Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2961986 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 29, 1960
Filing dateApr 19, 1955
Priority dateApr 19, 1955
Publication numberUS 2961986 A, US 2961986A, US-A-2961986, US2961986 A, US2961986A
InventorsRochill William H
Original AssigneeRochill William H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Steering control for outboard motors
US 2961986 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 29, 1960- w. H. ROCKHILL 2,961,986

STEERING CONTROL FOR OUTBOARD MOTORS Filed April 19, 1955 s Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. Wil a/77 HIP 151521]! A ffar/ze N v- 2 1 w. H. ROCKHILL 2,961,986

STEERING CONTROL FOR OUTBOARD MOTORS Filed April 19, 1955 '3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. A 24 14/2 /1512] flEaa b/Z Z5 AWE/we 'Nqv- 1 w. H. ROCKHILL 2,961,986

STEERING CONTROL FOR OUTBOARD MOTORS Filed April 19, 1955 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 FE 5' 4/ l- VIII/l 8' III INVENTOR.

1/10/1151]; Him/{1w 64 h D i 1C6 Patented Nov. 29, 1960 STEERING CONTROL FOR OUTBOARD MOTORS William H. Rockhill, Milwaukee, Wis.

Filed Apr. 19, 1955, Ser. No. 502,276

4 Claims. (Cl. 114-144) This invention relates to a steering control for an outboard motor and more particularly to the type adapted to provide a positive driving connection between the motor and a point of operation remote therefrom.

While several types of steering controls have been used in connection with outboard motors, none have met with overwhelming favor by reason of certain inherent shortcomings which each possesses. Probably the most commonly used steering control, up to the present time, has been the well-known cable type. One of the shortcomings of this type of control resides in the fact that it requires frequent adjustment to take up slack and compensate for stretching of the cable. Another shortcoming of this type of control lies in the fact that the cable must be replaced from time to time as the result of either Wear or breakage. Another type of steering control utilizes hydraulic pressure for efiecting the movement of the outboard motor. One of the shortcomings found in this type of device resides in the ever present problem of maintaining the system free from leakage. Another problem encountered with this type of device results from the change in viscosity of the fluid under widely varying temperature conditions. The existence of either or both of these circumstances in the hydraulic system results in lag or other unfavorable operating conditions.

The primary object of the present invention resides in the provision of a new and improved positive mechanical linkage between a remotely positioned steering wheel and an outboard motor.

Another object of the present invention resides in the provision of a new and improved positive steering control for an outboard motor which is readily adapted for application to virtually all types of motors and makes of boats, either as original equipment or an accessory without requiring the structural modification of either the motor or boat to permit its use.

A further object of the invention resides in the provision of a new and improved steering control for an outboard motor which may be attached to the boat and motor without in any way impairing the appearance or usable passenger accommodating space in the boat.

A further object of the invention resides in the provision of a steering control for an outboard motor which is positive in its action, handles the full steering travel of the motor and does not impair the use of other remote control apparatus with which the outboard motor may be equipped.

Another object of the invention resides in the provision of a new and improved steering control for an outboard motor which simultaneously permits the full tilting of the motor and provides a positive steering connection between a remotely positioned steering wheel and the motor at all times regardless of the vertical angular position of the motor with respect to the boat.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent 2 from the following description of an illustrative embodiment of the present invention.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a view in perspective showing a steering control device, constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention, applied to a boat equipped with a dirigibly mounted outboard motor; I

Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view through the transom of the boat, taken substantially on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1 showing the mounting of the transom block which supports the rear bell crank and also showing the normal driving position of the motor in full lines with the forward tilted position thereof shown in dotted lines;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary elevational view of the structure shown in Fig. 2; t

Fig. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary diagrammatic top plan view of the several components of the steering control;

Fig. 5 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. 4 showing a means for securing the steering control device to the carrying handle of an outboard motor;

Fig. 6 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 6-6 of Fig. 4 showing the means for mounting the rear bell crank on the transom block;

Fig. 7 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 7-7 of 'Fig. 4 showing the mounting means for the front bell crank which is applied to a fixed support secured to the boat;

Fig. 8 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 8-8 of Fig. 4 showing a guide block attached to the rear surface of the dashboard of the boat to support and guide the axial movement of a rack bar; and

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken substantially on the line 9-9 of Fig. 4 showing the means for releasably retaining the rack bar in cooperating relationship with the steering wheel pinion.

Before entering into a detailed description of the struc-, ture and operation of the present device,'it is deemed advisable to point out the adaptability of the present device for application to boats equipped with outboard motors. The simplicity of the present device makes it possible for the unit to be sold in kit form to permit the purchaser to mount the same' on any existing boat and connect it with virtually all outboard motors in a very short time. This is made possible by the simplicity with which the several subassemblies may be mounted and the fact that the varying distances between their mounting positions may be compensated for by cutting off the several connecting links to proper lengths. The device of the present invention is also adapted for use as original equipment by boat manufacturers and may be installed during the process of the boat manufacture.

Referring more particularly to Fig. 1 of the accompanyingrdrawings, it will be noted that the device comprises generally a control mounting bracket 10, a rear bell crank 11, a front bell crank 12, a rack bar .13 and a steeringwheel column assembly 14. The above parts of the-con trol device are mounted in a manner to be hereinafter more specifically described and connected by suitable link; age mechanism which affords a positively acting linkage between a steering wheel 15 and the gripping handle 16 of the outboard motor to effect lateral angular movement" of the motor under the influence of rotary movement of the steering wheel 15.

The control mounting bracket 10 may be of either cast or sheet metal form and may include a body portion 17 and a flange portion 18. The flange portion 18 is adapted to cooperate with a portion of the gripping handle 16 which forms an integral part of the outboard be placed into alignment with a hole formed in the gripping handle 16 for the receipt of any suitable anchoring means 21, such as a bolt, lock washer and nut. A cap screw 22 threaded into a flange portion of the control mounting bracketlt) provides 'the mounting means for an aviation type bearing 23which includes a substantially spherically shaped inner portion 24 provided with a centrally disposed bore 25 adapted to be slidably received over the body portion of the cap screw 22. The inner portion 24 of'the bearing is surrounded by a ring member 26 provided with a spherically shaped inner surface adapted to house the spherical surface of the inner portion 24 to provide a swivel connection which is'free oflost motion between the portion 24 and the ring member 26 of the bearing 23. The ring member 26"isretained within an annular end portion of a threaded rod 27. A spacer collar 28 may be positioned between the inner portion 24 of the bearing 23 and the under surface of the body of the mounting bracket 10 to increase the degree of swivclling action aflYorded between cooperating surfaces of the bearing 23.

An" elongated hexagonal nut 29 threadedly receivable on the end of the rod 27 provides a coupling between the bearing 23 and a laterally extending connecting rod 3!!which is provided with a threaded portion 31 which isals'o receivable in another elongated hexagonal nut 29 Tdisposedat'the opposite end of the connecting rod 30. Anothenaviation type bearing 23 is threadedly receivable in the last mentioned hexagonal nut 29. The last mentioned bearing 23 is mounted in a manner similar to that previously described on a cap screw 32 threadedly receivable adjacent one end of the rear bell crank 11.

The rear bell crank 11 includes an arm 33 adapted to be rockablymounted for horizontal swinging movement adjacent the forward end of a transom block 34 which is provided at its other extremity with a pair of angle brackets 35 adapted to be secured in proper position on theinner surface of the transom of the boat in any approved manner such as Wood screws or bolts 36.

Referring more particularly to Fig. 6 of the accompanying drawing it will be noted that an intermediate portion of the arm 33 is secured to the bell crank 11 by ni eans of cap screws 37. A bore 38 formed in the bell crank 11 isadapted to receive a bearing collar 39 throughwhich a mounting bolt 40 is passed, bearing plates 41 are positioned above and below the arm 33 and thelower portion of the mounting bolt 40 passes through a vertically disposed hole 42 formed in the transom block 34. The mounting bolt 40 is retained on the transom block 34 by a suitable anchoring means 43 in the form of a washer, lock washer and nut. A threaded hole 44 formed adjacent the forwardly projecting end of the rear bell crank 11 serves to receive a cap screw 45 on which another aviation type bearing 23 is mounted. The: threaded portion 27 of the bearing 23 is receivable in the threaded end of a forwardly extending tubular member 46 which is attached to one arm of the front bell crank 12 through the medium of a cap screw 47 which serves as the mounting means for another aviation type bearing 23 having its threaded portion 27 receivable in the forward endof the tubular member 46.

In instances where the steering mechanism is connected to a steeringwheel located in a forward cockpit of the boat thereby requiring that the tubular member 46 be of considerable length, it may be advisable to provide suitably slotted guide blocks for the tubular member to prevent its buckling. Another means for preventing the possibility of the buckling of the tubular member 46 is to have it slidably mounted in a second tubular member 48, as shown in Fig. 4, which in turn is supported by suitably spaced mounting blocks (one of which is shown) 49 suitably attached to the inner surface of the hull of the boat.

'The front bell crank 12 is mounted for substantially 4 horizontal rocking movement on a bolt 50 which depends from a fixedly mounted support 51 attached to the boat in any approved smanner adjacent its hull. Reference to Fig. 7 will show that the bearing surface and mounting means for the front bell crank 12 are identical with those previously described in connection with the rockable mounting of the rear bell crank 11.

A cap screw 52 threadedly receivable in a hole adjacent the end of the other arm of the front bell crank 12 serves as a support for another aviation type bearing 23. A means for altering the steering ratio of the control device comprises the inclusion in the last mentioned arm of the front bell crank of a threaded hole 53 disposed between the end of the arm and the point about which it pivots. The hole 53 is adapted to selectively receive the cap screw 52 to increase the throw of the bell crank 12 for a given linear movement of the rack bar 13 under rotational movement of the steering wheel 15. The threaded portion 27 of the last mentioned bearing 23 is adapted to be threadedly received in one end of a laterally projecting tube 54 which is provided at its other extremity with a similarly mounted aviationbearing 23 supported on a cap screw 55 which projects upwardly from and is disposed adjacent one end of the rack bar 13. A guide block 56 mounted on the undersurface of the dashboard of the boat provides a support for the intermediate portion of the rack bar 13. The upper surface of the rack bar 13 is provided with an elongated flat portion into which a series of rack teeth 57 are cut. A U-shaped sheet metal member 58 serves as a support and guide means for the rack portion of the bar 13. This member includes a pair of axially aligned holes 59 in its leg portions adapted to be received over a forward reduced shouldered portion 60 of the steering wheel column assembly 14. The steering wheel column assembly 14 includes a flanged portion 61 adapted to be secured in any approved manner on the surface of the dashboard of the boat. The steering wheel column assembly also includes an axially disposed bore which provides suitable bearing surfaces for a steering tube 62. One end of the steering tube serves as a mounting means for the steering wheel 15 and the other end includes a pinion 63 adapted to mesh with the rack teeth 57 of the bar 13 when the same is properly positioned on the steering wheel column assembly. A bolt 64 serves to maintain the parts of the steering wheel column assembly in proper associated relationship. The lower threaded portion of the bolt 64 is adapted to receive a washer 65 having suflicient diameter to cover the holes 59 in the member 58 and to abut the extremity of the shouldered portion 60 of the steering wheel column assembly 14. The washer 65 is held in place by a lock washer and nut 66 applied to the lower extremity of the bolt 64 serves to releasably retain the steering wheel column assembly in unitary form.

A collar 67 adjustably positioned adjacent the extremity of the rack bar 13 by the tightening of a set screw 68 serves to limit the movement of the rack bar 13 in one direction when the collar contacts one end of the U- shaped rack supporting member 58.

The steering control device of the present invention is further provided with a manually operable friction adjustment 69 disposed on the steering column adjacent the wheel 15. The purpose of this friction steering adjustment is to provide a means responsive to the will of the operator to adjust the degree of friction on the turning movement of the steering Wheel 15 in accordance with the desire of the operator. This feature of the device has an additional purpose in that it may be manually tightened to set the course of travel of the boat to permit the oporator to release his grip upon the steering wheel and thus have both hands free to handle a rod and reel if he is trolling or fishing or for any other desired purpose. The structure of the friction steering adjustment means comprises a boss 70 projecting downwardly from the steering column 14 and having an axially disposed threaded bore 71 adapted to receive a fibre plug 72, a coil spring 73 and the threaded end of a cap screw 74 provided with a transversely disposed pin or handle 75. This handle provides a ready means for altering the frictional gripping engagement of the fibre plug 72 with the surface of the tubular member 62 of the steering wheel assembly 14 through the medium of the coil spring 73 which is disposed between the cap screw 74- and the fibre plug 72.

The above described steering control for outboard motors is obtainable in kit form and may readily be installed on practically any existing boat adapted to be powered by an outboard motor. The installation procedure may be briefly summarized in the following manner. The out board motor is positioned and clamped on the transom of the boat in the usual manner, the control mounting bracket and associated steering rod assembly parts are connected to the gripping handle 16 of the outboard mo tor. The front of the outboard motor is then swung to its extreme position away from the side of the boat on which the transom block 34 is to be mounted. The angle brackets 35 on the transom block 34 are then held against the inner surface of the transom in a position approximately four inches from the side of the hull of the boat with the top of the long arm 33 of the rear bell crank 11, which has previously been anchored on the transom block 34, approximately three inches below the level of the motor steering rod bracket. This positioning of the transom block and rear bell crank is important to permit the proper tilting of the motor to raise the propeller out of the water without impairing the positive driving connection between the remotely positioned steering wheel and the outboard motor. The rear bell crank 11 is then swung to a position in which the bearing 23-, adjacent its forward end is in contact with the side of the transom block. The free end of the connecting rod 30 is then raised and placed adjacent the threaded end 27 of the bearing 23 placed adjacent the extremity of the long arm of the rear bell crank 11. The connecting rod 31 should be pencil marked just short of the threaded end of the bearing 23 carried by the long arm of the bell crank 11. The outboard motor and the rear bell crank should then be swung to their other extreme positions with the long arm of the bell crank just clear of engagement with the inner surface of the hull. ing rod 30 should again be raised and if the pencil mark on the connecting rod 30 is located just short of the threaded portion 27 of the last mentioned bearing 23, the positioning of the transom block is correct and it should be secured in place by the use of cap screws or bolts 36. The free end of the connecting rod 30* should then be cut off and threaded to receive a portion of one of the hexagonal nuts 29*.

The next step in the procedure is to mount the front bell crank below the fixed support 51 which may be in the form of a plywood strip suitably secured to the boat in a position substantially flush with the bottom of the dashboard. The hole for receiving the bolt for mounting the front bell crank 12 should be positioned approximately five inches forward from the dash and about four inches from the side of the hull. After the front bell crank 12 is bolted in place on the lower surface of the fixed suppont 51, the center distance between the front and rear bell cranks should be measured and the tubular member 46 should be cut off approximately two inches shorter than the center distance between the bell cranks. The cutoff end of the tube should then be tapped to receive the threaded portion 27 of the bearing 23 mounted on the shorter arm of the front bell crank 12.

The next step is the mounting of the steering wheel assembly 14. The dashboard of the boat should be notched or drilled to permit proper mounting of the wheel assembly which is secured to the face of the dash. Re-

The free-end of the connectmove the nut 66, lock washer and washer 6'5"and the U-shaped member 58 from the forward end of the steering column bolt 64. Draw the steering column bolt 164 into the column by pulling on the steering wheel-15t Place the rack bar 13 in the bottom of the U-shaped member 58 with the rack teeth 57 on the top side and slide the U-shaped member 58 back onto the forward end of the steering column with the rack teeth 57 in mesh with the pinion 63. extend the bolt 64 through the U-shaped member 58 and replace the washer 65, lock washer and nut 66 leaving the nut loose until the balance of the installation is completed so that the steering wheel 15 may be properly positioned for straight forward travel of the boat.

With the rack bar 13 held in a horizontal position, and the wheel 15 turned to an extreme position wherein the bearing 23 located on the end of the bar 13 is as close to the steering column 14 as possible. Measure the diS'. tance from the underside of the dash to the center of the bearing end of the rack bar 13'. Transfer this measurement to the wide portion of the rack guide block, measuring from the mounting surface of the block and drill a hole in the block to form a guide for the free end of the rack bar. Apply the guide block 56 to the rack bar 13 and then secure the guideblock to the undersurface of the dash.

The next step in the procedure is to connect the free. end of the rack with the front bell crank. Measure the distance from the front end of the steering column bolt 64 to the pivot point of the front bell crank 12. Cutoff the tapped end of the tube 54 approximately thirteen inches shorter than the measured distance between the end of the steering column bolt and the pivot point of the bell crank. Tap the cutoff end of the tube 64 so that it may be received on the threaded portion 27 of the bear-, ing 23 carried by either the long arm of the bell crank 12 or the free end of the rack bar 13'.

The final step in the procedure comprises the proper positioning of the wheel. In order to accomplish this, the outboard motor is swung to a position for straighttravel. The nut 66, lock washer and washer 65 are removed from the front end of the bolt 64, the pinion 63 is withdrawn from the rack teeth 57, the wheel is swung to the desired spoke position and the pinion is remeshejd with the rack teeth 57. After-this has been accomplished, the washer 65, lock washer and nut 66 are tightened to secure the wheel in desired position and the installation is complete.

Rotation of the wheel in either direction will then re sult in the positive lateral turning movement of the motor by reason of the positively acting linkage connection between the wheel and the motor.

From the foregoing description it will be apparent that a simple and effective positively acting steering control has been provided for outboard motors which may be effectively operated from a point remote from the position of the motor.

It will further be noted that a new and improved device has been provided in a form which renders it capable of being applied to virtually all existing boats which may be equipped with outboard motors.

While I have chosen to illustrate and describe the use of the present steering control in conjunction with a single outboard motor, it is to be understood that aplurality of outboard motors may be similarly controlled merely by the addition of a motor mounting bracket to the second motor and connecting the same to the motor mounting bracket of the first motor by means of a link or connecting rod similar to that interposed between the motor mounting bracket and the long arm of the rear bell crank 12. A

While the invention has been described in considerable detail in the foregoing specification, it is to be understood that variouschanges may be made in its embodk Push the steering Wheel forward to '7 ment without departing from a sacrificing any of the advantages hereinafter claimed.

I claim:

1. The combination with a boat having a dirigibly and tiltably mounted outboard motor of a positive acting push-pull mechanical steering control for selectively affording different operating ratios for effecting lateral angular movement of the motor, said positive acting push-pull mechanical steering control comprising a Wheel including a shaft and pinion attached to the boat at a position forwardly of and remotely from the motor, and positively acting push-pull mechanical linkage operatively associated with said positive acting push-pull mechanical steering wheel pinion and the motor, said linkage comprising a rack bar disposed in meshing relationship with said steering wheel pinion, a front bell crank providing selective mechanical advantage mounted for horizontal swinging movement on a fixed support disposed in lateral spaced relationship with said steering wheel assembly, a connecting link having its respective end pivotally attached to said rack bar and one arm of said front bell crank providing a fixed mechanical advantage, a rear bell crank mounted for horizontal swinging movement on a fixed support disposed in lateral spaced relationship with the motor, a connecting link disposed adjacent the hull of the boat and having its respective ends pivotally attached to the other arm of said front bell crank and one arm of said rear bell crank, and a connecting link having its respective ends provided with ball and socket joints attached to the other arm of said rear bell crank and a forwardly projecting portion of the motor whereby the motor may be forwardly tilted without impairing the effectiveness of the positive acting push-pull steering control mechanism disposed between said steering wheel and the motor.

2. The combination with a boat having a dirigibly and tiltably mounted outboard motor adapted for lateral turning and vertical tilting movements of a positively acting push-pull mechanical steering control for selectively afiording different operating ratios for effecting lateral turning movement of the outboard motor, said steering control comprising a wheel assembly including a shaft and pinion attached to the boat at a position forwardly of and remotely from the motor, said positively acting push-pull mechanical steering control including a rack bar disposed in meshing relationship with said pinion and guided for axial movement in response to rotation of said pinion, a front bell crank having means on one arm by which selective mechanical advantage may be obtained mounted for horizontal swinging movement on a fixed support disposed adjacent the hull of the boat in lateral spaced relationship with said steering wheel assembly, a connecting link having its respective ends pivotally attached to said rack bar and one arm of said front bell crank, a rear bell crank providing a fixed mechanical advantage mounted for horizontal swinging movement on a fixed support disposed adjacent the hull of the boat in lateral spaced relationship with the motor and in longitudinal spaced relationship with said front bell crank, a connecting link having its respective ends pivotally attached to the other arm of said front bell crank and one arm of said rear bell crank, and a connecting link having its respective ends provided with ball and socket joints attached to the other arm of said rear bell crank and a forwardly projecting portion of the motor whereby the motor may be forwardly tilted without impairing the effectiveness of the positive acting pushpull steering control mechanism disposed between said steering wheel and the motor.

3. The combination with a boat having a dirigibly and tiltably mounted outboard motor adapted for lateral turning and vertical tilting movement of a positively acting push-pull mechanical steering control for selectively affording different operating ratios for effecting the lateral turning movement of the outboard motor, said positive acting push-pull mechanical steering control comprising a steering column assembly including a wheel, drive shaft and pinion, said steering wheel assembly being attached to the boat at a position forwardly of and remotely from the motor, said positively acting push-pull mechanical steering control comprising linkage disposed to operate in a substantially horizontal plane and interposed between said steering wheel assembly and the outboard motor, said positively acting linkage including a rack bar in meshing engagement with said pinion and guided for axial movement in a substantially horizontal plane, a front bell crank provided with means for altering its mechanical advantage mounted for horizontal swinging movement on a fixed support disposed in lateral spaced relationship with said steering wheel assembly and mounted adjacent the hull of the boat, a connecting link having its respective ends attached tosaid rack bar and one arm of said front bell crank, a rear bell crank having a fixed mechanical advantage mounted for horizontal swinging movement on a fixed support disposed adjacent the stern of the boat in substantial alignment and longitudinally spaced relationship with said front bell crank, a connecting link having its respective ends attached to the other arm of said front bell crank and one arm of said rear bell crank, a control mounting bracket releasably retained in position on a fixed portion of the outboard motor, and a laterally extending connecting link having its respective ends in swivel connection with said control mounting bracket and the other arm of said rear bell crank whereby rotational movement of the steering wheel transmits lateral turning movement of the outboard motor through the positively acting linkage connection between said wheel and the motor, said swivel connection between said last named laterally extending connecting link and said control mounting bracket and arm of said rear bell crank serving to permit the tilting movement of said motor without impairing the positive driving connection between said steering wheel and motor.

4. The combination with a boat having a dirigibly and tiltably mounted outboard motor of a positive acting push-pull mechanical steering control for selectively affording different operating ratios for effecting the lateral turning movement of the outboard motor, said positive acting push-pull mechanical steering control comprising a steering wheel assembly including a steering wheel, shaft and pinion, said steering wheel assembly being attached to the boat at a position forwardly of and remotely from the motor, and positive acting push-pull mechanical motion transmitting linkage connecting said steering wheel pinion with the motor, said positive acting push-pull motion transmitting linkage including a rack disposed in meshing engagement with said steering wheel and adapted for axial movement in response to rotation of said pinion, a front bell crank provided with means for selectively altering its mechanical advantage mounted for horizontal swinging movement on a fixed support disposed in lateral spaced relationship with said steering wheel assembly end adjacent the hull of the boat, a connecting link having its respective ends attached to said rack bar and one arm of said front bell crank, a rear bell crank having a fixed mechanical advantage mounted for horizontal swinging movement on a fixed support disposed in longitudinal spaced relationship and sub stantial alignment with said front bell crank, a connecting link having its respective ends attached to the other arm of said front bell crank and one arm of said rear bell crank, guide means for said last named connecting link to preclude buckling thereof, a control mounting bracket adapted for releasable attachment to a fixed portion of the outboard motor, and a laterally extending connecting rod having its respective ends in swivel connection with said control mounting bracket and the other arm of said rear bell crank whereby the outboard motor may be tilted in a vertical plane without impairing the positive driving connection between said steering wheel 9 10 assembly and the motor, said motion transmitting linkage 1,869,871 Stout Aug. 2, 1932 being responsive to rotational movement of said wheel foa- 2,309,159 Binger I an. 26, 1943 effecting lateral angular movement of the dirigibly 2,498,285 Leonard Feb. 21, 1950 mounted motor to thereby effect steering of the boat. 2,527,362 Hussa 24, 1950 References Cited in the file of this patent 5 2629356 Whltmg 1953 UNITED STATES PATENTS FOREIGN PATENTS 792,121 Donovan J n 13, 1905 107,4 r at Britain Jul 5, 1917 83 ,798 L 9, 1906 41 ,161 Great Britain Sept. 28, 19-34 1,167,714 Pfau Jan. 11, 1916

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US792121 *Aug 31, 1904Jun 13, 1905James J DonovanSteering device for power-boats.
US832798 *Oct 23, 1905Oct 9, 1906Fred A LawSteering device.
US1167714 *Dec 26, 1912Jan 11, 1916Allis Chalmers Mfg CoRelief mechanism for hydraulic turbines.
US1869871 *Jul 19, 1926Aug 2, 1932Ford Motor CoAirplane
US2309159 *Apr 4, 1941Jan 26, 1943Binger Lawrence WFoot steering device for outboard motors
US2498285 *Apr 22, 1946Feb 21, 1950Westinghouse Electric CorpSteering control with pneumatic pickup
US2527362 *Dec 26, 1947Oct 24, 1950Hussa Leopold RDual steering control arrangement for boats
US2629356 *May 15, 1951Feb 24, 1953Whiting Floyd EPower boat steering and control means
GB107404A * Title not available
GB417161A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3028764 *Jan 4, 1960Apr 10, 1962Randol Glenn TAutomotive variable-drive power transmission
US3080953 *Jan 6, 1960Mar 12, 1963Fmc CorpBoat steering mechanism
US3088330 *Jan 14, 1960May 7, 1963Kiekhaefer CorpMechanical linkage for remote control
US3095849 *Jul 27, 1961Jul 2, 1963Controlex Corp AmericaSteering apparatus for outboard motors
US3111042 *Aug 25, 1961Nov 19, 1963Feathertouch Marine EquipmentBoat steering assembly
US3136283 *Jul 13, 1962Jun 9, 1964Kiekhaefer CorpSteering control means for inboardoutboard drives
US3136285 *Jan 7, 1963Jun 9, 1964Kiekhaefer CorpSteering arrangement for outboard propulsion unit
US3183737 *May 14, 1962May 18, 1965Teleflex IncExpansion compensated control system
US3184991 *Dec 23, 1960May 25, 1965Teleflex IncSteering control
US3208300 *Sep 20, 1962Sep 28, 1965Morse John FSteering and motion transmitting mechanism
US3832967 *Feb 21, 1973Sep 3, 1974Rockwell International CorpImproved steering system
US4050398 *May 14, 1976Sep 27, 1977Holliday Guidance Systems, Inc.Pontoon boat guidance system
US4054102 *May 21, 1976Oct 18, 1977Outboard Marine CorporationDual cable steering system
US4373920 *Jul 28, 1980Feb 15, 1983Outboard Marine CorporationMarine propulsion device steering mechanism
US4527983 *Jul 27, 1983Jul 9, 1985Booth Jerry NTrolling control for boats
US6406340 *Jan 23, 1998Jun 18, 2002Teleflex (Canada) LimitedTwin outboard motor hydraulic steering system
DE29520180U1 *Dec 20, 1995Feb 8, 1996Vorbrueggen Vofa WerkBetätigungszug
Classifications
U.S. Classification114/144.00R, 440/63, 74/498, 74/480.00B
International ClassificationB63H25/06, B63H20/00, B63H20/12, B63H25/10
Cooperative ClassificationB63H21/265
European ClassificationB63H21/26B