsole. For example, the depressions for the inner ball and great toe and the firm substantially unyielding support for the outer ball may be incorporated into the midsole of ya stitched down shoe.

Therefore, I do not intend to limit the scope of my invention to the specific embodiments illustrated and described. Rather, it is my intention that the breadth of my invention be determined by the appended claims and their equivalent.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

l. A filler for a shoe comprising a solid sheet of material conforming in outline shape to the outline of the forepart of the foot and terminating rearwardly at the heel breast area of the foot, a pair of cut-outs provided in the sheet at the region of the inside ball of the foot and the pad of the great toe of the foot, and sloping surfaces provided on the top and bottom of the sheet and converging in the direction of the cut-outs, said cut-outs and sloping surfaces defining a transverse arch for the met-atarsal-phalange heads of the foot with the highest point of the arch at the area of the outside ball of the foot and the lowest point of the arch in the area of the inside ball of the foot, whereby the ller is adapted to support the first, second, third, fourth, and fifth metatarsalphalange heads respectively in successively higher planes.

2. A filler for a shoe comprising a solid sheet of material conforming in outline shape to the outline of the forepart of the foot and terminating rearwardly at the heel breast area of the foot, the top and bottom faces of the sheet being identical, a pair of cut-outs provided in the sheet at the region of the inside ball of the foot and the pad of the great toe of the foot, and sloping surfaces provided on the top and bottom faces of the sheet and converging in the direction of the cut-outs, said cut-outs and sloping surfaces defining a transverse arch for the metatarsal-phalange heads of thefoot with the highest point of the arch at the area of the outside ball of the foot and thelowest point of the arch in the area of the inside ball of the foot, whereby the filler is adapted to support the first, second, third, fourth and fifth metatarsalphalange heads respectively in successively higher planes.

3. A `filler as defined in claim 2 further characterized by a second sheet made of compressible material shaped to conform to the forepart of the foot and secured to one of the faces of the first-recited sheet.

4. A filler for a shoe comprising a sheet of material conforming in outline shape to the outline of the forepart of the foot and terminating rearwardly at the heel breast area of the foot, cut-out formed relief portions provided in the sheet at the region of the inside ball of the foot and the pad of the great toe of the foot, and sloping surfaces provided on the top and bottom of the sheet and converging in the direction of the relief portions, said relief portions and sloping surfaces defining a transverse arch for the metatarsal-phalange heads of the foot with the highest point of the arch at the area of the outside ball of the foot and the lowest point of the arch in the area of the inside ball of the foot, whereby the filler is adapted to support the first, second, third,vfourth and fifth metatarsal-phalange heads respectivelyv in successively higher planes. s

5. A filler as defined in claim 4 wherein the upper and lower faces of the sheet are identical.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,757,993 Durkee May 13, 1930 1,960,418 Schaller May 29, 1934 1,976,389 Everston Oct. 9, 1934 1,977,693 Schaller Oct. 23, 1934 2,439,172 La Chapelle Apr. 6, 1948 FOREIGN PATENTS 217,833 Great Britain June 26. 1924

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1757993 *Jul 21, 1928May 13, 1930Durkee Ernest WBoot or shoe
US1960418 *Dec 24, 1930May 29, 1934Schaller JohannesOrthopedic shoe
US1976389 *Jul 28, 1933Oct 9, 1934Everston Joseph HShoe
US1977693 *Apr 25, 1932Oct 23, 1934Arthur A PageFootwear
US2439172 *Mar 13, 1946Apr 6, 1948Albert L La ChapelleShoe forepart bottom filler
GB217833A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3253600 *Sep 6, 1963May 31, 1966William M SchollOrthopedic inlay for footwear
US3253601 *Sep 6, 1963May 31, 1966William M SchollConforming foot cushioning device for footwear
US6131311 *Apr 17, 1998Oct 17, 2000Payless Shoesource, Inc.Insole insert for footwear
US8166674Aug 3, 2009May 1, 2012Hbn Shoe, LlcFootwear sole
US20130227859 *Feb 18, 2011Sep 5, 2013Masatoshi TakayamaFootwear
EP2641495A1 *Feb 18, 2011Sep 25, 2013Masatoshi TakayamaFootwear
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/145, 36/30.00R
International ClassificationA43B7/14
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/14, A43B7/145, A43B7/1425
European ClassificationA43B7/14A20P, A43B7/14A20B, A43B7/14